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  1. #1
    Senior Member USMCStang's Avatar
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    Do I really sleep too hot?

    So, I just took my first Hammock Trip, to the Smokies, and I made a few observations for myself that seem to conflict with the general consensus around here. Am I just odd? Here's the facts:

    Hammock: WBBB 1.0 DL
    Tarp: WBBMJ
    Sleeping Bag: Marmot Wind River 40 degree down, hoodless mummy.
    Pad: Alps Mountaineering 0.6 inch CCF ($12 @ REI...great pad, by the way)
    Nightime lows: Around 45 degrees

    So, I get out there, set everything up, and sleep reasonably well just using the sleeping bag as a top quilt. I only woke up when I found myself drenched in sweat. I did this two nights in a row. My final night, I decided to leave the pad nearby my hammock on the ground in case I needed it, and just crawl inside the sleeping bag. I slept like a dream. No sweat, no waking up with chills. The smokies are always humid, so everything was clammy in the morning, but not soaked like the first two nights.

    It seems that the general consensus around here is that you need some sort of insulation underneath when using a sleeping bag in temps below 60, but my own observations seem to contradict this. I'm just looking to find out if anyone else sleeps this hot, or if there is some other factor (whether its the double layer, the design of the Blackbird, or if the pad I'm using is too thick) affecting my results.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by USMCStang View Post
    So, I just took my first Hammock Trip, to the Smokies, and I made a few observations for myself that seem to conflict with the general consensus around here. Am I just odd? Here's the facts:

    Hammock: WBBB 1.0 DL
    Tarp: WBBMJ
    Sleeping Bag: Marmot Wind River 40 degree down, hoodless mummy.
    Pad: Alps Mountaineering 0.6 inch CCF ($12 @ REI...great pad, by the way)
    Nightime lows: Around 45 degrees

    So, I get out there, set everything up, and sleep reasonably well just using the sleeping bag as a top quilt. I only woke up when I found myself drenched in sweat. I did this two nights in a row. My final night, I decided to leave the pad nearby my hammock on the ground in case I needed it, and just crawl inside the sleeping bag. I slept like a dream. No sweat, no waking up with chills. The smokies are always humid, so everything was clammy in the morning, but not soaked like the first two nights.

    It seems that the general consensus around here is that you need some sort of insulation underneath when using a sleeping bag in temps below 60, but my own observations seem to contradict this. I'm just looking to find out if anyone else sleeps this hot, or if there is some other factor (whether its the double layer, the design of the Blackbird, or if the pad I'm using is too thick) affecting my results.
    The fact that you woke up wet when using a pad is not that surprising to me. The thing that surprises me is you didn't wake up cold without a pad.
    "The only rule to survivialin is NEVER GIVE UP"
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  3. #3
    Knotty's Avatar
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    How unusual. Most people need bottom insulation below 75F.

    Did you feel hot with the pad or just get a lot of condensation?
    Knotty
    "Don't speak unless it improves the silence." -proverb
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  4. #4
    Senior Member backpackingZombie's Avatar
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    Thanks for the question. I'm a furnace myself and I'm always interested to hear from other furnaces.

    Most camping nights I end up throwing the bag to the side or using it as a blanket
    When it seems like the night will last forever
    And there's nothing left to do but count the years
    When the strings of my heart start to sever
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    And dream me a dream of my own
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  5. #5
    Senior Member stefprez's Avatar
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    I tend to be a warmer sleeper, and I can't sleep if I'm too hot. Just can't. I'd much rather be cold. For me, I've slept in shorts, no shirt, nothing above me, and nothing below me in an overnight low of around 74. One of the following nights, when I laid down it was still around 80, so I had the same approach, but it cooled down into the next morning, and I woke up chilly, so I tossed my bag over me like a blanket, still nothing below me. I think that was around mid 60's. Everyone will get different mileage in terms of sleeping hot or cold.

    I've slept down to freezing with a bag rated at 37 for the EN limit rating (coldest temp an average male can sleep for six hours in a curled position without being woken from cold), and nothing under me. Granted I was layered up decently in fleece pants, a fleece jacket, and hat. I was still usually on the chillier sides of things, but granted, I slept.

    I'd say keep planning on needing the "usual" amount of insulation for your next couple trips until you can really verify how warm or cold you sleep. Every aspect of the sleep system makes a difference, even if it's using the same sleeping bag as a bag or a quilt. Mess around with the variables and take note of when you are hot, when you are cold, and when everything is perfect. Once you've got it figured out, trust your experiences and bring only what you think you'll need. (Also, it's probably better to be a warmer sleeper than vice versa. Consider yourself lucky! ) Happy hanging.

  6. #6
    Senior Member grich9860's Avatar
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    i too am a hot sleeper and was wondering if i would have any issues with sleeping to hot on my first upcoming hammock hiking trip. (not my first hike) i have taken several naps in my hammock in the basement and did find that i was hot while in my sleeping bag. i did not plan to take my sleeping pad with me but i might take it just to be safe.
    Hops

  7. #7
    flatline's Avatar
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    i tend to perspire when i use a pad. i think it is more because of the vapor barrier effect than the amount of insulation it provides. rather like cloth seats vs leather or vinyl seats.
    a sleeping bag still provides bottom insulation, just not as much as the top (lofted) side.

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  8. #8
    Senior Member USMCStang's Avatar
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    I was definitely too warm with the pad on the bottom and the sleeping bag used as a quilt. The pad I have is much more flexible than the blue CCF pads from wal mart, so the hammock actually curls it around my body at the shoulder and legs (I haven't cut it yet, but I don't see a need to with it's flexibility). I have a BA Air Core (non-insulated) that I may try as well.

    I'm thinking of making a light fleece UQ, basically a pad sleeve, and playing around with different synthetic insulations for filling in the back yard before closing the end off. That may be the route to go for me. I can always supplement with the pad if temperatures really drop, but I've got months before that happens. I hate carrying the pad, simply because of it's bulk. Weight isn't as big a concern to me.

    It looks like I have some options to play with.

  9. #9
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadtorque View Post
    The fact that you woke up wet when using a pad is not that surprising to me. The thing that surprises me is you didn't wake up cold without a pad.
    Quote Originally Posted by Knotty View Post
    How unusual. Most people need bottom insulation below 75F.

    Did you feel hot with the pad or just get a lot of condensation?
    I guess it just goes to show again how much people can vary. I was going to say that when you got in your sleeping bag you gained some insulation underneath, though to gain enough for mid 40s from a 40F bag would still be very surprising. But then I saw your bag was down. I am convinced that I still get some amount of noticeable back warmth form the bottom layer of a synthetic sleeping bag. Maybe 5 or 10 degrees or maybe even a little more? But down that you lay on pretty much compresses 100%, so shouldn't be much bottom warmth with that bag, I wouldn't think.

    But OK at ~45 with nothing under you seems to be way outside the norm for sure. Some are cold at 1* below 75, some at 70. Maybe a few are OK at 65. But 45? It seems way more common when some one tries to sleep at even 55 or 60 with nothing for under insulation, they report a miserable night. Especially if they are not inside a synthetic sleeping bag and/or sleeping in heavy layers of synthetic poorly compressing clothing.

    Ditto on the question re: were you too hot with the pad or just condensing on it. Just like some of us stay dry in a HHSS with space blanket, others wake up swimming. It is not usually because they are overheating in the HHSS- at least I don't think they are but who knows- it seems it is just condensation. EDIT: have you slept on that pad on the ground at similar temps? If so, did you wake up soaked? If not, then I wouldn't think the pad is too hot for you in these conditions, but rather think you are dealing with condensation. Some think pad condensation is worse in a hammock because the pad somewhat wraps around you, decreasing opportunities for ventilation, maybe.

    Edit 2: I just saw your post saying you are sure you were too warm.

    But maybe you are just really lucky. If you can sleep in the 40s comfortably with no under insulation, then good for you! You don't have to fool with any of the expense, bulk or weight! But if so, I don't think many are going to be in your category. I think the vast majority are going to need a little something below 70.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 05-15-2011 at 15:58.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  10. #10
    Senior Member Danalex's Avatar
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    I've been trying things in the basement for a while now and when it was cooler down there I could almost sleep on a pad. Now it's warmer and I sweat like crazy. Go with a summer UQ and you'll be happy.
    "Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube. That is why God made fast motorcycles"
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