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  1. #1
    New Member mcvincnt's Avatar
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    Are you looking for a sewing machine?

    I had to go pick up a new blade for our serger today and while at the sewing machine store looked at their used machines. It got me thinking about several posts I have read on people just getting into DIY projects and looking for their first machine. There is always the debate about garage sale machines, new wally world/Joann's cheap machines, and someone always mentions a sewing shop used machines. I highly recommend anyone wanting a new/different/first machine, and doesn't want to spend a lot of money, to go to their local sewing machine store. For example, below are pics of the machines our local store had below $100 today. Some are under $50.

  2. #2
    Senior Member hippofeet's Avatar
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    I thought I was gonna get a sewing machine... lol.
    An emergency of my own making...is still an emergency.

  3. #3
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    I totally lucked out with a good shape Bernina 807 from someone in my wife's family. (It just appeared one day)

    Now I just have to learn how to use it!

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    YES!!! Go check them out for sure! I got a really good used Bernina awhile back from a repair shop, and it was a real bargain. It came with 6 or so lessons to use it (much needed in my case. I'd been sewing almost daily for 40 years on my first love, a really old cast iron long-bobbin, straight-sew only, no-reverse Singer from the Dark Ages, with a few clunky "patent-pending" attachments). The used Bernina I got came with a year warranty and was fully serviced before I brought it home. Came with a number of attachments that they taught me how to use. What a deal! I agree, go check out your local thread injector repair stores -- only remember that they call 'em by that quaint term "sewing machine" in those places!

  5. #5
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    wholly, was any money exchanged for this ?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    The wife sewed professionally freelance on torpedo bobbin case Domestic treadle for a while. Absolutely bomb proof. But good luck finding a replacement case that is not worn as bad or worse than one that exists now after 100 years.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_gr8t_waldo View Post
    wholly, was any money exchanged for this ?
    I think I paid about $100 for the Bernina. That was for the whole enchilada including the lessons and attachments and a folding table for it, but that was back in the mid-80's if I remember right. I still use it and like it a lot, though it has several bells & whistles I never use (all those decorative stitches built in). It was more than worth the cost, even then. Now it costs more to keep it maintained than I paid for it in the first place! I still have my ancient long-bobbin Singer, too, that I use for really heavy duty stuff -- that thing can sew boot leather! Only goes straight and no reverse -- but who needs zigzag! I got the Singer when I was about 15 and have dragged it around the country ever since. No way I'll ever find parts now for either machine if it has a problem, so I just do my best to keep it clean and very lightly oiled. Next time I need a machine, I'll probably look for one the same way, also thrift stores. I saw a couple of maybe-good oldies just the other day in a thrift store, but I'm still unpacking after a big move and no place or time right now for another toy. I wouldn't buy a new one, ever! Too much plastic for me., and not a chance anyway on my miniscule income!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhollyHamaca View Post
    Only goes straight and no reverse -- but who needs zigzag!
    I'm sure you know the work around for no reverse. But for others who may be wondering... start at the edge of the fabric and stitch about 1/2". Stop and lift the presser foot making sure the needle is raised. Pull the fabric back toward you and sew over what you just put down. Don't cut or break the thread. Just pull it back and restitch. End the stitch line essentially the same way. Sounds complicated but once you get the hang of it you can do it almost as fast as pushing a reverse lever/button. In reality.. Who needs reverse?!?
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  9. #9
    New Member mcvincnt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    The wife sewed professionally freelance on torpedo bobbin case Domestic treadle for a while. Absolutely bomb proof. But good luck finding a replacement case that is not worn as bad or worse than one that exists now after 100 years.
    My wife found me a Domestic Rotary model 153 (same as White model 77) for $36 at a flea market. I blew the dust out, oiled it up liberally, and it is running like a champ. It's in a cabinet too, not a portable. You couldn't even buy the bobbins on eBay for what she paid for the whole setup (machine, around 10-15 feet, 8 bobbins, and the manual). That said if you don't want to take a chance at garage sales or flea markets go to a local sewing shop. You are going to find better deals than a $99 new Singer.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    I'm sure you know the work around for no reverse. But for others who may be wondering... start at the edge of the fabric and stitch about 1/2". Stop and lift the presser foot making sure the needle is raised. Pull the fabric back toward you and sew over what you just put down. Don't cut or break the thread. Just pull it back and restitch. End the stitch line essentially the same way. Sounds complicated but once you get the hang of it you can do it almost as fast as pushing a reverse lever/button. In reality.. Who needs reverse?!?
    Right -- who needs reverse! I do it just a little differently, non-stop "on the fly" without lifting the presser foot: I start about 1/2" in from the end (so any ravels or thread ends don't get balled up and pucker the end) and hold onto that back edge and the loose thread ends while I sew the first few stitches. Then, with the machine still running, I just pull the fabric toward me a little so it sews back over those few stitches, then I release it so it keeps going forward as usual. Same thing at the end of the seam. I've never yet broken or bent a needle doing this, but I usually run the machine pretty fast except when sewing through thick cross-seams,and I don't pull hard. Quick and easy way to "lock" the seam ends on my old-faithful thread injector. No guarantees, but it works great for me!

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