Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    15

    What's the advantage of a Peapod?

    Wouldn't it make more sense to use a regular top quilt? seems to me like you'd have more ease of temp control with the top insulation right there on your body since you can roll it back a bit if you get too hot or cover up when you get cold.

    Talk to me peapod users. I'm trying to learn all I can before I go and start making plans to buy things.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Raul Perez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Hammock
    1.1 Blackbird or Traveler SL
    Tarp
    OES Deluxe Cuben
    Insulation
    Yeti - all seasons
    Suspension
    Dynaglide Whoopies
    Posts
    2,363
    Images
    49
    The peapod system is used for deep winter excursions by many of our die hard winter hikers here. Based on a lot of tests last winter it seems to be the best way to stay toasty warm in temps below 0*F

    Shug and some others have tested this down in the -20*F ranges and had good results.

    It is bulky and heavy system. I believe Shug places the gear in his sled when he uses it.
    "If you give a monkey a gun and he shoots someone, you dont blame the monkey"

    The end of the world is not coming in December, it is happening now in my living room. - TFC Rick

    http://watermonkey.net/

    Youtube Channel:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/RaulPerez1?feature=mhee

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Auburn, MA
    Hammock
    JRB BMB
    Tarp
    JRB 11'x10'
    Insulation
    JRB TQ / UQ set
    Suspension
    JRB tri-glide
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by Raul Perez View Post
    The peapod system is used for deep winter excursions by many of our die hard winter hikers here. Based on a lot of tests last winter it seems to be the best way to stay toasty warm in temps below 0*F

    Shug and some others have tested this down in the -20*F ranges and had good results.

    It is bulky and heavy system. I believe Shug places the gear in his sled when he uses it.
    + 1

    exactly my view of the peapod as well

    this insulation system is reported [by peeps who go out and try lots of different systems] to have advantages for sub-zero temperatures

    not really a lightweight approach for 3 season backpacking
    Love my JRB BMB

  4. #4
    Darby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Elizabeth City, North Carolina
    Hammock
    Switchback 1.9DL
    Tarp
    10x12 TTTG CatCut
    Insulation
    PolarPod
    Suspension
    TTTG Ring Buckle
    Posts
    668
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Raul Perez View Post
    The peapod system is used for deep winter excursions by many of our die hard winter hikers here. Based on a lot of tests last winter it seems to be the best way to stay toasty warm in temps below 0*F

    Shug and some others have tested this down in the -20*F ranges and had good results.

    It is bulky and heavy system. I believe Shug places the gear in his sled when he uses it.
    Winter camping/hiking is going to be heavier, period. We hit temps of -30+ on Roan High Knob in Feb. this year and I was almost too warm at times.
    PolarPod.JPG
    A pulk will make it easier to handle heavier loads. The cooler was overkill but I never had to thaw my water.

    Cheers, Dale
    Beer won't solve problems, but then again, neither will milk !
    Designer of the Switchback Hammock
    Tree to Tree Trail Gear:http://tttrailgear.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member finskie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    harrisburg, pa
    Hammock
    GT UL Mod
    Tarp
    ZPacks and WB Edge
    Insulation
    Leighlo
    Suspension
    webbing, triglide
    Posts
    348
    Images
    2
    now is the peapod good down to and below 0* or would you need the polar pod? What is the difference?
    What saves a man is to take a step. Then another step. - C.S. Lewis

  6. #6
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,999
    Images
    364
    Quote Originally Posted by Raul Perez View Post
    The peapod system is used for deep winter excursions by many of our die hard winter hikers here. Based on a lot of tests last winter it seems to be the best way to stay toasty warm in temps below 0*F

    Shug and some others have tested this down in the -20*F ranges and had good results.

    It is bulky and heavy system. I believe Shug places the gear in his sled when he uses it.
    Quote Originally Posted by tjm View Post
    + 1

    exactly my view of the peapod as well

    this insulation system is reported [by peeps who go out and try lots of different systems] to have advantages for sub-zero temperatures

    not really a lightweight approach for 3 season backpacking
    +2 it is a winter mainstay. Not the only way to stay warm, but one of the most guaranteed ways to keep you warm. You ask " What's the advantage of a Peapod? ".

    Answer #1: Bomb proof draft control. First and foremost, that is the major selling point, IMO. Many a quilt user, or someone trying to use a mummy bag as a quilt, have reported challenges keeping things tucked through the night as they toss and turn. The bigger the user/the smaller the quilt, the bigger the challenge. Not saying it can't be done- in fact I have done it- but sometimes it is a challenge. At the same time, similar problems have been reported some UQ users. All this varies with the quilt, the users experience and various little tricks to overcome these issues. Again, it can definitely be done, and I have done it, but issues have been reported.

    But the PeaPod/PolarPod can quickly defeat all of these issues. It is "sealed" on the ends AND drapes over the sides of the hammock down on to you, or close. So cold air has a hard time coming in either end or side and getting into any gap that might be under you.

    But you might have a new draft problem caused by the hammock lifting the TQ part of the pod and giving a lot of space to be heated, and allowing the air you do warm up to escape out of any breathing hole. But this problem is very easily solved. First, you can close the pod all the way, with amazingly little condensation problems- or close it down to a very tiny vent hole. Instead of wearing your puffy jacket and vest, you can just lay them on top of you or put them on backwards to fill any gap and form a neck collar to "seal" off escape of warm air out of the breathing hole. And some of the more narrow hammocks, like the Claytor, pretty much allow the pod to drape down on your body any way. And finally, just adding a light summer TQ or bag will fill most any gap with even a wider hammock. Now you have the loft of the pod added to the loft of the TQ, NO drafts at all no matter how you move, a pretty good built in thick hood, and you are roasting. Still not a problem, because venting this set up- with full length Velcro, varies from zero to wide open. So, that is the advantage!

    Quote Originally Posted by Darby View Post
    Winter camping/hiking is going to be heavier, period. We hit temps of -30+ on Roan High Knob in Feb. this year and I was almost too warm at times.
    PolarPod.JPG
    A pulk will make it easier to handle heavier loads. The cooler was overkill but I never had to thaw my water.

    Cheers, Dale
    Now, when considering the weight issue mentioned several times: My 20F pod weighs 42 oz, and some models are 38 oz. ( applies to when Speer was making them, not sure about now with TTTG- might be heavier or lighter) . So what is the weight of two full length and LONG 20F quilts? 21 oz? 23 oz? So what is that times two( a TQ + 1 UQ)? 42-46 oz? What about after you add a hood with 2.5" of single layer loft? So I'm not so sure a pod approach is really much heavier. Admittedly, that UQ/TQ combo ( plus a good hood) will be warmer on top because of no gap. But again, a narrow hammock takes care of most of that, putting your puffy jackets on top of you also greatly helps that gap, and adding a summer TQ wipes out any gap problem and gives you much more loft than you had with the 20F TQ, so now it is a much warmer TQ than 20F, though heavier. Plus, far fewer potential draft problems and great head warmth built in.

    Using the clothes I had with me any way, and a narrow Claytor No Net hammock, I have used my 42 oz PeaPod and been just OK at 27, and toasty in the 30s. Could I have done much better with 42 oz worth of TQ/UQs plus several oz worth of hoods. Or as good with a full length tq/uq/hood combo that weighed much less?

    Quote Originally Posted by finskie View Post
    now is the peapod good down to and below 0* or would you need the polar pod? What is the difference?
    PeaPods are easily good to 20 ( for me) on the bottom, and potentially good to 20 on top, depending on many variables like hammock width and how much top gap you end up with, and what you have with you to fill the gap. If you start adding even light TQs, it can easily be way warmer than 20 on top.

    PolarPod is the same temp rating, but much bigger allowing good downward drape with larger hammocks and with more room allowing adding additional bags/quilts/jackets/pads/dry leaves as needed without running out of room so quickly and compressing loft. There is no telling how low you could go by adding stuff to this setup.

    One reason not to use a PeaPod would be for roominess. For me the sensation of a big TQ/hood or winter sleeping bag inside a JRB BMBH with a MW4 UQ is a more open, roomy sensation. And if you can control the drafts it will work just as well. But a pod is snug as a bug in a rug!
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 08-17-2011 at 22:14.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  7. #7
    Crawldaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Asheville, NC area
    Hammock
    Dream Hammock
    Tarp
    Cuban Hex tarp
    Insulation
    goose down
    Suspension
    Whoopie
    Posts
    397
    Images
    8
    Only thing I can add is I had Speer make my PP a tube wider so I essentially use it as a hanging bivy. With a ridgeline on the inside of the Pod, I have room to move, read, etc. I really like that advantage. And actually, since Im a cold sleeper, I transfer to my PP from my summer setup when the weather gets below 40*. Perfect for me..

  8. #8
    Senior Member gargoyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Middlebury, IN
    Hammock
    G-Bird II
    Tarp
    Ogee tarp
    Insulation
    AHE TQ DIY Down UQ
    Suspension
    whoop dutch!
    Posts
    6,256
    Images
    46
    Good tip on the cooler Dale, thanks.
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  9. #9
    Senior Member NFA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Lake Clear, NY
    Hammock
    HH & WB & GT & ENO
    Tarp
    Hennessy ASYM 30D
    Insulation
    CCF
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    302
    Images
    31
    I considered a peapod, and went with a hammock sock instead for a couple of reasons: lighter weight and smaller and more space inside...my sock has a couple of layers of Insultex in the bottom, and that, in combination with the micro-climate created inside the sock, makes for very comfortable sleeping, even in quite cold weather.

    Jamie - nfa
    "We must hang together, gentlemen...else, we shall most assuredly hang separately." - Benjamin Franklin


    My Author Website/Blog - My first novel, "Here Be Monsters", a mystery set in the Adirondacks, has just been published in paperback and Kindle formats.

  10. #10
    Senior Member fourdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    St Francis, MN
    Hammock
    Exped combo, exped basic
    Tarp
    DYI, six sided
    Insulation
    foam refletex,
    Suspension
    whoopie sling
    Posts
    491
    Images
    1
    I'm with Billy Bob. Why do I want two sleeping systems ? Under qulit , over quilt . When I can use one item that does both ! It can also be used as a sleeping bag or quilt and as with the "Dreamwalker" a parka.

    I can move around, shift nothen to move or leave gaps.

    Easy in easy out. No adjusting or fiddle factor.

    My go to system all four season .
    I just can't understand why more people don't use it.

    fourdog

    www.fourdog.com

Similar Threads

  1. Another advantage of the Ridgerunner.
    By Miguel in forum Warbonnet Hammocks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-09-2013, 20:48
  2. So what's the advantage?
    By Just swingin in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-10-2013, 10:31
  3. advantage of a yeti
    By kayaknut01 in forum Warbonnet Hammocks
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 05-12-2009, 09:51
  4. Advantage with Weight or No...
    By RTR in forum Clark Jungle Hammocks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-26-2008, 19:37
  5. Advantage of a HAAB?
    By froldt in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-27-2008, 09:21

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •