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  1. #11
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    Peanut butter, cheese, something with some nice fat content. Some good complex carbs too. And walk around a bit swinging your arms - a short, brisk stroll and a hot water Nalgene go a long way.... I usually try to change the minute we stop for the day, before temps go down, and either wash in the creek or take a wet wipe bath before putting on some nice clean clothes and warm socks for the night. (I'm frequently out where the temps are below freezing more often than not...) Hot tea/cocoa, hot broth, some hot food, gloves, and a good fleece hat/balaclava help a lot.

  2. #12
    Senior Member turnerminator's Avatar
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    Its a proven fact that its very difficult to go to sleep when the body's core temperature is rising. If you are cold, and then start warming up in your hammock, you won't get to sleep quickly.
    Once the core temp reaches a point, circulation is increased and blood flows to the cold extremities, which cools the core down again slightly. At this point, I find I doze off easily.
    Since I learnt that things work this way, I find it much easier to get to sleep.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Law Dawg (ret)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shug View Post
    I took cold medicine once before hammock time and was cold.
    Shug
    That reminds; Do any of y'all carry Benadryl tabs for congestion, bug bite reaction, etc? One of these will knock me right out and a little chill will not even be noticed.

    Food; Cold weather folk (like Eskimos) eat tons of calories with a high fat content. I know MRE winter meals are very high in calories just for that reason. Hydration is king all year and in all climes even some added electrolytes are good. This from a motorcyclist that likes to push the envelope for his body. Went to Death Valley in August once (just because) and ride all year. I know Kalifornia ain't Minn. but it does have cold spots, especially when you factor in road speed wind chill.

    Winter chill is one area where us, ahem...full figured folk finally have an advantage.
    Mark is the name and If there is more than one way to understand what I just said....I meant the good one.

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  4. #14
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    The rules I've lived by for years of cold weather camping or hunting. Eat, drink warm fluids, and eat some more. Small meals or snacks regularly will take you further then one big meal every 6 to 8 hours, I find myself snacking constantly in cold weather.

    I've slept out on the ground down to minus 15 before and had a warm sleep. However I've neglected to snack and drink enough in 70 degree weather before as the night temps dropped to the 50's and froze. I also think sweaty clothes will make you freeze at night too, I either have dry clothes on by changing or head home. Like all the others say a Balaclava along with a stocking cap or insulated hood will help too.
    I'm Popeye the hammock man I'll be in the woods again, by the end of the day tomorrow I pray I'll be in a hammock man. toot toot..

  5. #15
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    In addition to the above one thing Ed told me seems to help also is to put a piece of plastic between the underquilt and the hammock - I use a contractors bag in my pack and I spread this out under my torso area at night if its going to get below freezing

    Other things I agree with - hot water Nalgene is worth its weight in gold on a cold night - put it in your crotch up against the femoral arteries - see thread on hot water bottles; I find taking my socks off at night helps me keep my feet warm (insert glove vs mitten analogy here) - rubbing one foot on the other to warm them up works better for me without the socks; head coverage - I use a down balaclava for cold nights along with possibly other knit hats - a big plus IMO

  6. #16
    Senior Member Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    . . . I know exercising a little before getting into bed has been suggested, along with eating something so your body has something to burn. .
    Quote Originally Posted by Raul Perez View Post
    The times I was cold were the times I went to bed barely satisfied with food or water. When I was well fed I was cozy in cold temps. .
    One thing to remember is:
    Repeated eating before bed, over time/years
    will develop into an acid reflux issue. . . .

    and that could in turn develop into bronchial pneumonia if not realized.

    Check it out for sure . . .
    Bradley SaintJohn
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  7. #17
    mbiraman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canoebie View Post
    I think the number one way to thwart cold is to be properly hydrated. If fully hydrated, your body is producing and retaining the maximum of amount of blood. If dehydrated, less blood means inadequate circulation, constricted vessels, etc.

    The one and only time I became seriously hypothermic, I stopped paddling, in a blizzard, 40 mph winds, 18 degrees and blinding snow to "warm up". I could not remember how to tie a knot, and most important, I didn't care. I was disoriented and seriously cold.
    I'll try not to complain about being cold when i paddle again.(-;
    " The mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

    “The measure of your life will not be in what you accumulate, but in what you give away.” ~Wayne Dyer

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  8. #18
    canoebie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradley View Post
    One thing to remember is:
    Repeated eating before bed, over time/years
    will develop into an acid reflux issue. . . .

    and that could in turn develop into bronchial pneumonia if not realized.

    Check it out for sure . . .
    Good point, moderation is key.
    Revolution is about the need to re-evolve political, economic and social justice and power back into the hands of the people, preferably through legislation and policies that make human sense. That's what revolution is about. Revolution is not about shootouts.

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  9. #19
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    Never really thought about the effects of eating/drinking before turning in for the night, but last night my son and I decided to spend a night "hanging out" in the woods.
    We ate a good meal about an hour before hitting the hammocks, and had plenty to drink (hot green tea & water). I was up a couple times during the night to "water the trees" and had a cup of fresh brewed coffee the first time (while I listened to a screech owl serenading us), and a drink of water the second time up.
    My son slept through (9:00PM to 7:30AM) without ever getting out of his hammock. (he's 10 and I'm 59) Looks like youth has the advantage on hydration and being able to sleep all night.

    Our lowest temps yet for hammock camping (mid 40s), and we both slept warm and comfortably.
    wabi

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by canoebie View Post
    Good point, moderation is key.
    Some of us are lucky and get to do 2-6 nights backpacking per month. A lot of folks go a lot less than that. Sounds fairly moderate to me.

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