Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Grinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    winter haven, florida
    Posts
    614
    Images
    19

    let's talk "down-proof"

    I swear this onion has more layers then infinity.

    After working my way through the fact that I NEED down to be warm and have it pack up small enough, I now catch the hint that only special nylons are suitable for down.

    What are the details of this need. I have lots of ripstop in inventory and had planned on picking the most pleasing colors to make my underquilt. Now, it appears that some, if not all of it may not be worthy.

    If I use ripstop 1.1 oz (the sclittlefield material of a year or so back) is it "down proof"?

    This visual identification of material is the hardest part of this DIY business for me to get my head around.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
    grinder

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cold Butt Stephen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Hammock
    SL 1.1 oz DIY
    Tarp
    DIY Sil Hex
    Insulation
    Frankenpad
    Suspension
    DIY whoopie slings
    Posts
    157
    Images
    14
    I have to admit I don't know much about downproofing either, but I do know that while the 1.1 ripstop that he is currently selling on backwoods daydreamer says that it is downproof (I just bought some), other 1.1 ripstops on the site don't say they are. He has had really great service so far, so if you PM him he might be able to tell you for sure.

    Here's an article with some interesting, but conflicting information that might help.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/a...p/t-21816.html
    ------------------------------------------------------

    CBS (Cold Butt Stephen)

  3. #3
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    Custom OES tarp
    Insulation
    JRB Down UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie slings
    Posts
    9,041
    Images
    40
    I'm pretty sure it's downproof, he would tell you if it weren't. I've had some loose weave ripstop once that was not downproof, but it was a fairly unusual material. I think you'll be ok.


    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
    - Mark Twain
    I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.
    - John Burroughs

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lonely Raven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bolingbrook, IL
    Hammock
    WarbonnetBlackbird
    Tarp
    Olive Superfly
    Insulation
    Incubat Dempsey TQ
    Suspension
    Stock Webbing
    Posts
    1,516
    Ripstop is made "downproof" by a process called calendering. Basically it's rolled through a heated roller that sort of cooks one side of the material to help close up the weave.

    If your ripstop looks satin finish on one side and simi-gloss on the other, it's probably calendered.

  5. #5
    Senior Member nacra533's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hartwell, GA
    Hammock
    DIY dbl 1.1
    Tarp
    DIY hex
    Insulation
    DIY 3 season tq+uq
    Suspension
    webbing, again
    Posts
    585
    Images
    26
    I just use regular ole 1.1 ripstop with a DWR coating. It definitely is not calendared. If it will hold water without pressure, it SHOULD be down proof. I haven't had any problems with down coming out. If you have any "feathers", they might poke through.

    Stretch it across your sink and put some water in it. If it pools up, it should hold the down.

  6. #6
    sclittlefield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Northern woods of Maine
    Hammock
    It's a Secret.
    Tarp
    BWDD Winter Dream
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Slings
    Posts
    1,437
    Images
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Lonely Raven View Post
    Ripstop is made "downproof" by a process called calendering. Basically it's rolled through a heated roller that sort of cooks one side of the material to help close up the weave.

    If your ripstop looks satin finish on one side and simi-gloss on the other, it's probably calendered.
    Well said Raven, and actually, calendaring is most often done to both sides - and DWR is more often one side - both (in most cases) will downproof your fabric.

    The Olive Green and Gray 1.1oz ripstop we currently carry is downproof. The Woodland Camo uncoated is not.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

  7. #7
    MarshLaw303's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Winona, MN
    Hammock
    11' gathered end
    Tarp
    Flat
    Insulation
    Revolt/Rev
    Suspension
    Whoopies
    Posts
    357
    is there really a big difference with 800+ fills as they are 90%+ clusters? Or is the issue as i suspect with the lower fills that are much more feathers and spines?

    I can't see the 800+ getting out of too many fabrics, heck noseeum would give it a run sometimes i think.

    -Tim

  8. #8
    Dblcorona's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Novi, MI
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 DBL
    Tarp
    HG Cuben
    Insulation
    Sleeping BearTQ/UQ
    Suspension
    Straps and Slings
    Posts
    1,142
    Images
    18
    is there really a big difference with 800+ fills as they are 90%+ clusters? Or is the issue as i suspect with the lower fills that are much more feathers and spines?

    I can't see the 800+ getting out of too many fabrics, heck noseeum would give it a run sometimes i think.
    I was looking at this too. I think the issue becomes, not how down proof, but how wind proof it is. If the weave hasn't been tightened up enough, the wind flow through the fabric would play heck with the insulating power we come to expect.
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

    -- Finis Mitchell,

  9. #9
    Dutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Reinholds, PA
    Hammock
    Bridgeskin
    Tarp
    DIY Blackcat
    Insulation
    DIY Quilts
    Suspension
    Whoopie sling
    Posts
    6,738
    Images
    198
    I have made quilts from walmart nylon that wasn't calendered or treated and the down did not escape. I worry more about water and wind getting in than down getting out. I think the quality of down we often use helps prevent it getting out. I do see a tiny bit of down escape all materials i use and other manufacturers.
    Peace Dutch
    GA>ME 2003


    http://dutchwaregear.com
    Visit Dutchwaregear on facebook (and like it)
    Check us out on Twitter @dutchwaregear

  10. #10
    sclittlefield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Northern woods of Maine
    Hammock
    It's a Secret.
    Tarp
    BWDD Winter Dream
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Slings
    Posts
    1,437
    Images
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Dblcorona View Post
    I was looking at this too. I think the issue becomes, not how down proof, but how wind proof it is. If the weave hasn't been tightened up enough, the wind flow through the fabric would play heck with the insulating power we come to expect.
    This is a major factor that is often missed. Thanks for bringing it up.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-28-2014, 16:53
  2. what costitutes "down-proof" rip stop???
    By the_gr8t_waldo in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-10-2012, 15:37
  3. Hancock Fabric "Down" Proof
    By wwk10 in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-06-2011, 16:39
  4. More "Water Proof/Breathable"
    By BillyBob58 in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-28-2010, 06:05

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •