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  1. #1
    Member Nudgeworth's Avatar
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    Tieing two lengths of webbing together

    Hello again fella's.

    I have found that my hammocks webbing is too short (only 10' each).
    can i safely use a knot like the double sheet bend to attach an extension?

    an

  2. #2
    slowhike's Avatar
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    you might get by w/ it depending on what kind of webbing it is etc, but i would feel better about just replacing it w/ a new, longer length of webbing.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nudgeworth View Post
    Hello again fella's.

    I have found that my hammocks webbing is too short (only 10' each).
    can i safely use a knot like the double sheet bend to attach an extension?

    an
    If your webbing is rated for at least 1000 lb. (450 kg), then this knot will be fine, it has a knot strength of 80%, so if you start out with 1000# webbing you should have at least 750# strength at the knot.

    http://www.animatedknots.com/waterkn...mage=&Website=

  4. #4
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    I agree, the Water Knot is the best way to join webbing. While Grog mentions it in the text he doesn't show it in the animation, I would recommend a stopper knot each bitter end to keep it from slipping back through. While this knot is pretty secure for a static load it will slip with repeated loading and unloading (like getting in and out of a hammock), especially if the webbing is very tight weave and slickery. Best to tie off the ends with stoppers.

    It can also be hard to untie after being loaded. You can use a tent stake as a marlinspike to get it undone tho.
    "I aim to misbehave." - Capt. Mal Reynolds
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  5. #5
    Member Nudgeworth's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, my webbing more than strong enough, lol.
    I've thought about it, and I might invest in some tree hugger's.
    I'll just run the current webbing through the huggers and tie it off with a mooring hitch.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Tying flat webbing in knots has a different impact on strength than tying rope or cord in knots. Flat webbing is meant to be relatively flat when supporting its load...twists and turns in a knot can put most of the force on one edge of the webbing, for example, which can cause it to tear. I'd be careful with knots in webbing...some will be fine, but others won't.
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  7. #7
    Member Nudgeworth's Avatar
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    Hmm, thanks Jeff, more food for thought, I'll remember that
    The webbing I have has breaking point of one and a half tonne. So I might get away with it.
    But I may just buy a new set of longer webbing. It could be safer lol

  8. #8
    the water knot is commonly used in rock climbing to tie webbing together. it's probably the best choice, but knots are bulky, and sewn is always stronger. if you are doing this b/c you want to use what you've got, you could just sew the two pieces together instead of tying them.

    www.owfinc.com has some great polyester that is really light and stretches very little. it's the best i've come across actually, and it's not too expensive, but i see you are from nz, so i'm sure shipping costs are probably the main expense.

  9. #9
    Brian's Avatar
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    If you are looking for a permanent lengthening, doing a fair amount of stitching (X shapes and boxes on the outside) would be a very strong, natural looking way to lengthen the line. I would think that doubling back the original line would work just fine, but would definately want to test it to be sure.

    Brian

  10. #10
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    Sewn is also slightly lighter 'cause it uses about 6 inches less webbing than a water knot. Climbers use it to place one of those SMC rings (like we use on our hammocks) on a tubular runner for setting up rappels. A knot can usually be undone if need be.

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