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Thread: Sag

  1. #1
    Senior Member Graybeard's Avatar
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    Sag

    Is there an established and accepted way of expressing the amount of sag in a suspension line or hammock? Expressions like "generous sag" or "more than you would expect" can mean one thing to one person and quite a different thing to another. Yet I haven't come across a post that was more specific.
    bob

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    Senior Member optimator's Avatar
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    I know with the Warbonnet hammocks its around 30 degrees.
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    Senior Member JerryW's Avatar
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    Yes, 25 - 30 degrees is the usual starting point as shown in this illustration by dejoha.


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    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    What makes a comfortable sag will be different for everyone...you might start with a 100" ridgeline and a 10' hammock body. That will set the sag of the hammock's body consistently every time, and it's what several of the popular hammocks use.

    If you're doing it w/ a DIY hammock, then hanging it so your supports are about 30 degrees will be a good starting point. Check here for a couple of pics of sag to get an idea.
    http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockGlossary.html
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  5. #5
    Nice illustration, but doesn't a ridgeline make the hang angle irrelevant? I thought that was the point. It'll make a difference in the amount of force being applied to the trees, but it won't change the way the hammock feels.

    Isn't that the whole point of the ridgeline? Or have I completely misunderstood?

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    Senior Member Graybeard's Avatar
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    Ummmmm......sorry, sports fans.........I think I failed to make my question clear. A newcomer doesn't need to read many posts before coming across the suggestion of hanging at about thirty degrees. But to a lot of people, my dearly beloved wife included, the device for measuring degrees is a thermometer, not an inclinometer. Not for me, of course. I'm mathematically inclined. I even know what the word "trigonometry" means. Big deal! I went out and hung my hammock at "thirty degrees." Then I went back to my shop and dug up my inclinometer. To my ego-smashing astonishment, I was off by ten degrees. Do you have an inclinometer?
    The question I asked was
    Is there an established and accepted way of expressing the amount of sag in a suspension line or hammock?
    The answer, of course, is Yes: degrees. The question should have been
    Is there a more useful way of expressing the amount of sag.....
    I realize that a few degrees one way or the other is no big deal but I found that ten degrees is a big deal.
    It seems to me that expressing sag in degrees (measured at the tree, not at the hammock, of course) is a disservice to those who are not mathematically inclined or experienced. Is this a non-issue???
    bob

  7. #7
    Knotty's Avatar
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    I think saying 30 degrees from horizontal is the only practical recommendation. If you shoot for 30 and are off by 10 that shouldn't be a problem. But if someone doesn't know to try for 30 and instead thinks they should pull the suspension straight horizontal...well that's a problem.

    If someone doesn't know what 30 degrees means they can find out by using the internet.
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    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Losdindawoods View Post
    Nice illustration, but doesn't a ridgeline make the hang angle irrelevant? I thought that was the point. It'll make a difference in the amount of force being applied to the trees, but it won't change the way the hammock feels.

    Isn't that the whole point of the ridgeline? Or have I completely misunderstood?
    No, you've understood correctly. If you use a ridgeline, it makes your hang much more consistent. There are still a few times when it won't be...like when your ridgeline isn't taut, for example...but for the most part that's the function of a structural ridgeline.

    It also means that you can get the optimal hang in suboptimal spots...like not having to put your supports 10' off the ground to get the right amount of sag.

    But it's possible to hang with the right angle and get the same sag as if a structural ridgeline were used. That's about where the 30 degrees comes in.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  9. #9
    Senior Member PuckerFactor's Avatar
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    I'm pretty good at eyeballing things, but how I wrap my brain around it is: Everyone knows 45 degrees, it's halfway between vertical and horizontal. I just picture 45 in my head and go "a smidge" lower, and usually end up close enough to 30 degrees for my satisfaction.
    I've considered printing a little card with a 30-degree angle on it, but never cared enough to bother, but since you asked for an easy way to find 30, here ya go! I even had to break out my Soh-Cah-Toa! Hope you find it helpful.
    30-degrees.jpg

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