View Poll Results: Pick your situation

Voters
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  • Got my Underquilt and will never look back..

    31 68.89%
  • Been there done that (underquilt) but prefer my Pad..

    5 11.11%
  • Desperately want an underquilt cause current setup just isn't cutting it.

    7 15.56%
  • I'm impervious to cold and mosquitos and don't use anything.

    2 4.44%
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  1. #1
    New Member ryaex's Avatar
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    Arrow Extreme Newb needing advice and input from the ALL KNOWING

    Want to know how many of you that have bought underquilts have gone back to using a pad? and if so, why?
    A majority of the really experienced hammockers tend to be screaming at the top of their lungs that the underquilt is the only way to go.
    I'm wondering how Tom Claytor's hammock would work with a exped downmat inserted into the pad sleeve.

    For the record, I own a HH Explorer Ultralight, and am currently in the market for another hammock for the wife and am considering getting myself a down underquilt and them doing the exped in the mosquito hammock to see the pro's and con's of both.

    I want YOUR opinions on this.

  2. #2
    good idea, try both. i like my uq, but recently made a double layer hammock, and was surprised by how comfy it made an air pad. my problem was that the big agnes air core was too narrow, but i think the exped or the stevenson warmlite is wider. hopefully it will be wide enough for you.

    a double layer hammock works well with a ccf pad too, and can be made as wide as you want





    Quote Originally Posted by ryaex View Post
    Want to know how many of you that have bought underquilts have gone back to using a pad? and if so, why?
    A majority of the really experienced hammockers tend to be screaming at the top of their lungs that the underquilt is the only way to go.
    I'm wondering how Tom Claytor's hammock would work with a exped downmat inserted into the pad sleeve.

    For the record, I own a HH Explorer Ultralight, and am currently in the market for another hammock for the wife and am considering getting myself a down underquilt and them doing the exped in the mosquito hammock to see the pro's and con's of both.

    I want YOUR opinions on this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    Lawrenceville, Ga
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    I use pads and underquilts. It depends on if I have company or not which combination I choose. In really cold weather such as my 10 degree campout, I used 3 pads with my Speer SPE.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  4. #4
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    My order of preference depends on the situation I'm camping in, but generally goes like this - homemade insulated hammock, underquilt, Exped Downmat 7. I don't use a CCF pad if I can help it b/c it makes me sweat. Well, I use it under my legs from about mid-thigh down when I use my insulated hammock, but I don't like using it under my torso...even when I'm not overheated it makes me sweat.

    For me, anything that lets me sleep directly on the hammock is best. But in some conditions (like extreme cold) I like the backup of having a pad.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  5. #5
    Since I switched over to the JRB underquilts I've been discovering that I need a lot less on top of me now that I have the bottom well insulated. From the cold camping I did last winter (down to 18 degrees) I believe for me that just throwing on extra layers of clothing (or putting them under me) should take care of anything that the quilts miss.
    If you must choose between two evils, opt for the one you've never tried before

  6. #6
    I've been contemplating the best insulation for the functionality, comfort, and price and just can't seem to make up my mind. Here's my quandry:

    1) Down underquilts seem to be the most comfortable and light weight of all the options but are limited because they are useless if you are forced to the ground and they are very expensive.

    2) CCF pads are quite uncomfortable and don't conform to the shape of the hammock and are difficult to wrestle in place inside a bottom entry hammock like the HH. They also are difficult to keep underneath you. They are, however, very cheap.

    3) Inflateable pads give decent insulation but I have yet to find one that is mummy cut, wide, and regular length which is really what I need. They are a little easier than closed cell foam to work with in a bottom entry hammock but not by much. They conform to the hammock better than CCF especially when underinflated. They are a bit on the heavy side by UL standards. The one drawback I struggle the most with inflateables is that they are useless if they fail/leak which could be a real safety issue.

    So that's where I'm at in my decision. It seems unanimous that the underquilts are highly favored. I'm curious how underquilt users feel about not being able to go to ground if it came down to it with just an underquilt and what your strategies are for those situations if they exist?

  7. #7
    neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryaex View Post
    Want to know how many of you that have bought underquilts have gone back to using a pad? and if so, why?
    A majority of the really experienced hammockers tend to be screaming at the top of their lungs that the underquilt is the only way to go.
    I'm wondering how Tom Claytor's hammock would work with a exped downmat inserted into the pad sleeve.

    For the record, I own a HH Explorer Ultralight, and am currently in the market for another hammock for the wife and am considering getting myself a down underquilt and them doing the exped in the mosquito hammock to see the pro's and con's of both.

    I want YOUR opinions on this.
    i have a tom claytor jungle hammock,when i kayak in the warmer months i use a 20 x 72 military ultralite thermarest,in colder moths i use a milatary 24 in wide closed cell pad trimmed down,i have used this pad down to 8.6 degrees,i love my claytor jungle hammock neo

  8. #8
    for any degree of warmth needed, a ccf pad will generally be lighter than anything including the best down underquilt. an underquilt can't be beat for comfort though.

    you could always carry a thinner shorter ccf pad for a ground situation and an underquilt as primary insul.

    [QUOTE=wamyteipen;28376]I
    1) Down underquilts seem to be the most comfortable and light weight of all the options but are limited because they are useless if you are forced to the ground and they are very expensive.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    I'd have to say the risks of a leak in an inflatable is pretty low especially in a hammock. I've been using one (Thermarest) ON THE GROUND often without a tent or groundsheet for more than 10 years without any issues ever...

    But I will agree that they aren't the lightest option.... still haven't tried it in the hammock.

  10. #10
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryaex View Post
    Want to know how many of you that have bought underquilts have gone back to using a pad? and if so, why?
    A majority of the really experienced hammockers tend to be screaming at the top of their lungs that the underquilt is the only way to go.
    I'm wondering how Tom Claytor's hammock would work with a exped downmat inserted into the pad sleeve.

    For the record, I own a HH Explorer Ultralight, and am currently in the market for another hammock for the wife and am considering getting myself a down underquilt and them doing the exped in the mosquito hammock to see the pro's and con's of both.

    I want YOUR opinions on this.
    Here comes the lonely voice again re: SuperShelter. Now that TeeDee is gone, I'm about the only fan left. Although, it seems to me there were one or two other lonely voices around here at one time, successful users of the SS. I know there were several fans over at whiteblaze. Anyway, it works for me by itself ( with Space blanket) into at least the mid/high 30's, and with adding stuff underneath I have taken it to the high teens. It is cheap and light for the warmth and wind/water protection it provides, IMO, but expensive for what you are actually buying. Just a little very fragile foam and nylon ( though custom fitted for HH ) compared to a nice down UQ or PeaPod, some of which can also be used for camp wear.

    Anyway, as I have stated elsewhere, on my recent Olympic trip, I carried pads for go to ground above timberline backup. And if I was in the Wyoming Rockies as is my norm, it would have also served as emergency back up in the hammock with my excellent SPE. I can assure you that with a Ridgerest/SPE+SS, you can go to way low temps.

    So I was going to leave the SuperShelter behind to save weight, as I was going to carry pads/SPE any way. But last minute comparisons convinced me that the SS was more comfortable, so I took both and lugged the weight. So far I have had to go to ground only 2 nights in the last 2 trips each a week long ( both nights were last year), and one of those was my first night EVER in a hammock and SS @ 22* on 1st of Sept. And that first night was due purely to user ignorance, not knowing how to use either hammock or SS + inability to get in my bag in the hammock. The 2nd time was because of camping @ a moonscape, zero trees. There were plentyy of trees just over Texas pass, but I did not have the strength ( altitude sickness) to hike over, and it was getting dark anyway. But in both cases, I was sure glad I had my pads. This year, a couple of weeks ago, it was all hammock bliss, as we stayed below timberline for camps and only day hiked higher.

    It would definitely save me some weight to just take the pads, but it would cost me some comfort. But I may switch someday. So far, I have not had any sweat issues with the pads/SPE, not noticeable anyway. And it feels plenty comfortable ( with just a CCF pad) under my upper body, if not quite as comfortable as no pad and a SS. My main problem seems to be with my feet and legs, and getting them positioned on the pad at a diagonal over the the ridge that always seems to form in the middle bottom of my hammock. Or if I'm lying straight, then that "ridge" tries to go up the middle of the pad. And it is not as convenient fiddling with all of this, as it is just lying down in my hammock. That "ridge" is my friend normally, it forms a sort of foot pocket and gives some support under my knees. It's in the way with a full length pad.

    But it seems to me that, if you go where I go and you are not a glutton for punishment, you have got to take a pad of some sort, in addition to whatever type UQ yo take. Because every now and then, you are simply not going to be able to find 2 adequate trees. And some of the places I go, staying mostly above tree line, trees would seldom be present. And what about on the AT? Are there any places, like GSMNP, that require you to stay in shelters? I don't know, just asking, but if so you better have a pad.

    OTOH, is it Slowhike who uses the an Exped insulated air mat ( with SPE?) and says it is actually MORE comfortable than the hammock alone? If so, that would sure be something to look into, as long as I was sure I could repair- on the trail- any leaks that might arise. Seems to me like Jeff once had to repeatedly inflate an air mattress on a winter trip, and there was a spate of folks who had leaks developed in their Big Agnes pads with hammock use.

    Good luck deciding on the multiple usable options!

    Bill
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 09-17-2007 at 09:48.

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