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Thread: UQ vs OQ?

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    UQ vs OQ?

    Which is more important for staying warm, an underquilt or overquilt? I'm a noob with 2 sons into hammocks as well. I'm trying to avoid spending all my money at once. Thinking that getting a quality UQ is more important and having either a sleeping bag or a poncho liner on top of me. I plan on being able to camp in below-freezing weather but not too crazy (say in mid-20's and up).

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    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
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    You kinda need both but under insulation is important. Pads work if you can't deal with a UQ right now. Use a sleeping bag in quilt mode.
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    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    The bottom is more important than the top. If you do not get the bottom warm enough with a pad or UQ you will not be able to add enough on top to stay warm. Sleeping bags will work just fine on the top and can be used in quilt mode

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    Senior Member lazy river road's Avatar
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    I believe that both are equally as important because they are a system but in regards to which will provide more warmth for me I always bring an equally rated set or a heavier UQ and a lighter TQ never the other way around. Using that rule of thumb has kept me nice and toasty. But their are also many other ways to keep yourself warm in a hammock like using a pad underneath ya instead of an UQ.
    Sometimes I like to hike and think, And sometimes I just like to hike.

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    Senior Member grich9860's Avatar
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    for me it is the UQ. i am fine with only using minimal top insulation, but if i get CBS then i am up for the entire night.
    Hops

  6. #6
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    I am cold natured,,and the UQ is more important to me,,you can always vent a UQ in warm weather, but below 68 degrees with a lite breeze,,I need a UQ no matter if its just to block the breeze. Even in the house,,have to have a UQ and like I said, you can vent it to your comfort zone, then top quilt is according to what I think the nite will get down to,,as you hammock hang,,you will learn that most here have several setups for the different seasons/weather they are hanging in. Its better to be safe than sorry and cold, so gear up with that in mind.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Trooper's Avatar
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    You must have insulation on bottom. Without proper insulation on bottom, even the loftiest and warmest TQ will leave you cold. It doesn't matter whether you use pads or an underquilt, but you must have something.

    I have found that a good underquilt allows me to use a lighter top quilt, so I think more of the warmth comes from it. It wraps your body, so it makes sense that it is responsible for more coverage and warmth. You can't do this with pads, or not as easily nor comfortably, so your top insulation will become more important.

    Pads work fine, nearly indestructible, and are inexpensive. I carry a Thermarest Z-seat and a similar sized portion of a Thermarest Ridgerest. I roll my tarp inside the Ridgerest and keep it on the outside of my pack. I use the pads to sit on and they keep my feet warm because I have a fractional underquilt. In an emergency, I could theoretically sleep on the ground...haven't tried it.

    Pads are bulky though. My underquilt is one of the best purchases I've made. But, it is expensive and delicate. Pads don't compare to the ease of use, comfort, warmth, and small size in the pack.

    You can save some money if you go with a synthetic quilt over down. It will be heavier, but just as warm and water resistant.

    Your sleeping bag, especially if it has a full zipper will work fine as top insulation. But, it will be heavier than a dedicated top quilt. Fleece blankets, poncho liners, down throws, and even your coat all work fine, but almost never as light as a dedicated top quilt.

    Are you a hiker or a car camper? If you aren't trying to go light, you can save so much money because you probably already have pads, bags, and blankets. If you are a hiker, PM me, as I don't like to mention brand names in the forum.

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