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  1. #1
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    Probably a Dumb Question...

    I've been doing a fair amount of research on hammock camping in cool/cold weather, and if I understand correctly, the primary problem with keeping warm is that air movement under the hammock will steal away warmth. That's one of the reasons why CC pads are so effective in keeping people warm. I bought a Claytor hammock and intend to buy the Speer SPE, but I was wondering about something that I don't recall seeing addressed here or the other forums.

    Has anyone tried wearing clothing that is advertised as windproof by the manufacturer? I see some clothing in Cabelas/Bass Pro/etc advertised as windproof, and user reviews rave about how warm they were even sitting on a deer stand for hours. Does anyone think this might help?

    I'm headed to Lake Lila late next month to do some camping, and I was thinking some windproof clothing would be useful.

  2. #2
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RickG55 View Post
    I've been doing a fair amount of research on hammock camping in cool/cold weather, and if I understand correctly, the primary problem with keeping warm is that air movement under the hammock will steal away warmth. That's one of the reasons why CC pads are so effective in keeping people warm. I bought a Claytor hammock and intend to buy the Speer SPE, but I was wondering about something that I don't recall seeing addressed here or the other forums.

    Has anyone tried wearing clothing that is advertised as windproof by the manufacturer? I see some clothing in Cabelas/Bass Pro/etc advertised as windproof, and user reviews rave about how warm they were even sitting on a deer stand for hours. Does anyone think this might help?

    I'm headed to Lake Lila late next month to do some camping, and I was thinking some windproof clothing would be useful.
    Welcome RickG55,

    Not a dumb question. The pad in your hammock will block any flow of air so I see no reason to use windproof clothing as an addition. It is then just a warmth issue and not a wind issue. If that made any sense. Plus your tarp will be deflecting alot of the wind if properly set-up.
    Last edited by FanaticFringer; 09-26-2007 at 22:22.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  3. #3
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanaticFringer View Post
    Welcome RickG55,

    Not a dumb question. The pad in your hammock will block any flow of air so I see no reason to use windproof clothing as an addition. It is then just a warmth issue and not a wind issue. If that made any sense. Plus your tarp will be deflecting alot of the wind if properly set-up.
    my thinking is that wind resistant clothing not only keeps wind at bay, but also reduces heat loss through radiation & convection (if i have my terminology right<g>).
    in other words, it helps create a protected environment that still allows water vapor to escape.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  4. #4
    slowhike's Avatar
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    welcome to HF rick. no, not a dumb question at all.
    yes the wind resistant clothes will help, but as temps drop, they can't replace insulation.
    i always consider my clothing system as part of my sleep system, especially in cold weather.
    i often wear a wind shirt to sleep in. it helps to keep moving air from whisking away the warm air layer next to your skin. but if it gets very cold, i'll probably add an insulating shirt of some type under it. ...tim
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  5. #5
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    Three basic modes of heat transfer...

    Conduction - what most of us typically see, and the main thing that insulation provides for, especially in houses.

    Convection - heat carried away by moving fluids (air or water) its essentially conduction to a gas that is then carried away by flow (wind, current) basically increasing the effective heat capacity of the fluid, since you never get to keep a warm layer close to you. Windproof or nearly windproof layers stop this. (Again we fight this with insulation and tight fitting/sealed systems.)

    Radiation - direct transfer of energy that doesn't require the heating or cooling of an intermediate substance. It can happen across a vacuum. the most common example would be sunshine. This is what reflective metalized films fight against, and why Aluminum foil will keep things warm or cold a long time. Even though its a very good conductor of heat, its terrible radiator.

  6. #6
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    ussually i throw my raingear on as part of my last ditch effort to stay warm in cold weather. you wouldnt want to wear it all the time and get used to it cause when it gets really cold it wont have the same effect. all in all the raingear doesnt do much for insulation though just keeps the air in your fleece, in your fleece. hope that made sense haha

  7. #7
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    The problem is that your heat loss is due to conduction with the hammock but the hammocks heat loss is due to convection.

    The moving air beneath the hammock will take heat out of the material that makes up the bottom of the hammock via convection. That cold material will in turn take the heat out of whatever is in direct contact with it via conduction.

    I would think that unless you had a barrier that resisted conduction (the CC pad) that the windproof clothing would simply act as another path for the heat to move from you to the hammocks bottom. It all comes back to creating that dead air space between you and the wind through the use of a CC pad or an underquilt or some other method.


    Of course thats all theory. Ive got no real world experience with cold weather hammock camping.

  8. #8
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    Inimicus has it pretty much right as far as bottom insulation goes. The extra "insulation" where its pressed against the hammock is minimal (how thick is a wind shirt?) The place you really need the wind protection is on the outside of the hammock... Hence double layer hammocks, underquilts, SS, hammock bags/socks, etc...

  9. #9
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapt View Post
    Inimicus has it pretty much right as far as bottom insulation goes. The extra "insulation" where its pressed against the hammock is minimal (how thick is a wind shirt?) The place you really need the wind protection is on the outside of the hammock... Hence double layer hammocks, underquilts, SS, hammock bags/socks, etc...
    i understand what you're saying about the importance of wind protection on the out side (protected location, tarp, something to protect the hammock & it's insulation like a weather shield) & i agree.
    but a simple wind shirt either worn alone or over an insulating layer, makes a very real difference every time a draft finds it's way into the quilt.
    not to mention how much easier it makes getting up for that middle of the night bath room break
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    ...a simple wind shirt either worn alone or over an insulating layer, makes a very real difference every time a draft finds it's way into the quilt.
    not to mention how much easier it makes getting up for that middle of the night bath room break
    Yep. Same idea... Keeps the air exchange in the insulating layer you're wearing to a minimum... Especially if you get up in the night. Polar fleece is exceptionally warm, and completely NOT windproof, so the slightest draft makes it cold. For that kind of thing a windproof layer is almost essential.

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