Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    114

    Solving cold spots with underquilts vs wool blankets and burrito wrap method.

    I've been experimenting with using wool blankets and the burrito wrap method:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRYXcOnrj6k

    My thinking is that if I have a wool blanket, it's also dual use because if I ever get caught in rain with soaked gear the wool blanket could save my life. The underquilts wouldn't be able to keep me warm because they're made with down.

    The problem is that it's a bit annoying to use the burrito wrap method inside a hammock. The material is constantly getting wrapped under you and you have to stretch it out.

    It's not TOO bad the first time but if you have to get out of bed in the middle of the night you're going to be fighting with blanket and re-shifting it under you.

    The problem I have with underquilts is that with my warbonnet setup I'm getting cold spots when I sleep on my side. Could I just not have it tight enough or my hang isn't positioned properly.

    The other thing I'm experimenting with is to just wear thick long underwear (wool or synthetic) and really thick socks. I actually bought some expedition socks for mountaineering as I tend to get cold feet easily.

    I'm sleeping outside about 95% of the time now and it's seriously cured my insomnia. Lost ten pounds and hitting the gym so put on like 5 lbs of muscle and getting ripped again.

    Hammocks are seriously underrated.

    The only thing I need to do is just nail these cold spots.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Sarasota Florida
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ridgerunner/ chameleon
    Tarp
    WB Thunderfly
    Insulation
    Synthetic UQ
    Suspension
    Dutch beetles
    Posts
    319
    I snug the quilt up to the hammock using shock cord over the ridge line. There are few things like triangle thingies that will steepen the angle of your UQ suspension. But what works best for me, but only when it gets real nippy, is shock cord over the ridgeline. And it doesn’t have to be very tight at all it just keeps it touching good


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Phantom Grappler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Denton NC
    Hammock
    WildernessLogics 12x6
    Tarp
    HG cuben 13ridge12
    Insulation
    TopQuiltUnderQuilt
    Suspension
    S and D
    Posts
    3,885
    Underquilt should lift empty hammock about a foot.
    I set underquilt, then pull it to one side, the front side so I can see it. The underquilt should hang half a foot to one foot higher than hammock, along its entire length. Then I place it back under hammock.

    The short ends of underquilt suspension should not be tightened too much, folding hammock into a U shape on both ends. This makes air gaps for cold air to get in. Do not fold ends into U shape by tightening short end cords too much!

    The secondary underquilt suspensions on both long sides of underquilt should be tight enough to prevent accordion effect. Accordion effect also lets in cold air and allows underquilt to sag below lowest level of hammock. This is usually where your butt is. Instant CBS cold butt syndrome. Hahaha

    If you still need your wool blanket, rather than using it like a burrito, and having to fight it when getting back in hammock in middle of night, just fold blanket.
    Fold blanket and place it in hammock to roughly match your body’s “footprint” when you lay in hammock. It’s not going to be perfect, but maybe cold spots will disappear.

    I would not choose to use blanket underneath me.
    I would hang a zero* underquilt instead of a 20* underquilt, if I thought I’d be cold.

    Sometimes when temperatures are in the low teens, I attach a 20* underquilt first, then “stack” a zero* underquilt last, on the outside, where I can see the zero* underquilt.

    If the 20* underquilt gets smushed a bit, losing some loft and insulation—I does not care! The smushed 20* underquilt banishes almost all air gaps and cold spots. Even when smushed a bit, it does not lose all its insulation properties.

    The most capable cold weather hammock campers DO Not Compress their inner quilt when “stacking”. They do it right and get the most out of both underquilts. They have full loft in both of their “stacked” underquilts.

    Good luck on staying warm

  4. #4
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    2,666
    > because if I ever get caught in rain with soaked gear
    burtonator - what scenario can you imagine that happening? I started out with synthetics because of the “useless when wet” concern. But after years and years of using down and not even getting close to having it wet - and this is kayak camping (lot’s of water around) - I trust my gear.

    If you expect rain, or even if you didn’t, many backpackers carry a rain cover for their pack, or have their down (and other clothes) in a waterproof trash bag inside their park, or many packs these days come with a rolled top like a dry bag. I’d have to really work to result in my quilts getting wet because of rain.

    That said, one time - only one time - during tent camping days, a thick mist invaded the camp and all exterior surfaces were wet. That bothered me and was probably why I started with synthetics. But had I a tarp with doors, and/or a UQP, I probably would have been fine. Also, if the mist arrived mid day, and I saw how exterior surfaces were getting damp, I could have stuffed the quilts away. In that situation, the blanket would be just as exposed as a TQ. Sure, we’ve all read that wool can keep you more warm than down when wet - but I’d think the focus should be on not getting wet.

    Of course mishaps occur. But, for me, the odds of my gear getting wet are so small, I’d rather focus on something extra for an adequate shelter.

    If car camping or at home, sure - a blanket, why not. But if I’d be hiking, I’d prefer the wider temperature range, compactness, and lighter weight, a down TQ provides.
    Last edited by cougarmeat; 06-13-2021 at 15:14.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  5. #5
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    Dutch PolyD
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG 0, 20, 40
    Suspension
    Dutch Whoopie Hook
    Posts
    14,483
    Images
    3
    I've taken my backpack through a river about five different times and my down quilts have never gotten wet. I have them in cuben fiber stuff sacks inside a garbage bag.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    114
    > burtonator - what scenario can you imagine that happening? I started out with synthetics because of the “useless when wet” concern. But after years and years of using down and not even getting close to having it wet - and this is kayak camping (lot’s of water around) - I trust my gear.

    True story. I was in Yosemite once, in my tent, and got caught in an EPIC thunderstorm which triggered a flash flood due to all the granite (no dirt to absorb the water) and really got it by it. Was unexpected. My sleeping bag didn't get hit as much by the water but by the rain when I took it out of the tent.

    Granted this was a tent not a hammock but weird things happen.

    This is the 'two is one, one is none' school of thought /pragmatic philosophy.

  7. #7
    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Hammock
    I have many so....
    Tarp
    Blackcrow DIY Tarp
    Insulation
    FrankenquiltUQ/Pod
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    22,540
    Images
    62
    It takes some time to properly set-up a UQ and get ot right sometimes. Even side sleeping.
    The wool blanket may be a pain to manage in a hammock.
    Shug



    ShugArt Hammock Paintings....https://www.etsy.com/shop/ShugArtStu...platform-mcnav

    Whooooo Buddy)))) All Secure in Sector Seven

  8. #8
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    2,666
    >My sleeping bag didn't get hit as much by the water but by the rain when I took it out of the tent.
    Not sure why you’d take it out of your tent in the rain instead of stuffing it your backpack.
    Of course, now that you are hammocking, you can pack everything up under the dry tarp, then put the tarp away last.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  9. #9
    Herder of Cats OutandBack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    8,655
    Images
    129
    A breathable UQP can really help an UQ's suspension keep the quilt up against you. As a side sleeper, I would stay away from UQ's with lay on your back leg shelf.
    With proper packing and setting up your camp right meaning Tarp first your down should never get wet. I love wool but it is heavy and bulky.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    SW Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 SL
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    WB and UGQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies or Straps
    Posts
    7,133
    Images
    248
    As Saltfly suggested, some shock cord from the UQ over the ridgeline helps a lot. It's what I do for my winter UQ set up. Where are your cold spots? A good wool base layer goes a long way to help keep me warm. I echo the opinions on the wool blanket. I don't know that it's worth the weight and bulk to carry on a back country trip and I think you could get by fine if you continue to tweak your set up. Good luck!
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  • + New Posts
  • Similar Threads

    1. Wool blankets vs TQ
      By kwadkytz in forum Top Insulation
      Replies: 19
      Last Post: 11-04-2016, 15:35
    2. Help me wrap my head around some sewing concepts for underquilts
      By mrjaw14 in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
      Replies: 3
      Last Post: 03-17-2014, 19:17
    3. 100% wool blankets
      By HamMach1 in forum Top Insulation
      Replies: 42
      Last Post: 02-27-2014, 09:04

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •