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  1. #1

    Polyester vs. polypropylene webbing

    I need to make a few more tree huggers. What is the difference between using polyester vs. polypropylene webbing? I did a search of the forums, but couldn't come up an answer.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member ikemouser's Avatar
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    search function my friend. Polypro is lighter with more stretch.

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    Member Dalton's Avatar
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    i went through all the threads and settled on polyester.
    theres like no stretch and i dont think its that much heavier than polypro.

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    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Polyester is the only thing I use. I've got a couple of PolyPro suspensions, but have never really used them beyond messing around in the backyard. They (PolyPro) do stretch, but nothing like nylon.
    Trust nobody!

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    Bubba's Avatar
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    I remember reading somewhere that polypro stretches but does not shrink back the way nylon does. Once stretched out it stays that way. I could be wrong though.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ikemouser View Post
    search function my friend. Polypro is lighter with more stretch.
    Ahh, your post was the key...I was searching "polypropylene" and not "polypro"

    Helps to know the lingo.

    Thanks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member kitesurfer's Avatar
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    polypropoline has initial stretch and then never again. It's used for straps for securing kayaks to your roof rack because it will not stretch like nylon when it rains. but polypropoline will fray with use as in 'not abrasion resistant' and sunlight will also degrade the material where nylon will last forever.

  8. #8
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    The polyester webbing that I use is the same as the 1" camo webbing that AHE sells, with a dotted line down the middle. Sometimes it comes with a dotted line down each edge, and it feels a tad heavier. Still, it's lighter than polypropylene and far stronger.
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Browny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitesurfer View Post
    polypropoline has initial stretch and then never again. It's used for straps for securing kayaks to your roof rack because it will not stretch like nylon when it rains. but polypropoline will fray with use as in 'not abrasion resistant' and sunlight will also degrade the material where nylon will last forever.
    Ooooops! Not quite. Nylon absorbs water and stretches, and degrades substantially with prolonged uv exposure. Just ask my nylon monofilament fishing line!
    I dream of a better tomorrow, where chickens can cross the road and not be questioned about their motives.

  10. #10
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    The words 'stretch' and 'recover' have some complexity to them. I recall reading about it on one the information pages of a rope manufacturer a few years back but don't remember all the details; but there are several different categories of stretch and recovery. The simplification I stored in memory is that for stretch there are fast, slower, and really slow components. For recovery there are fast, slow, really slow, and some that never happens. The different materials have different 'amounts' of these.

    The point I am getting to is you may use polypropylene and find that it slowly stretches all night long. If you use it before that type of stretch recovers you will have gotten that stretch out but if you give it time for that to recover it will slowly stretch during the night again. Polyester is much better in that regard for hammock suspensions. How much stretch you get is also a factor of the percentage loading you apply, for example, loading 200 pounds on a 1000 pound rated polypropylene webbing will stretch more than loading 200 pounds on a 2000 pound rated polypropylene webbing.
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