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  1. #1
    New Member adfischer's Avatar
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    UQ for wide temp ranges?

    I do a lot of camping with Boy Scouts. So far I have used my HH down to the 50s with a sleeping pad but its time to upgrade to a UQ.

    I live in the SE and experience a wide range of temps in fall and winter, anywhere from 70s down to 20s (maybe even teens possible).

    I am looking at the JRB winter nest since I sleep cold (rated down to 0). My question is can I use something like this when its warmer - say 40s, 50s, or 60s or will I burn up? Since heat rises I am hoping that is the case. I really dont want to have to purchase multiple quilts for different temp ratings if I can avoid it.

  2. #2
    Senior Member te-wa's Avatar
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    i will admit, you'd be hard pressed to use just One quilt from 70 down to 0.
    you are on the right track in your thinking, i have had no issue using my 20 degree (freeze) in temps around 60 (for a low). UQ's seem to be superior to pads in many ways, but for one that they "reflect" heat back to you.
    i recommend to my clients that they use the Flurry (0 degree+) quilt only up to about 40, because it just gets too hot above temps like that.
    if you want a fairly versatile system, a quilt like the regular nest and a pad when needed might be better than a full fledged winter model to use all year.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    +1 on Te-Wa's comments. Get a 20* UQ unless you camp a lot in temps below freezing. Adding a pad to a 3season UQ is a good option since you have a back up if you have to go to ground. I like a UQ pad combo for low temps. In temps above 60 you can turn your UQ upside down and compress the down to eliminate loft (warmth). This works great for temps in the 60's up.

  4. #4
    New Member adfischer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by te-wa View Post
    if you want a fairly versatile system, a quilt like the regular nest and a pad when needed might be better than a full fledged winter model to use all year.
    Since I already have to add weight when winter camping, using a pad too just makes it worse. I wonder if a better strategy would be to get a winter nest for 50 and below and keep using the pad for above 50?

    Downside is no go to ground option, but upside is I would only have to carry one or the other - not both.

    Decisions, decisions

  5. #5
    lilricky's Avatar
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    When temperatures warm up, I simply loosen up the ends of my winter UQ, allowing the air in between to circulate. It's a bit of a hassle to find the right amount of gap for the right temperature, but its usually less than 5 minutes to get it right.

  6. #6
    Knotty's Avatar
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    I'm of the philosophy that UQs are limited only by their low temp rating. When it gets too warm in my Winter Nest I simply vent it. Not much you can do if it gets too cold and all you have is a three season UQ.
    Knotty
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  7. #7
    New Member adfischer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knotty View Post
    I'm of the philosophy that UQs are limited only by their low temp rating. When it gets too warm in my Winter Nest I simply vent it. Not much you can do if it gets too cold and all you have is a three season UQ.
    My thoughts exactly. Just looking for any downsides to that. Since I sleep cold I really want to make sure I have a good experience during the winter.

  8. #8
    krugd's Avatar
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    I agree with the olast few comments. My first year, or more, I used a winter Phoenix (actually Ptarmigan) from a low as high as 65 to below 30 degrees. At the upper end it was necessary to vent carefully, but it worked. You may have to carry a few extra ounces, but that's about it.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Bomber's Avatar
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    I think you should pick a quilt that is suited to 90% of your hanging needs, if temps get lower you can add a pad + put on more clothes.

    Personally i use a winter incubator all year round(except when kayaking, i use IX) even indoors(around 70f), as long as you change your top layer according to season and vent it, you'll be fine
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  10. #10
    Member Towellie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bomber View Post
    I think you should pick a quilt that is suited to 90% of your hanging needs, if temps get lower you can add a pad + put on more clothes.

    Personally i use a winter incubator all year round(except when kayaking, i use IX) even indoors(around 70f), as long as you change your top layer according to season and vent it, you'll be fine
    Couldn't agree more. I use a 0F Incubator with 3oz overstuff and sleep with the ends open in my 70F house. If I close the ends I'm good from (-10F) to 60F. One quilt to rule them all.... hahahaha

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