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  1. #21
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    Hrm...that's surprising.

    Re: sewing directly to the body, I haven't had problems with my down hammock.
    The pad that slips around is a Thermarest Prolite. I think it has a slippery bottom. Maybe there's something I can put on it to help it stick better.

    I noticed that Evazote doesn't slip much at all on my hammock's ripstop. So I made a pad layer that doesn't slip. Joined 2 1/8" thick 20"x60" Evazote pads along their long edge, put a layer of insul-brite on top of that, and covered the top with a layer of DWR rip-stop. Sewed along the edges. The top is rip-stop, the bottom exposed Evazote. That pad stays put, inside.

    On your down hammock it appears that the stitching crosses the main stress line at right angles. That's good data, because that's the concern with sewing on a pad pocket on a bridge.

    Grizz

  2. #22
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanaticFringer View Post
    That's an understatement. I use a 24" wide wally world pad in my JRB bridge and it does not move around in the pad pocket. No buckling and other pains associated with pads in traditional hammocks. I'm looking for a 26" wide pad so I can use the maximum width the pad pocket allows. I tell you I am just as comfy with a pad(s) than with an underquilt in this hammock. I am finally able to sleep well on my back in a hammock. Pure bliss.
    Yep, I've been out enough nights now with different sorts of pads to know that in the 40-15 degree range I can sleep comfortably using pads only. A bonus of the layered body approach is that I keep the main (narrow) pad and the side protection (wide) out of the space I sleep in. Will have to see if I have condensation problems when things are warmer, and have to wait until things get cold again to see how low I can go. When temps drop below 15 again I think I'll try pad + quilt.

    Grizz

  3. #23
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greggg3 View Post
    Grizz, TeeDee, anyone:

    If I wanted to put a pad sleeve on a bridge hammock, should I just make it with 2 full layers, or could I sew a sleeve just the width of the pad (like 20" wide). Didn't know what you thought about the stich holes weakening the nylon. I'd like to somehow get a sort of trapazoidal cross section with a thermarest for the bottom, any ideas?

    Would it work to just sew a pad sleeve with webbing on the edges, then run different lengths of webbing up to the suspension cord on each side (like a real suspension bridge, the pad sleeve being the bridge deck). Fill in the sides with netting or something later? Sorta like this (viewed from the side):


    |__|__|__|


    Even if this worked it would probably be a real mess of tangled webbing when I took it down huh??
    Another thought...something that is more in line with what you described...
    You don't need to make a full-up second body, you can make one just large enough to hold the pad. The second body has parabolic cuts like the main hammock. In this picture and this one the underbody just uses bias tape on the long edges, ends in loops, with cord to go to the rings.

    Grizz

  4. #24
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    On your down hammock it appears that the stitching crosses the main stress line at right angles. That's good data, because that's the concern with sewing on a pad pocket on a bridge.
    Yep - it's just a rectangle. I used a zigzag stitch to allow for stretching, and I sewed the whole perimeter in one length to minimize backstitching. The one backstitch is at the head end on the side I don't lay on...that way I can easily monitor it for problems and it's in a low-stress place on the body.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
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    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  5. #25
    Senior Member greggg3's Avatar
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    Griz, while I can see lots of advantages to your 2nd seperate layer, I was hoping to use a snug fitting pad pocket to help flatten out the bottom - maybe thats unrealistic due to the stresses (would it just fold up a tightly inflated theremarest)? What do you think?

    Another question, do you think a pole pocket with webbing like this would work to hold the handle end of a hiking pole? (this was just a test job, each tail would get folded and bar tacked to the main support webbing) I wasn't sure how critical it was to hold the pole in the centerline of the main support webbing - is that why everyone uses rings in the spreader configuration?

    I noticed on your's, you actually made cut outs on the head end to keep the pole down in the line of the support webbing (as opposed to sewing on webbing tabs or ears that extend up, which would impose some moment on the hiking pole along with the axial compression. For example, if you trimmed one end of this web pocket I was experimenting with and sewed the other end to the support webbing so that the pocket extended up above the support webbing)
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  6. #26
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greggg3 View Post
    Griz, while I can see lots of advantages to your 2nd seperate layer, I was hoping to use a snug fitting pad pocket to help flatten out the bottom - maybe thats unrealistic due to the stresses (would it just fold up a tightly inflated theremarest)? What do you think?
    The only way I can see a pad helping to flatten the bottom is if either the pad is inside the hammock (and so is pushing out the walls) or in a pocket that is structrually affixed to the body. My experience with pads between layers (include a Big Fat downmat) has not been that the floor gets flatter. Users of the JRB BMBH report that the walls get a bit further apart when they put a stiff pad in it's pocket.

    Another question, do you think a pole pocket with webbing like this would work to hold the handle end of a hiking pole? (this was just a test job, each tail would get folded and bar tacked to the main support webbing) I wasn't sure how critical it was to hold the pole in the centerline of the main support webbing - is that why everyone uses rings in the spreader configuration?
    Those look great....provided you get them centered with respect to the suspension lines, such as in a ring. My earliest efforts with the poles had them sort of on top of the suspension because I hadn't figured out a way to get them centered yet. With materials other than the poles I've seen remarkable bending when they were not aligned with the forces. But with rings you're good.

    I noticed on your's, you actually made cut outs on the head end to keep the pole down in the line of the support webbing (as opposed to sewing on webbing tabs or ears that extend up, which would impose some moment on the hiking pole along with the axial compression. For example, if you trimmed one end of this web pocket I was experimenting with and sewed the other end to the support webbing so that the pocket extended up above the support webbing)
    see above. Keep the pole centered on the forces and you'll sleep more easily. Well, I will anyway, for your sake. I can imagine different ways to accomplish this. E.g. loop your pocket tabs over two separate lines of spectra. Skip the ring on the handle side, instead tie ends of the two lines to a terminating loop in the webbing. On the other side just tie the two lines of spectra together. Now, even if your pole handle was too large to fit through a ring, you've created a sort of flexible ring so that it can. Deal with the tip in like fashion, or put in a ring with a spectra nest like I've done...centered forces, peaceful airborne nights.

    Now WalkingBear had another way to center the force on the poles and that was to use symmetry. He build a pair of pockets like yours, one went above the suspension line and the other below. But then there's the foot end of the hammock....

    on the recessed spreader bar. That's a nice way to get more spread where you need it for less width of spreader bar. Shorter spreader bar means less compression force, and less width to manage under a tarp. I found that designing bugnets and overcovers for the hammock was considerably more complicated with this arrangement though, and in the current version went back to spreaders at the very end. As I worry now about the width of the spreader bars under tarps, the recessed ones are looking good again! There are lots of tradeoffs to manage with this thing.

    Grizz

  7. #27
    Senior Member Walking Bear's Avatar
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    I have tried the self inflating thermorest in the double layer bridge. It is nice and soft and helps make it feel wider. However, I don't want to carry the pad because of the weight.

    Pole pocket:
    I have made a pole pocket similar to what you have. I sewed it to the webbing on one side. The other was attached to a secondary piece of webbing that was sewn to the hammock body webbing. The pole goes between the webbing and seems to have no latteral forces. For the tip of the pole I placed 2" section of tubing in it with a hole drilled in one side for the tip to go into.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Bear View Post
    I have tried the self inflating thermorest in the double layer bridge. It is nice and soft and helps make it feel wider. However, I don't want to carry the pad because of the weight.

    Pole pocket:
    I have made a pole pocket similar to what you have. I sewed it to the webbing on one side. The other was attached to a secondary piece of webbing that was sewn to the hammock body webbing. The pole goes between the webbing and seems to have no latteral forces. For the tip of the pole I placed 2" section of tubing in it with a hole drilled in one side for the tip to go into.

    what size webbing are you using on that? is that 1/2"

  9. #29
    neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkwater View Post
    Got the stuff together to sew a bridge hammock but have a couple easy questions. What is the optimum cat cut for an 8 footer? & optimum spreader bar length? Thanks
    the bridge hammock is definately not for me neo
    the matrix has you

  10. #30
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo View Post
    the bridge hammock is definately not for me neo
    Don't be so hasty neo. Did you see this one that HANGnOUT made?
    Has a double body, just like the jungle hammock. In camo, just like the jungle hammock. Easy enough to include a bug net, it could even be made to look just like the Claytor.

    but you would have to learn to sew. I bet you could get Mule to make one for you!



    Making one in camo is in my building plan for the spring also.

    Grizz

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