Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Pack sizes?

  1. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    Ridge Outdoor Gear 360
    Tarp
    SaphiRose 10x12
    Insulation
    ENO UQ/TQ
    Posts
    11
    lol set myself up for that reply.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  2. #12
    reznix's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lehigh Valley, PA
    Hammock
    BB XLC
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    Wookie and LL TQ
    Suspension
    Beetle Buckles
    Posts
    93
    Some pics of the econ burrow 20 degree compressed:

    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...rrow-top-quilt

  3. #13
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    Ridge Outdoor Gear 360
    Tarp
    SaphiRose 10x12
    Insulation
    ENO UQ/TQ
    Posts
    11
    Perfect! Mental note, next time just ask for pictures.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Lancaster, OH
    Hammock
    DIY 11 ft Double Layer
    Tarp
    HG Cuben
    Insulation
    HG Inc30 / B40
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    437
    Quote Originally Posted by reznix View Post
    Some pics of the econ burrow 20 degree compressed:

    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...rrow-top-quilt
    Love it!
    Harry Carlson
    Customer Support
    www.hammockgear.com
    740-445-4327
    [email protected]

  5. #15
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien #6235, #7111
    Tarp
    HG hex, hex w/door
    Insulation
    Enigma, Incubator
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    3,668
    Images
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by bucky716 View Post
    Perfect! Mental note, next time just ask for pictures.
    I wish I had some before/after pics of a sleeping bag that that used to be included in a survival kit that the USAF supplied to airmen a few decades ago. I was a student in the water survival course at Homestead AFB back in 1977 and this was part of the "butt boat" system that was supposed to keep you alive (or prolong your misery as you were eaten alive by mosquitoes in the mangrove swamps) if you had to bail out. Anyway, they opened one of the sleeping bag units that had apparently been compressed by a hydraulic ram into a granite-hard plug about 1 liter in volume. It was hard to believe that the thick material and low FP down could be smooshed that small, and certainly nothing short of the original hydraulic ram was going to get it back into its container. What was amazing was that it fluffed up fairly nicely after 1/2 hour or so.
    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ) Instagram (me!)

    “To equip a pedestrian with shelter, bedding, utensils, food, and other necessities, in a pack so light and small that he can carry it without overstrain, is really a fine art.” ~ Horace Kephart, 1906

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Hammock
    Chameleon, Tree Runner
    Tarp
    Trail Haven
    Insulation
    Operator, Habanero
    Suspension
    Turtles, Whoopies
    Posts
    54
    I like to pack my quilts loose if I can. That way they don't get compressed anymore than they need to, but all your other gear will compress them as much as they need to be. Also makes the volume consumption in your pack a lot better since there's no bulky, rock like stuff sacks being packed. More comfortable on the butt I find as well!

  7. #17
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien #6235, #7111
    Tarp
    HG hex, hex w/door
    Insulation
    Enigma, Incubator
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    3,668
    Images
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by grimm0614 View Post
    I like to pack my quilts loose if I can. That way they don't get compressed anymore than they need to, but all your other gear will compress them as much as they need to be. Also makes the volume consumption in your pack a lot better since there's no bulky, rock like stuff sacks being packed. More comfortable on the butt I find as well!
    That is a good point. If I have a lot of room left after packing everything, I close the top of the pack and then 'massage' from the bottom of the pack upward to de-compress the quilts a bit and fill up the space toward the top of the pack. After that I might use side compression cords to snug it up a bit. Sometimes there can be a lot of excess space created as food is consumed.
    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ) Instagram (me!)

    “To equip a pedestrian with shelter, bedding, utensils, food, and other necessities, in a pack so light and small that he can carry it without overstrain, is really a fine art.” ~ Horace Kephart, 1906

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    West Virginia
    Hammock
    WBBB XLC Double
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    Econ
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    13
    When you pack your quilts loose, are you using a pack liner to prevent them for getting wet?

  9. #19
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien #6235, #7111
    Tarp
    HG hex, hex w/door
    Insulation
    Enigma, Incubator
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    3,668
    Images
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by mjbine View Post
    When you pack your quilts loose, are you using a pack liner to prevent them for getting wet?
    No pack liner for the past 10 years and no problems. DCF packs are pretty darn water resistant without any supplemental liner. Also, my rainwear of choice for heavy rain is a poncho, which makes an excellent pack cover as well, and I have one of the Lightheart Gear Hoodie Pack Covers that I have used a couple of times and which works quite well. The key feature of this piece is that it also prevents water from running down my spine, which is a weak point with virtually every other pack cover 'out there.'

    Yes, all packs can get little cuts and pinholes in them after a few hundred trail miles, but I'm not nearly as paranoid as some about keeping things bone dry, which is in any event a pipe dream. When on the trail, it is a fact of life that in most places your quilt or bag is rarely going to be absolutely dry when you pack it, so stuffing it in a hermetically-sealed sack or liner is only going to lock in the moisture anyway, so what good is it? Additionally—and especially with DWR down quilts—a few drops of water on the quilt is not the end of the world. I've had quilts get quite moist and found that they dried out very quickly if there was an opportunity in the afternoon to drape them over a shrub and expose them to direct sunlight. I've also had multiple days where the sun hasn't cooperated, so I did the best I could and it still worked out okay.

    I've seen people triple-seal things—inside a stuff sack, inside a liner, inside a pack—and I've never seen that it has provided any tangible benefit over simply stuffing them straight into the pack.

    However, if I was gunnna use a liner it'd be one of the Nylofume bags, which are sized perfectly for the pack liner role.

    I know, I know... it's different for kayak/canoe/rafting and some other non-backpacking activities...
    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ) Instagram (me!)

    “To equip a pedestrian with shelter, bedding, utensils, food, and other necessities, in a pack so light and small that he can carry it without overstrain, is really a fine art.” ~ Horace Kephart, 1906

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Hammock
    Chameleon, Tree Runner
    Tarp
    Trail Haven
    Insulation
    Operator, Habanero
    Suspension
    Turtles, Whoopies
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    No pack liner for the past 10 years and no problems. DCF packs are pretty darn water resistant without any supplemental liner. Also, my rainwear of choice for heavy rain is a poncho, which makes an excellent pack cover as well, and I have one of the Lightheart Gear Hoodie Pack Covers that I have used a couple of times and which works quite well. The key feature of this piece is that it also prevents water from running down my spine, which is a weak point with virtually every other pack cover 'out there.'

    Yes, all packs can get little cuts and pinholes in them after a few hundred trail miles, but I'm not nearly as paranoid as some about keeping things bone dry, which is in any event a pipe dream. When on the trail, it is a fact of life that in most places your quilt or bag is rarely going to be absolutely dry when you pack it, so stuffing it in a hermetically-sealed sack or liner is only going to lock in the moisture anyway, so what good is it? Additionally—and especially with DWR down quilts—a few drops of water on the quilt is not the end of the world. I've had quilts get quite moist and found that they dried out very quickly if there was an opportunity in the afternoon to drape them over a shrub and expose them to direct sunlight. I've also had multiple days where the sun hasn't cooperated, so I did the best I could and it still worked out okay.

    I've seen people triple-seal things—inside a stuff sack, inside a liner, inside a pack—and I've never seen that it has provided any tangible benefit over simply stuffing them straight into the pack.

    However, if I was gunnna use a liner it'd be one of the Nylofume bags, which are sized perfectly for the pack liner role.

    I know, I know... it's different for kayak/canoe/rafting and some other non-backpacking activities...
    Mostly agree with cmoulder here. My pack is XPac fabric and while the fabric is waterproof, the seams are not and they aren’t taped. Given that, I still use a pack liner (nyloflume) as recommended. I find a very small amount of water can leak in through the seams during heavy rains so it’s worth it more often than it’s not.

    I don’t use any sort of pack cover. In the summer where chance of rain is low, I take a poncho as well which covers the pack. Otherwise I just trust the liner to do it’s job.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • + New Posts
  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

    Similar Threads

    1. Always between sizes
      By Just Tom in forum Hammock Gear
      Replies: 4
      Last Post: 09-13-2018, 08:44
    2. 11'x8' vs 11'x5' (or sizes in between) ?
      By FunkTastic in forum General Hammock Talk
      Replies: 13
      Last Post: 11-25-2016, 00:35
    3. SYN UQ STUFF SIZES?
      By xtrm611 in forum Bottom Insulation
      Replies: 6
      Last Post: 04-11-2016, 08:03
    4. question about tq and uq sizes
      By holocene in forum Hammock Gear
      Replies: 6
      Last Post: 12-08-2014, 12:09
    5. Thread sizes
      By DemostiX in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
      Replies: 3
      Last Post: 06-08-2012, 22:05

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •