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  1. #11
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    I used a 3/8", wide CCF pad with a 3/4 length inflateable InsulMat a couple days ago down into the mid 40's with 14 mph wind gusts and was plenty warm with a silkweight baselayer, fleece beanie, and 30 degree down bag. It felt like I could get down to about 40 degrees with that setup. I don't think I could have gone lower and I am a warm sleeper.

  2. #12
    Member Big E's Avatar
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    So, last night here in the Louisville KY area we got down to just below 50 and I took the opportunity to test cold(er) hammocking. I had my Western Mountaineering Mytlite 40 deg and had some running tights and an LL Bean Fleece pullover.

    I found that i was pretty comfortable with my feet in the footbox and the bag quilted over me. My hips down did get chilled, but it was not an unpleasant chilled. I think that can be corrected with fleece bottoms. Did not have to get into the bag and anytime I pulled the bag over my torso, I felt a little warmer than I wanted to be.

    I went out there thinking I would have to use my Trail-Lite Large inside the hammock, but that was not necessary.

  3. #13
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    I guess I should report back on my experience. Temps were 45-50. The first night it took a long time to get comfortable, but the second night I was OK. I slept on the oware, in a smartwool shadow hoodie and wool/poly blend tights. I messed around with a fleece blanket and a 40F (claimed 30F) synthetic bag as a quilt. The second night I skipped the tights. Neither time was I comfortable in socks, but I have NEVER been able to sleep in socks. I think this was a large part of why I had trouble the first night.

    I was VERY warm, and I believe I could easily have gone down to 30F. Most of the time, my arms and legs were exposed to the air. The Oware pad is thin, but very warm. I didn't have much trouble with it. I had no condensation despite 100% humidity (rain).

    I didn't get a chance to try the insulmat in addition to the oware. I will probably carry this if I go out in colder weather. I also am considering getting a second oware pad for this purpose as it's nice and soft.

    I also think I need a pillow of some sort, as I used the fleece I brought mostly in this fashion.

  4. #14
    the second oware pad is the best choice. if a narrower pad is used, it should go on top of the wider one, if you put it under instead, it will be much harder to adjust.

    in my experience with ccf pads, i have always found a major problem to be that they were always hard to get properly adjusted under my body. the problem was that the pad would stick to my clothes and the hammock too, which made it hard to slide to where it needed to be. once i got it situated under me, it would stay where it was. (i don't move around that much once i get comfy though).

    i solved this by attaching ripstop to the ccf on both sides. the pad is much easier to manouver, and is more comfortable to lay on.

    billybob, and those of you who advise making a pad grippier with silicone or whatever,
    have you had ccf pads slide around? i have had inflatables feel like they were sliding out from under me, but never with the ccf. i feel ccf is far too grippy.
    do ya'll put this no-skid application on the bottom of your SPE's if you have them?

  5. #15
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    billybob, and those of you who advise making a pad grippier with silicone or whatever,
    have you had ccf pads slide around? i have had inflatables feel like they were sliding out from under me, but never with the ccf. i feel ccf is far too grippy.
    do ya'll put this no-skid application on the bottom of your SPE's if you have them?

    I really have little experience with pads of either type except used with the SPE. I have only read about pads slipping around. Though I did have a friend on last Sept Wyoming trip who tried to use a CCP but had trouble keeping iy under him.

    The SPE has some mesh on the bottom which is supposed to keep the pads from slipping. You are saying I would be better off without that at least with CCF? I could flip it(SPE) over and then nylon would br in contact with the bottom.

  6. #16
    i was just curious, i thought the spe was ripstop front and back.

    i think having the nylon fabric against your clothes would do the best. the ccf sticks to them much more than it sticks to the "already slick" hammock fabric. it does stick to the hammock some too, but not nearly as much as it sticks to me. i just covered mine on both sides, so i can't say about leaving it grippy on the hammock side, but it works great when it's slick on both sides, but if i had to choose only one side to be covered, it would definately be the side i lay on.

  7. #17
    Member bmike's Avatar
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    great topic. i'm looking at how to go cold with my new HH, with stuff i might already have.

    anyone try one of these MPI space blankets in the bottom? windproof, and reflective. i'm thinking it would work similar to the concept of putting the e-blanket in the HH undercover.



    then do a fleece blanket or pad on top?

    i also have a sea to summit bag liner claiming to be able to add another 15* to a bag... i've tried it alone in a tent on a warm night and roasted, so i'm confident it will add heat to my old synthetic bag.

    i do like the underquilt ideas, but until i test out some stuff (and save $$ or time to make my own) i won't know which way to go.


    also, i cannot sleep in socks. just doesn't work for me.
    Last edited by bmike; 10-17-2007 at 13:03.

  8. #18
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    i was just curious, i thought the spe was ripstop front and back.

    i think having the nylon fabric against your clothes would do the best. the ccf sticks to them much more than it sticks to the "already slick" hammock fabric. it does stick to the hammock some too, but not nearly as much as it sticks to me. i just covered mine on both sides, so i can't say about leaving it grippy on the hammock side, but it works great when it's slick on both sides, but if i had to choose only one side to be covered, it would definately be the side i lay on.
    It is ripstop front and back with a mesh panel on the back. The mesh should be placed against the hammock body.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  9. #19
    Senior Member kohburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    great topic. i'm looking at how to go cold with my new HH, with stuff i might already have.

    anyone try one of these MPI space blankets in the bottom? windproof, and reflective. i'm thinking it would work similar to the concept of putting the e-blanket in the HH undercover.



    then do a fleece blanket or pad on top?

    i also have a sea to summit bag liner claiming to be able to add another 15* to a bag... i've tried it alone in a tent on a warm night and roasted, so i'm confident it will add heat to my old synthetic bag.

    i do like the underquilt ideas, but until i test out some stuff (and save $$ or time to make my own) i won't know which way to go.


    also, i cannot sleep in socks. just doesn't work for me.
    i'd been looking at picking up one of those. water proof, windproof, and almost infrared proof.

  10. #20
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    anyone try one of these MPI space blankets in the bottom? windproof, and reflective. i'm thinking it would work similar to the concept of putting the e-blanket in the HH undercover.


    That blanket is interesting. Comes in size 5x7 and already has grommets for rigging it to a hammock. Wonder how much it weighs. The website says "very lightweight".
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



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