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  1. #11
    Senior Member SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Hammock
    Home made Ghost Hammock
    Tarp
    7'x9' cuben tarp
    Insulation
    Pads and quilts
    Suspension
    UCRs, Dutchware
    Posts
    1,743
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    92
    I'm likely to move camp if I can't find trees close enough. I really hate long hangs anyway, generally I am tight and low. I've got some 6' stuff I bought from Opie and ended up always having a big wad of unused cord.

    FWIW, it seems that a lot of people here are a lot bigger than me and tend to camp in places where there are huge trees far away from each other. In my mind that translates to car camping or something LOL.
    NO SNIVELING!
    www.hikinghq.net - Hiking H.Q.
    www.bmtguide.com - the BMT Thru Hiker's Guide

  2. #12
    Senior Member SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Hammock
    Home made Ghost Hammock
    Tarp
    7'x9' cuben tarp
    Insulation
    Pads and quilts
    Suspension
    UCRs, Dutchware
    Posts
    1,743
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by ikemouser View Post
    SGT ROCK, I take it you used 12" of paracord to sheathe your slings to protect against abrasion? I only used about 5 inches, and when burned to prevent fray, they melted down to about 4. DO you think that is enough protection(the part touching the hammock is fully covered) or should i put a double amount? It was difficult getting the sling through the sheath anyway, as i had already constructed them beforehand.
    I probably could have got away with less on that hammock. I only use it on the Nano7 as I was worried I would saw through the material. On my "Ghost Hammock" as I have named it, I mount the UCRs over the whipping cord.

    If your cords are fully covered I think you are OK. And yep, it is a pain in the butt getting the cords through that sheath when they are already made - I did it too.
    NO SNIVELING!
    www.hikinghq.net - Hiking H.Q.
    www.bmtguide.com - the BMT Thru Hiker's Guide

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sisters, Or
    Hammock
    Castaway
    Tarp
    Equinox sil tarp
    Insulation
    down sleeping bags
    Suspension
    rigid SLS + whoopy
    Posts
    63
    SGT Rock
    In the Douglas fir (rain forests) in Oregon 2.5 foot diameter tees 20 feet, or more, apart is normal. The smaller "shrubs" in the forest can't support a hammock. Oh and try lighting a fire in a rain forest just for fun. I use my snowpeak gigapower torch to get a campfire going, its that or a chainsaw and full axe.
    Jim S

  4. #14
    Senior Member SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Hammock
    Home made Ghost Hammock
    Tarp
    7'x9' cuben tarp
    Insulation
    Pads and quilts
    Suspension
    UCRs, Dutchware
    Posts
    1,743
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim S View Post
    SGT Rock
    In the Douglas fir (rain forests) in Oregon 2.5 foot diameter tees 20 feet, or more, apart is normal. The smaller "shrubs" in the forest can't support a hammock. Oh and try lighting a fire in a rain forest just for fun. I use my snowpeak gigapower torch to get a campfire going, its that or a chainsaw and full axe.
    Jim S
    Ouch.
    NO SNIVELING!
    www.hikinghq.net - Hiking H.Q.
    www.bmtguide.com - the BMT Thru Hiker's Guide

  5. #15
    Senior Member SGT Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Hammock
    Home made Ghost Hammock
    Tarp
    7'x9' cuben tarp
    Insulation
    Pads and quilts
    Suspension
    UCRs, Dutchware
    Posts
    1,743
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by ikemouser View Post
    SGT ROCK, I take it you used 12" of paracord to sheathe your slings to protect against abrasion? I only used about 5 inches, and when burned to prevent fray, they melted down to about 4. DO you think that is enough protection(the part touching the hammock is fully covered) or should i put a double amount? It was difficult getting the sling through the sheath anyway, as i had already constructed them beforehand.
    Quote Originally Posted by SGT Rock View Post
    I probably could have got away with less on that hammock. I only use it on the Nano7 as I was worried I would saw through the material. On my "Ghost Hammock" as I have named it, I mount the UCRs over the whipping cord.

    If your cords are fully covered I think you are OK. And yep, it is a pain in the butt getting the cords through that sheath when they are already made - I did it too.
    I bring this up because I had a hard lesson today. The Ghost Hammock had a slight set back. The Dynaglide UCR slipped from the prtective whipping and sawed through one of my hammock. I'm working a fix - but looks like I need a 550 cord sheath on that one too.
    NO SNIVELING!
    www.hikinghq.net - Hiking H.Q.
    www.bmtguide.com - the BMT Thru Hiker's Guide

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