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  1. #1
    New Member Sai Bashi's Avatar
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    Jan 2011
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    Sleeping Pad or not

    Do most people use a sleeping pad or do you fill its comfortable enough without one, is it worth the extra weight
    I have a Clark nx250 Hammock, just trying to get other people thought on the subject, thanks
    Last edited by Sai Bashi; 04-24-2011 at 16:35. Reason: title confusing

  2. #2
    Senior Member Timberrr's Avatar
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    Jan 2011
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    Orlando (okay, nearrr Orlando)
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    I didn't use to use a pad. The idea of sleeping on some sort of plastic or foam rubber just didn't appeal to me. Then I was wandering around Sports Authority a few months back and they had an end cap display of half-priced yoga mats. They're fleece on one side and breath wonderfully. They roll up easily and don't weigh too much (for me and my kayak). So now I use a mat and I sleep better.
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    So many trees, so little time...


  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Somewhere near Parkville, MO
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    Hammocks are comfortable without the pad. On the other hand, if the temps go below 70 degrees you'll start getting cold without some kind of insulation. Pads are the old standby. Pea Pods and underquilts and a bunch of other things are all the rage, but because you can use it for more then just sleeping on, pads are a very useful option.

    Rhetoric of course, I haven't done anything other then hang in my bedroom and I'm good till the upper 50's without a pad there.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2010
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    Framingham, MA
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    Even with a sleeping bag you will need some sort of insulation beneath you. This is because your body weight squashes the SB insulation flat, making it more or less useless. A Walmart blue sleeping pad from the comping section will only cost ca. $6 and will give you sufficient insulation down close to freezing. It weighs less than 1 lb, is waterproof and rolled is not much larger than any other insulation. You can also use it as a sit pad on the trail and in camp. Very versatile, very effective and costs next to nothing, What's not to like?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Rolloff's Avatar
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    Dec 2010
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    Leveland
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    Pads are often used on a first set up, when dollars might be a little short for a nice Under Quilt. You often have access to a good enough Sleeping bag already, to put off the immediate investment of an Over Quilt. Pads are cheap and you might even have one from ground dweller days.

    Many of the Ultralite packs call for a piece of foam or CCF for a back pad, and some even use a loosely rolled or folded pad as a sort of internal frame, so once you do purchase an UQ, you just might find yourself dragging at least part of the darn thing along with you anyway. They make great sit pads, or additional footbox insulation. Being a multi-use item it's easy to make room for some sort of pad on most pack lists.

    The hammock can be a "total confort" item. While pads work as they were designed, for some, they may take away a small part of that aspect. UQ's are easier to get a good fit. They may take some initial "tweeking" but once there, usually stay that way with little or no further adjustment needed. For some, every time they wake up, they'll find their pad in a different position. UQ's once well fitted usually eliminate that altogether.

    A good low priced hammock/suspension, the 30-40 degree SB you may already have, and a 6 dollar WW Blue CCF pad. can tell you enough about whether hanging is going to be for you, to suck you in pretty fast if it is.

    If so, enjoy a set up like this as long as you can, with the full knowledge, that when you decide to upgrade, it won't get any cheaper.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member SwampFoot's Avatar
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    Feb 2008
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    Nashville , North Carolina
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    I have tried alot of pads and (not over night) laid in a hammock without one , in my opinion the hammock feels better with out something semi hard in it , I am going to an underquilt...I just tested out a new WBBB 1.7 DL and used a thermarest ridgerest foam pad..it was ok and it formed to my body but heres the issue with me...I try to stay on the pad and when my foot comes off and feels fabric it makes me mentally feel like I am going to fall off because of the difference between hard and soft...also , a down underquilt packs smaller and is warmer....even in the summer months with 75 degree nights you will get cold...it doesnt take much...anyway , I hope this helps.
    Chris Duke aka SWAMP FOOT

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bubba's Avatar
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    I find underquilts to be the most comfortable insulation option. Even in warm temperatures your back can get cool as others have said. Pads are effective if you don't want to spend the money. There are synthetic underquilts that are a little less expensive but the do not pack as small and light as down. If you are thinking about three season outdoor use, then some kind of insulation would be a good idea.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  8. #8
    gunner76's Avatar
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    Dec 2009
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    Beaufort, NC
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    I use a Wallyworld pad becuse it works, it cheap and I don't have the $$ to buy a UQ rght now.
    I am 18 with 48 years of experience ! ................ Hike the Neusiok Trail & check out the NTforum !

  9. #9
    Senior Member Rob3E's Avatar
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    All of my overnights have been relatively warm: lows in the 60's, I think. I've been carrying the pad with me, but on the first night it gets kicked out of the hammock. I sleep with a summer weight sleeping bag, and that's been enough for me so far, but I still carry the pad because I'd like something on hand if it gets cooler. I've been thinking about just getting a space blanket/tarp from REI and using that as a light weight underquilt, or even using it to hold the pad because wrestling with the pad in the hammock is a pain. Some folks put it in their sleeping bag, which might work as well if you didn't have a mummy bag.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Fiddleback's Avatar
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    Almost all of us agree that underinsulation is necessary...somewhere between 60 and 70 it's too cold to do without. What that underinsulation is depends on the individual sleep system, the conditions to be faced on the trail, the hanger him/herself and personal preference.

    I always suggest newbies start off simple and cheap, e.g., a pad from Oware or Gossamer which can be had for the mid-$20's and weighs 6oz. Such a pad works for me into the mid-20's but that's me and my system.

    FB

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