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  1. #11
    I have never slept in just a liner as its never that warm here, but as part of a sleep system, in my opinion its a total waste. 5 extra oz for 5 degrees of warmth is not worth it. I carry silk weight thermals if I need extra insulation and that gives me lots of flexibility. it keeps my quilt clean, I use them when I stop in camp to stay warm, and I also use them in extreme cases while hiking if a freak snow storm shows up in july.

  2. #12
    Senior Member pizza's Avatar
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    Yeah, I got mine before I started hammocking. The liners are definitely more suited to ground use because they are a PITA to get in and out of in the hammock. As far as durability goes I am surprised how well mine has held up over the past few tears. I haven't used it a lot but it's been washed a couple times and still looks in good shape.

  3. #13
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vesteroid View Post
    I have never slept in just a liner as its never that warm here, but as part of a sleep system, in my opinion its a total waste. 5 extra oz for 5 degrees of warmth is not worth it. I carry silk weight thermals if I need extra insulation and that gives me lots of flexibility. it keeps my quilt clean, I use them when I stop in camp to stay warm, and I also use them in extreme cases while hiking if a freak snow storm shows up in july.
    Agree that the silk-weight or real silk pjs are the better solution. They work for me in a cold regular bed. (I'd welcome a thermal regulation maven to explain just why!!) Even in a normal bed, I've found silk liners to be too small; likely my fault in selection, thinking I was gonna enjoy the luxury of a set of silk or satin sheets and pillow case, all for $30.

    Not mentioned in this thread, or in most, is that traction is a big issue in maybe all but bridge hammocks. Getting several layers right in a hammock might be like backing a up a double-bottom trailer on an iced-over parking lot with a a 3 degree grade.

  4. #14
    Senior Member scooterdogma's Avatar
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    I have a COCOON silk liner which I use in my hammock in the summer. It was too hard to use it as a mummy bag, so, I opened up one seam and made it into a silk quilt. Perfect for those muggy southern nights.

  5. #15
    Member phatpacker's Avatar
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    Silk

    Be sure also to consider the moisture wicking qualities to regulate your temperature.

  6. #16
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
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    I found that trying to get inside a silk sleeping bag liner while in my hammock to be just about impossible for me. I did like having something very lite weight on top of me during the summer. My solution was to give my silk liner to my husband, let him deal with trying to get inside of it. And I bought some silk yardage and sewed the edges and made myself a silk top sheet. I carry this on just about all of my backpacking and car type camping trips. During the summer time when temps here are "freaking H-O-T" and the humidity is off the scales, I've found that I still like to have something over me and the silk sheet is perfect. During the winter, I'll use that silk sheet inside my hammock to keep any condensation off of me and my down quilts. I'll hang the silk sheet over the ridgeline and drape it around my head. Condensation tends to collect in the sheet and my face and head stay warm too. The silk is quick to dry too. My personal uses of this piece of gear has been positive. My silk sheet is always taken with me. Also mine is really a sheet, it's flat w/no seams sewing the edges together like the sleeping bag liner.

    TinaLouise

  7. #17
    Member Barefeetz's Avatar
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    I have the Sea to Summit liner and have used it alone down to ~68F. Silk will add 6-10F of warmth when used as an inner layer (can't remember exactly where I read that), but is much like the ripstop on it's on.

    It will aid in moisture control, some wind blocking, and add to your comfort level. If you're prone to cold butt syndrome though, I doubt it will relieve the symptoms.

    The silk liner can be challenging. It's not exactly roomy and, as others have stated, hard to get into once horizontal. The trick that works for me is to have a small, clean groundcloth, step into the liner, pull it up around my shoulders, then get into hammock. Works every time. Just be sure to leave a little slack at your feet (e.g. don't pull it up tight), or your legs will get twisted up pretty quickly.
    Ignorance is temporary. Stupid is forever...

    I'm not high maintenance! I'm simply low tolerance.

  8. #18
    kayak karl's Avatar
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    i cut a head hole and two arm holes in mine and wore it like a nite shirt.

    picture me walking Kaia in that get up Hawk-eye LOL.
    "Tenting is equivalent to a bum crawling into a cardboard box, hammocking is an art" KK

  9. #19
    Senior Member turnerminator's Avatar
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    I went on a hammock trip in winter a couple of years ago and found I'd forgotten my sleeping bag. I did have 3 sea-to summit silk liners at my disposal though, so I used the 3 together and woke up the next morning warm.

    It was -5C, so they must provide some insulation. I know I would have been very cold without them .

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