Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    Edge/superfly
    Insulation
    Adict
    Posts
    664

    Gros Morne Newfoundland - North Rim and Long Range

    I recently returned from a backpacking trip to Newfoundland's Gros Morne National Park. The park is a part of the International Appalachian Trail and is on the Western side of Newfoundland. The terrain is low mountain and is arctic tundra so a lot different from much of the places I've camped.

    There are two back-country routes there (trails is the wrong word). The North Rim is a linear 27 km and the Long Range linearly 35 km. Despite the seemingly short distance, this was a 6 night solo trip and I don't know if would be possible in much less. The reason for the hardship is that there is no actual trail and the park has this wonderful tree called tuckamore that is stunted balsam and spruce trees that grow in this arctic tundra and are essentially impenetrable.

    Having no trails for most of the route, the wardens require you to take an orienteering test before issuing permits and make you take along a transmitter. They also have you trace out a recommended route. Most people follow the Long Range Traverse which has campsites at 5 places and few follow the North Rim which has thick tuck and path-finding is challenging.


    My first night was after a short trek to snug harbour, a nice little site sheltered in what is essentially a fjord. After that was the climb to the Long Range Plateau, about 700m above the first site. After around 9 hours I made it to the next site. The next day was another 9 hours of treking up and down and through tuck and bogs. It's amazing to think that walking through knee deep bogs, climbing 100 m up a ridge, or detouring a couple kms was preferable to the tuck.

    (Thankfully) the fourth day was rainy and fog dense enough to prevent navigating so I had a day to rest and take in some calories. After that, the way was a little easier when I got onto the Long Range, except for numerous waist deep river crossings and the decent back down which finds it's way down the side of a cliff, dropping at a 45 degree grade (in the rain).

    Biggest surprise was that I had decent weather for 4 of the 7 days (the others were rain and thick Newfoundland fog). Some amazing scenery including snow patches, caribou, moose, ptarmigan (and some pretty big black bear prints).

    An extremely challenging trek (especially carrying 8 days of food) but well worth it.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by keg; 07-21-2011 at 13:45.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ganon414's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Hammock
    DIY Warbird
    Tarp
    Guide Gear 12'x12'
    Insulation
    15* down bag & pad
    Suspension
    whoopies
    Posts
    127
    Awesome report keg! Sounds like quite the challenge. That is some pretty spectacular scenery. Thanks for sharing.

    --Tim

  3. #3
    Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 SL
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    WB and UGQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies or Straps
    Posts
    6,403
    Images
    80
    Great pics and report! Looks awesome. Too bad you couldn't meet up with BLUEFIN 774.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  4. #4
    mbiraman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Kootenays,BC,Canada
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BB DL 1.1 & Lite Owl
    Tarp
    Black MacCat Del.
    Insulation
    Yeti 3,4 & HRQ/HGB
    Suspension
    webbing/whoopie
    Posts
    4,594
    Images
    7
    Great pics. Beautiful place.
    " The mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

    “The measure of your life will not be in what you accumulate, but in what you give away.” ~Wayne Dyer

    www.birchsidecustomwoodwork.com

  5. #5
    Rockdawg69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Central TN, Southeast GA
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.1 dbl & TTTR Switchback
    Tarp
    OES SpinnUL 11x10
    Insulation
    Nest, Hudson River
    Suspension
    Whoopies/Stingerz
    Posts
    1,143
    Rugged landscape and beautiful. I can see why it took 6 days of finding your way. Really a cross-country trek. Thanks for the pics and report.
    Rockdawg69

    Professional Prevaricator: Part-time dealer in Yarns, Tales, Half-Truths, & Outright Lies -1st half-hour session at no cost (Lawyers and Doctors excepted).

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    Edge/superfly
    Insulation
    Adict
    Posts
    664
    I forgot to mention the bugs. Blackflies out in force, mosquitoes, and some other kind of camouflage housefly thing that all together made me feel like the kid in the UNICEF commercials every time I stopped.

  7. #7
    Senior Member MedicineMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Roan Mountain,TN
    Hammock
    Traveler with HNO AirShip
    Tarp
    HNO AirShip
    Insulation
    Leiglo 5/50
    Suspension
    Everything Dutch
    Posts
    5,659
    Images
    76
    SPECTACULAR!!!! I need this park badly.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Toronto now, Elliot Lake in my heart!
    Hammock
    None yet, but hopefully soon!
    Posts
    48
    ****, that's some stunning scenery! I really want to do this trip, maybe in the next summer or so. After I take an orienteering refresher, that is! Don't want your compass skills to be only so-so out there.
    Great report, Keg, I might bother you for more details later.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    Edge/superfly
    Insulation
    Adict
    Posts
    664
    GPS helps. Also the open views make it a lot easier to pick out landmarks..

  10. #10
    BLUEFIN 774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Newfoundland, Canada
    Hammock
    Hennessy ULBA with 2QZQ mod #4
    Tarp
    AHE Toxaway Tarp
    Insulation
    Hammockgear TQ/UQ
    Suspension
    WhoOpie Slings/DCs
    Posts
    871
    Quote Originally Posted by keg View Post
    I recently returned from a backpacking trip to Newfoundland's Gros Morne National Park. The park is a part of the International Appalachian Trail and is on the Western side of Newfoundland. The terrain is low mountain and is arctic tundra so a lot different from much of the places I've camped.

    There are two back-country routes there (trails is the wrong word). The North Rim is a linear 27 km and the Long Range linearly 35 km. Despite the seemingly short distance, this was a 6 night solo trip and I don't know if would be possible in much less. The reason for the hardship is that there is no actual trail and the park has this wonderful tree called tuckamore that is stunted balsam and spruce trees that grow in this arctic tundra and are essentially impenetrable.

    Having no trails for most of the route, the wardens require you to take an orienteering test before issuing permits and make you take along a transmitter. They also have you trace out a recommended route. Most people follow the Long Range Traverse which has campsites at 5 places and few follow the North Rim which has thick tuck and path-finding is challenging.


    My first night was after a short trek to snug harbour, a nice little site sheltered in what is essentially a fjord. After that was the climb to the Long Range Plateau, about 700m above the first site. After around 9 hours I made it to the next site. The next day was another 9 hours of treking up and down and through tuck and bogs. It's amazing to think that walking through knee deep bogs, climbing 100 m up a ridge, or detouring a couple kms was preferable to the tuck.

    (Thankfully) the fourth day was rainy and fog dense enough to prevent navigating so I had a day to rest and take in some calories. After that, the way was a little easier when I got onto the Long Range, except for numerous waist deep river crossings and the decent back down which finds it's way down the side of a cliff, dropping at a 45 degree grade (in the rain).

    Biggest surprise was that I had decent weather for 4 of the 7 days (the others were rain and thick Newfoundland fog). Some amazing scenery including snow patches, caribou, moose, ptarmigan (and some pretty big black bear prints).

    An extremely challenging trek (especially carrying 8 days of food) but well worth it.
    Hey keg,

    I'm just finding this post now.
    I was away at work when this was originally posted I guess. Beautiful photos there in Gros Morne. I have not hiked the North Rim or the Long Range Traverse yet. I have hiked most of the other trails in the park. All Beautiful hikes. Thanks for sharing your photos to HF showing the beautiful scenery here in Newfoundland, Canada.
    Take care,
    Bluefin


    Bluefin's Videos

Similar Threads

  1. Gros grain ribbon on sale 9/29-10/5
    By sandykayak in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-30-2013, 10:34
  2. Hello from Newfoundland, Canada
    By tysonb in forum Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-25-2013, 14:34
  3. FS: North Face Cat's Meow 20F Men's Long Sleeping Bag
    By peripatew in forum [SOLD/WITHDRAWN] Items no longer available
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-29-2012, 00:44
  4. Grand Tetons National Park - Gros Ventre Campground
    By Montalaskan in forum Trip Reports
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-13-2012, 04:15
  5. FS: North Face Cat's Meow Long Left
    By inspectorguy in forum [SOLD/WITHDRAWN] Items no longer available
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-31-2012, 08:22

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •