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  1. #21
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fblc View Post
    Hello,

    Is it possible to use treck poles instaed of the spreader bars sold with the hammock ?

    Thanks
    funny you should mention that. See the videos embedded in this post.

    In the photo below


    I've tied some 2.8mm Spyderline to create a mesh that traps the tip on the end of the pole, notice also the large washer. Something like this could be made to work on the BMBH.
    Grizz
    (alias ProfessorHammock on youtube)

  2. #22
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollTide View Post
    Well from what im hearing I am not the only one who feels this design is kinda a double edge sword... very easily removable, but not great way to attach it. .... I guess its just a matter of getting over the fact you arent going to get a perfect seal.... if your that concerned, probably should go with a hammock with built in net or go with eno guardian style.....
    All this BMBH net talk reminded me to take mine on my day hike today, in the buggy MS woods. Though I still didn't see many bugs, as some of my clothes were treated with Permethrin plus I put on some Picaridin bug spray on exposed skin( walking through tall grassy areas in shorts, off trail). But, it worked pretty much as described above and was pretty quick and easy. After I got the hammock hung, I unhooked the net from the head end and folded towards the foot end enough for me to have room to get in. Sat down, took shoes off, laid down. Very quickly pulled the head end edge up and omni taped to head end of hammock.

    Basically, done. Good enough anyway. I was attached more than good enough on the lower end sides and foot, and above my head. All the upper body side net I just let hang INSIDE the hammock. It was not as tightly sealed as a zipper. But still, no flying bugs were going to get inside, so, good enough. After awhile, I hooked the rest of the Omni Tape, like I would when going to sleep to keep crawling bugs out. Really not hard. Then quickly took it back down, TOO HOT!

    If the Mossies are really flying, some are likely to come inside with you before you can get the net pulled up. But, a few are likely to get in with a zipper set up also. If it is that bad, I am going to have some Permethrin on my clothing and parts of the hammock anyway, plus some Picaridin or Deet on my skin.

    But this net is really quite usable after you practice with it a bit. And in the winter it comes off. But if the flying bugs are really attacking, I think my favorite (for a speedy closure) is the HH bottom entry.

    Murphy strikes: Zero rain forcaste. Two hammocks with me, but No tarp. As soon as I got the hammock hung and my pack hung off the ground on the suspension, it started raining! Light intermittent rain. I just ignored it, it helped me cool off during my break before I hiked back! The hammock dried quickly after the rain stopped.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 05-13-2010 at 15:50.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  3. #23
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    funny you should mention that. See the videos embedded in this post.

    In the photo below


    I've tied some 2.8mm Spyderline to create a mesh that traps the tip on the end of the pole, notice also the large washer. Something like this could be made to work on the BMBH.
    How much do wooden dowels weigh, and where do you get them? Do you really need them? Would an aluminum hiking pole collapse from the pressure of a bridge without the dowels? I'm thinking my spreader bars weigh ~3-4 oz? Would the dowels weigh 2 - 3 oz? How much net weight do you save by using the hiking poles instead of dedicated spreader bars, after the dowel weight is added back in? You do lose the use of your hiking poles to make a porch or side pull out for your tarp, so I wouldn't bother unless it is several oz. Maybe it is.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #24
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    All this BMBH net talk reminded me to take mine on my day hike today, in the buggy MS woods. Though I still didn't see many bugs, as some of my clothes were treated with Permethrin plus I put on some Picaridin bug spray on exposed skin( walking through tall grassy areas in shorts, off trail). But, it worked pretty much as described above and was pretty quick and easy. After I got the hammock hung, I unhooked the net from the head end and folded towards the foot end enough for me to have room to get in. Sat down, took shoes off, laid down. Very quickly pulled the head end edge up and omni taped to head end of hammock.

    Basically, done. Good enough anyway. I was attached more than good enough on the lower end sides and foot, and above my head. All the upper body side net I just let hang INSIDE the hammock. It was not as tightly sealed as a zipper. But still, no flying bugs were going to get inside, so, good enough. After awhile, I hooked the rest of the Omni Tape, like I would when going to sleep to keep crawling bugs out. Really not hard. Then quickly took it back down, TOO HOT!

    If the Mossies are really flying, some are likely to come inside with you before you can get the net pulled up. But, a few are likely to get in with a zipper set up also. If it is that bad, I am going to have some Permethrin on my clothing and parts of the hammock anyway, plus some Picaridin or Deet on my skin.

    But this net is really quite usable after you practice with it a bit. And in the winter it comes off. But if the flying bugs are really attacking, I think my favorite (for a speedy closure) is the HH bottom entry.

    Murphy strikes: Zero rain forcaste. Two hammocks with me, but No tarp. As soon as I got the hammock hung and my pack hung off the ground on the suspension, it started raining! Light intermittent rain. I just ignored it, it helped me cool off during my break before I hiked back! The hammock dried quickly after the rain stopped.
    I use the net the same way you do and have no trouble with it either.

  5. #25
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    How much do wooden dowels weigh, and where do you get them? Do you really need them? Would an aluminum hiking pole collapse from the pressure of a bridge without the dowels? I'm thinking my spreader bars weigh ~3-4 oz? Would the dowels weigh 2 - 3 oz? How much net weight do you save by using the hiking poles instead of dedicated spreader bars, after the dowel weight is added back in? You do lose the use of your hiking poles to make a porch or side pull out for your tarp, so I wouldn't bother unless it is several oz. Maybe it is.
    just measured an oak dowel. 1.6 oz for 11 inches.
    with a hiking pole that collapsed to 24 inches, say,
    then you'd need about 1/2 of this piece at each end
    of a BMBH. Add about an ounce for the wirenut and
    washer, and you have a weight budget of about 3.6 oz.

    My memory from hacking the BMBH in the "Ask Professor Hammock" video
    is that the BMBH poles are about 7 oz together.

    Ballpark then, a weight savings about about 3.5 oz if you use the
    dowels. For a short spreader bar like the BMBH has it maybe
    isn't needed...maybe...and you can decrease the compression
    on it by increasing the length of the suspension triangle.

    I get the dowels at Lowes.
    Grizz
    (alias ProfessorHammock on youtube)

  6. #26
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    just measured an oak dowel. 1.6 oz for 11 inches.
    with a hiking pole that collapsed to 24 inches, say,
    then you'd need about 1/2 of this piece at each end
    of a BMBH. Add about an ounce for the wirenut and
    washer, and you have a weight budget of about 3.6 oz.

    My memory from hacking the BMBH in the "Ask Professor Hammock" video
    is that the BMBH poles are about 7 oz together.
    Your memory serves you well. I just weighed mine. My digital fishing scale seems pretty accurate, but does not weigh fraction of oz, just whole oz. It's mostly showing 6 oz but occasionally shows 7, so between 6 and 7.

    Ballpark then, a weight savings about about 3.5 oz if you use the
    dowels. For a short spreader bar like the BMBH has it maybe
    isn't needed...maybe...and you can decrease the compression
    on it by increasing the length of the suspension triangle.

    I get the dowels at Lowes.
    Thanks Griz. So that is a worthwhile weight savings, especially for a gram counter who is trying to get below 10 lbs or even near 5. I'm not sure I would do it though, and have to give up the other dual use of the pole, for the tarp. Especially as the poles are especially handy for using grip clips to keep the tarp off of the bars while still allowing end closure. Hmmmmmm.......

    Alternatives:
    1: use long guy lines from the grip clip, hopefully long enough to reach a branch, getting rid of need for pole.
    2: use short foot end spreader bar for windward end, allowing closure without spreader bar problems.
    3: Use a Griz beak. Adds weight but enjoy luxurious room?
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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