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  1. #1
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    Would hanging this way be a bad idea?

    I have a workspace upstairs in my shed. I'm considering getting an indoor hanging kit and hanging it from the joists..... is this a bad idea? Joists are 16" on center. I have attached some pictures of the joists prior to me putting up sheeting over them. I plan on hanging it from one side of the shed to the other (not front to back). Where the floor is (since the roofline is angled) it's 16' across. Seems to be plenty of room even if I go up a bit for a good hang.
    As you can hopefully see from the pictures, the top (steeper) part of the joist is sitting on top of the bottom one, so vertical weight would rest on it.
    If it would be suggested, I could also span across several joists with a 2x4 (or larger) to distribute the weight and put the hanger on it.
    I'd probably opt for the ENO hammock hanging kit, unless someone has a sturdier suggestion. I plan on replacing the lag screws with FastenMaster HeadLOK structural screws.

    IMG_0383.jpg


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    Last edited by NetworkSandbox; 08-04-2022 at 15:34.

  2. #2
    Phantom Grappler's Avatar
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    Might work, might not work.
    It looks sturdy, but might not be able to resist forces of hammock suspension pulling laterally or inward towards middle of hammock, and vertically.

    I would choose to build a separate hammock stand with a tripod on each end and a ridge pole spanning distance between tripods.

    Consider side to side forces—if anyone gets in hammock and begins to swing back and forth. Homeowners insurance might not cover all losses.

    If I chose to attach hammock suspension to walls, I would strengthen walls to resist forces listed. I would probably overbuild with safety in mind.

    Good luck

  3. #3
    tlfillingim's Avatar
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    It would probably work. If you are sheeting over the joists, I would add a plenty of blocking between the joists on both ends to spread the force out and make sure you don't twist the joist over time.

  4. #4
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    I would not worry about it. Your weight in small compared to wind load. People hang inside with screw driven in to 2x4s in the wall of their house. This is no different.

  5. #5
    cougarmeat's Avatar
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    The pieces of the house, joists and wall studs, are designed (sized and attached) for various forces. The hammock adds different forces (in strength and direction). It could work fine - the joists would be better than wall studs. As Sean McC posted, many have done that successfully. But you also have to think of the consequences - what it means - if you are one of the unlucky people for whom it wasn't "successful".

    If it were me, I'd add my own bracing; not just use the lumber already in place. Like put in your own 2 x 4 or 2 x 6 and securely anchor it to the frame with metal brackets.

    Here's an "It works for most people ..." tale. Once upon a time, a few days before Thanksgiving, a local construction company decided to test the new culvert they ran under an irrigation canal. The construction had already been inspected and signed off by the city. Lots of culverts had been added by many people, in many locations, in the past. What could go wrong? In fact, that's the point. Somehow the implication of "test" had been forgotten. The possibility that the test would fail was not considered. And so the consequences of the test failing were not considered. The reservoir, high in the mountains, was opened to fill the canal around 3 AM in the morning. By 4 AM the police were knocking on all the neighbors' doors letting them know that their backyards and gardens were flooded. The basements, for people who had them, were flooded (via ventilation openings at the foundation level). Because our house was built on a slight rise, the water only reached about a foot away from those foundation vents - we were some of the lucky ones.

    So, if there's a potential for something not to work, I'm not saying, "Don't try it.", I'm saying beware of the consequences of failure and be prepared to respond to them.

    And now, the rest of the story ... Later in the day, the construction company owner came around and assured everyone that he would cover any damages - no questions asked. But then, his insurance company said, "Wait a minute. That job was inspected and "certified" complete by the city. It's their inspectors who are at fault." So that delayed things a bit while Insurance companies haggled over "fault." Eventually, damages were paid for, and amazing but true, the next year, right about the same time, the construction company sent everyone a $100 bill. The owner said he wanted to help erase the memory of the flood by replacing it with a surprise $100 just before Thanksgiving. He didn't have to do that.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  6. #6
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    In all fairness, I did look at the pictures for how the 2x4s are joined. They have a pretty serious plywood joint (looks like 3/4" ply on both sides, cut to the same exact shape on every joint). If it were a toe nailed butt joint I would be more worried. But this thing (shed) looks like it came from a kit from a place like Home Depot. This thing passed some checks on the design. If it were an ad-hoc home built construction from scrap lumber I would be worried about it not really being put together properly in the first place. That does not look like the case.

    The 'walls' are also angled together making it even stronger. Sort of like a stone arch.

    If you really want to worry about it, you could tack on a 2x4 over say four studs and fasten to that and distribute the load. Though looking at it, it is not necessary.

  7. #7
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    Yes, you’re right “plenty of blocking, to keep stud from twisting out” (not an exact quote, but close)

    And add a two by four next to stud, enough shorter to let your ridge pole sit directly on top of shorter stud. Then sandwich another stud on outside of ridge pole to keep it from jumping off. And you can use metal tie down straps to hold everything in place.

    If ridge pole is strong, you can hang hammock suspension directly to horizontal ridge pole that runs from one wall to the other wall, in same direction as hammock.
    The hammock suspension can be attached to ridge pole (might be square or rectangular shaped) very close to where ridge pole emerges from wall.

    Almost all forces by hammock load would be compression on ridge pole and most all downward force would be supported by vertical stud that is sandwiched between two full length studs.

    Good luck

    If I got paid to tell lies
    It just wouldn’t be as much fun

  8. #8
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    Take a look at these wall anchors from Dutchware: ADJUSTABLE WALL ANCHOR (PAIR)

    These are load anchor brackets used in the airfreight industry.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean McC View Post
    In all fairness, I did look at the pictures for how the 2x4s are joined. They have a pretty serious plywood joint (looks like 3/4" ply on both sides, cut to the same exact shape on every joint). If it were a toe nailed butt joint I would be more worried. But this thing (shed) looks like it came from a kit from a place like Home Depot. This thing passed some checks on the design. If it were an ad-hoc home built construction from scrap lumber I would be worried about it not really being put together properly in the first place. That does not look like the case.

    The 'walls' are also angled together making it even stronger. Sort of like a stone arch.

    If you really want to worry about it, you could tack on a 2x4 over say four studs and fasten to that and distribute the load. Though looking at it, it is not necessary.
    I have had this rig in my office for years and no problems. 4 inch lag bolts predrilled into the wall studs.

    20170304_173202.jpg

  10. #10
    tlfillingim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peeeeetey View Post
    I have had this rig in my office for years and no problems. 4 inch lag bolts predrilled into the wall studs.

    20170304_173202.jpg
    I have a similar setup on my porch with 4" eye bolts. Holds my considerable heft just fine.

    8x8" posts, concreted in, ceiling joists overhead, so calm down, I have seen all the videos of porch collapses.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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