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  1. #11
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    just looping the rope around the biner will be enough to keep it from slipping off the biner?
    I normally wrap it around the biner 2 to 4 times and never had a problem. The more times you wrap the harder it is to slide but the more it locks in. Just test a couple times to find the right # of wraps for your rope

  2. #12
    Rat's Avatar
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    A properly tied Taught-line (also called the Rolling hitch) will not slip. Having said that, most people I see do not use the proper taught-line hitch, it is a less secure variant and I am knot sure it even has a name. For the proper way to tie the taught-line the second hitch should be tucked over the first and held against the loaded rope/cord like this cool animation shows.

    Having said that, the Taught line hitch may not be the best to use here for another reason. It is used where the load is constant (constant tension, like a tarp fly) it can easily become untied getting into and out of the hammock because of the loading and unloading of the rope. In very flexible rope I don't think it would pose a problem, but stiffer hi-tec ropes may not handle it as well. Best to experiment gingerly.

    A Bowline is a great knot, commonly refered to as "The King of Knots" because of it's ease of tying, ease of untying and no-bind properties. If tied with a slip at the end it is also much easier to untie than normal. It will bind on large diameter ropes with a hollow core, especially if a large load is applied forcefully; like a heavy weight dropped to the end of the rope. But this is more a quality of the rope and not the knot itself.

    The better knot, IMO, is the one Warbonnetguy posted in the other thread, the Mooring Hitch. It is a sliding (take up slack like the Taught line), locking (locks down tight once you have the sag adjusted), exploding hitch (one pull and the thing comes apart easily). It is one of my top ten essential knots to know and I use it for a variety of things, including mooring my boat . It is more complicated, but once you learn it it takes about the same time as a bowline to tie and another second or two to lock once it is set. And since I have used it on my HH I know it works well with that type of rope. The only real problem (with the HH set up) is that you can't get the suspension really tight like with a Trucker's hitch or something similar.
    "I aim to misbehave." - Capt. Mal Reynolds
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  3. #13
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    an exploding knot, i like the sound of that.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Nest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hogn8r View Post
    A properly tied Taught-line (also called the Rolling hitch) will not slip. Having said that, most people I see do not use the proper taught-line hitch, it is a less secure variant and I am knot sure it even has a name. For the proper way to tie the taught-line the second hitch should be tucked over the first and held against the loaded rope/cord like this cool animation shows.
    I'm an Eagle Scout, and taught the knot class in my troop for years. I know how to tie a proper taughtline, and with the right line they will slip. Just not enough friction. Either needs more wraps, or a way to pull the rope at more of an angle. The two lines are still to close the parallel to create a good reliable lock under heavy loads.

  5. #15
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    Thanks for the info Cerberus -and everyone else who contributed to answering my question. The neat thing about this forum is that I get to learn things without having to hit the ground in a self-experiment.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Nest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    Thanks for the info Cerberus -and everyone else who contributed to answering my question. The neat thing about this forum is that I get to learn things without having to hit the ground in a self-experiment.

    Well, if you did use a taughtline, and it did happen to slip it would be a fun ride down. Nice and slow like an elevator.

  7. #17
    Rat's Avatar
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    Well, I am not an Eagle Scout, so I had to look it up. Here is what i found: http://www.troop7.org/Knots/Tautline.html And guess what? This is not a Taught line hitch. It is one of the variants of it known simply as an adjustable hitch.

    Ashley Book of Knots goes into some detail about this and ascribes the Adjustable hitch (both variants) to the Taught line hitch (Which he calls the Midshipman's hitch [#1799]. He also goes on to say that the Midshipman's is the superior by far over the variants. Which is why we use it to anchor sheets and such, it will not slip and is easily adjusted.

    The animation I posted earlier shows this hitch (the Midshipman's/Taught line) being tied, not the variant. If you tie the Taught line (Midshipman's) hitch correctly it will not slip, no matter what cord you use.

    The Taught line hitch wikepedia has all of the Ashley information plus some extra stuff about it that is really good as we..
    Taught line Wikepedia

    I am not knocking the BSA or your achievemants. The BSA is a fine organization and becoming an Eagle Scout is wicked cool. I'm just a knot freak who has too much time on his hands.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member cavediver2's Avatar
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    Knots

    I use a bowline knot but put a bow in it so that I can pull it back out just like what they did in the book for Clark hammocks.

    I am a Millwright by trade and use that not to control very very heavy things in at a gross wieght of 10,000 or more pounds and never have I had problems getting it lose the way that they show in the book. a couple of times I have had to use a hammer to break it over to get loose if I did'nt put that little bow in it to finish it off.

    Taughtline's will create slack over time and you always have to play with them to stop it unless you put a stopper knot behind it and then you are createing havic by doing so because now you dont have much to play with in adjustment.

    I am useing slapstraps and beaners as well and it works well if you dont want to use a bowline knot you might try a alpine butterfly knot in different locations on the big rope to the hammock I have done that before with other hammock setups in a since you are making a slapstap deal out of you main lines with lopes allong the main rope to give a connection point were ever you want it. works real well

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavediver2 View Post
    I use a bowline knot but put a bow in it so that I can pull it back out just like what they did in the book for Clark hammocks.

    I am useing slapstraps and beaners as well and it works well if you dont want to use a bowline knot you might try a alpine butterfly knot in different locations on the big rope to the hammock I have done that before with other hammock setups in a since you are making a slapstap deal out of you main lines with lopes allong the main rope to give a connection point were ever you want it. works real well
    I did the same thing - bowline with easy untie bow, carabiners, and slap straps. I brought up the tautline hitch to see if it could be used as a sliding adjuster rather than using the set loops in the slap straps or retying the bowline for adjustments.

    Adding Alpine knots is interesting but I always thought that a knot reduced break strength by 10% to 50%, depending on the type of knot. I realize the very reason for the Alpine knot is that it is supposed to be at the low end of decreasing break strength, but if you tied enough of them might you not weaken your support line to the point of being dangeous?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hogn8r View Post
    Rolling hitch... cool animation
    That's what I meant by a stopper knot. You can use more than two or three locked turns to make it even more secure. It will not slip. Years ago, I employed that knot often when I was mate on an offshore utility vessel handling strange rigs for research scientists in the North Atlantic.

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