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  1. #1
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Advantage with quilt use to narrow BMBH?

    OK, we all know how I go on and on about how the PeaPod beats every other approach for sheer efficiency and near guaranteed warmth, mostly do to being the most draft free approach. But it is not for every one. Some might find it too confining. Depending on the hammock, to reach it's temp rating on top, it will need some form of added insulation to fill the "gap". It won't work on all hammocks, etc. And I also think the HHSS has at least some of the pod's advantages, more or less.

    But more and more I am a ( JRB or GrizzBridge) bridge fan. Mostly just due to comfort. Every time I lay down in it and immediately have no leg or side comfort issues, 100% of the time, I wonder why I continue fooling with anything else? ( I know there are some reasons or I would have completely switched long ago, still....). Plus, another reason is how the MW4 functions on the BMBH. I think that, along with the PeaPod ( and for me at warmer temps the HHSS) it is maybe the most bombproof of the UQ/hammock systems out there.

    No, you say? Then I will ask a question I have asked before re: the PeaPod: have you ever seen a thread here where somebody used an MW UQ on a BMBH within the temp specs(or even a bit beyond) and had a cold butt or back? Where someone was dealing with gaps on the ends or too tight= compression or it sagged or moved during the night? I never have seen such a thread, just as I also have never experienced such a problem.

    As far as I can tell, if you hang it exactly per JRB directions, there is no gap under me head to toe. True, it is not "closed" on the ends like a pod, but it does seem to come up around the bottom/top edges of the BMBH a bit, and hugs the hammock so closely on the bottom and lower sides, head to foot, that I just can't detect any cold areas no matter what. So, having used both a bunch, I rate the MW4/BMBH right there very close to the pod for preventing drafts under you, with no hassle. ( and the ease of augmenting with a pad is a whole other benefit)

    But for this thread, I want to ask users of both hammock types about TQs and drafts. That is, IMO, where the pod approach is king of the hill. But, lately I'm thinking that the BMBH's lack of shoulder room so oft complained about might actually be an advantage with quilts. ( for me anymore the whole shoulder thing is a bit of a non-issue, but that is a dif thread).

    I'm not sure yet if I am imagining it, but I think it might be easier for me to get the sides tucked and "sealed" with my TQ this hammock than others. And thus more draft free. It seems to be the shape of the hammock. No matter how I lay in it, the sides of the hammock are close enough that I always have a pretty easy time of getting plenty of "tuck" around me, even with my 21 oz TQ, and keeping it there. And it helps that the MWUQ is wrapped all the way around and above where I am trying to tuck the quilt, and it is NOT going to move during the night, and I can not move off of it's insulation. It is attached to loops on the hammock and can not move.

    For example, using another of my fav torso length UQs and this same TQ in a non-bridge hammock, it just seem harder to get things tucked in head to toe and then keep it that way. As I lay on the diagonal, I have to get the UQ situated perfectly on my left shoulder, and try to get the TQ well tucked around my shoulders and neck. While trying to get one perfect, often the other seems to get out of adjustment. And of course any movement by me while asleep can undo all of that. The TQ is tucked tightly at the left shoulder, but things are much looser in the torso and leg area. It just seems easier for things to "open" up along some spot(there is more "room" at the sides), causing a cold air entry point.

    So folks who use a BMBH and other hammock types as well, have you noticed anything like this? Or is it all in my head? Could it be that the narrow disadvantage of this type hammock can be an advantage with TQ use? I am not sure about this yet, but recently I have been noticing that this seems to be the case. I may be wrong.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  2. #2
    Senior Member Southpaw's Avatar
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    I am a very cold sleeper, in fact so much so that I am selling gear to fund a new setup for me to deal with it. That said, the warmest night I have ever slept in a hammock was in the BMBH with a Mt. Washington under it. If the BMBH was wider, that would be my setup no doubt.

  3. #3
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    OK, we all know how I go on and on about how the PeaPod beats every other approach for sheer efficiency and near guaranteed warmth, mostly do to being the most draft free approach. But it is not for every one. Some might find it too confining. Depending on the hammock, to reach it's temp rating on top, it will need some form of added insulation to fill the "gap". It won't work on all hammocks, etc. And I also think the HHSS has at least some of the pod's advantages, more or less.

    But more and more I am a ( JRB or GrizzBridge) bridge fan. Mostly just due to comfort. Every time I lay down in it and immediately have no leg or side comfort issues, 100% of the time, I wonder why I continue fooling with anything else? ( I know there are some reasons or I would have completely switched long ago, still....). Plus, another reason is how the MW4 functions on the BMBH. I think that, along with the PeaPod ( and for me at warmer temps the HHSS) it is maybe the most bombproof of the UQ/hammock systems out there.

    No, you say? Then I will ask a question I have asked before re: the PeaPod: have you ever seen a thread here where somebody used an MW UQ on a BMBH within the temp specs(or even a bit beyond) and had a cold butt or back? Where someone was dealing with gaps on the ends or too tight= compression or it sagged or moved during the night? I never have seen such a thread, just as I also have never experienced such a problem.

    As far as I can tell, if you hang it exactly per JRB directions, there is no gap under me head to toe. True, it is not "closed" on the ends like a pod, but it does seem to come up around the bottom/top edges of the BMBH a bit, and hugs the hammock so closely on the bottom and lower sides, head to foot, that I just can't detect any cold areas no matter what. So, having used both a bunch, I rate the MW4/BMBH right there very close to the pod for preventing drafts under you, with no hassle. ( and the ease of augmenting with a pad is a whole other benefit)

    But for this thread, I want to ask users of both hammock types about TQs and drafts. That is, IMO, where the pod approach is king of the hill. But, lately I'm thinking that the BMBH's lack of shoulder room so oft complained about might actually be an advantage with quilts. ( for me anymore the whole shoulder thing is a bit of a non-issue, but that is a dif thread).

    I'm not sure yet if I am imagining it, but I think it might be easier for me to get the sides tucked and "sealed" with my TQ this hammock than others. And thus more draft free. It seems to be the shape of the hammock. No matter how I lay in it, the sides of the hammock are close enough that I always have a pretty easy time of getting plenty of "tuck" around me, even with my 21 oz TQ, and keeping it there. And it helps that the MWUQ is wrapped all the way around and above where I am trying to tuck the quilt, and it is NOT going to move during the night, and I can not move off of it's insulation. It is attached to loops on the hammock and can not move.

    For example, using another of my fav torso length UQs and this same TQ in a non-bridge hammock, it just seem harder to get things tucked in head to toe and then keep it that way. As I lay on the diagonal, I have to get the UQ situated perfectly on my left shoulder, and try to get the TQ well tucked around my shoulders and neck. While trying to get one perfect, often the other seems to get out of adjustment. And of course any movement by me while asleep can undo all of that. The TQ is tucked tightly at the left shoulder, but things are much looser in the torso and leg area. It just seems easier for things to "open" up along some spot(there is more "room" at the sides), causing a cold air entry point.

    So folks who use a BMBH and other hammock types as well, have you noticed anything like this? Or is it all in my head? Could it be that the narrow disadvantage of this type hammock can be an advantage with TQ use? I am not sure about this yet, but recently I have been noticing that this seems to be the case. I may be wrong.
    BB58, et al,

    Obviously I'm biased here... But... You are absolutely right or the guaranteed perfect fit, no air gaps etc... JRB Mt Washington's on BMBH

    Not only is the TQ tuck issue a piece of cake for BMBH users I'd go so far as to state that the same close side wrap of the MW UQs will let one get away with even lighter TQs on average because using a 48-52 inch TQ when the top gap is 26-30 inches including the tuck means that there is an extra 18 inches or so of TQ to lay bunched or accordianed over oneself thus more loft/warmth ( note the foot box become the weak spot in this "lighter TQ approach" that is where use of the Down Sleeves on the feet or putting ones extra insulation (jacket, fleece ???) in the foot box works to enhance the foot end also.

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  4. #4
    Senior Member JerryW's Avatar
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    I agree with everything stated 100%.

    I'm using a homemade bridge hammock with a matching down underquilt. The underquilt is sewn directly to the sides of the hammock so there is no chance of drafts. It took a little trial and error to get the UQ hanging just right(spaced properly), but now it's perfect for me.

    As with yours, the ends are not attached, but they don't need to be. When lying in the hammock, the UQ hugs the entire bottom, whether I'm lying on my side or back. No cold butt, feet or shoulders.

    Regarding the top quilt, I believe the shape of a bridge just makes it easier to roll and tuck. The side-to-side arc of the hammock allows the top quilt to drape perfectly over the body, it almost tucks itself. It's so simple that I have noticed that I do it in my sleep after changing positions during the night. I don't ever remember waking up with a cold spot, top or bottom with this combo.

    I also believe that the efficiency of the perfectly sealed underquilt makes the whole package a little warmer than any other hammock/quilt combinations I have used before. I recently removed some down from both my top quilt and underquilt because of this efficiency. I have a very light, warm weather set of hammock and quilts and a heavier cold weather setup.

    I'm a happy camper!


    Jerry
    The "Search" function is your friend!

  5. #5
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    OK then, appears I am not imagining this benefit.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  6. #6
    Slowanderer's Avatar
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    JRB BMBH & Accessories

    +1,2,and3 on the comments already stated. IMHO, the Jacks have perfected a fine sleep system!! KUDOs to JRB and thanks for a great product line!!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Ewker's Avatar
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    I know that Hammock Gears underquilts fit the bridge hammock great. Hamhocker has never gotten cold on the sides or the ends using their quilts
    There are times that the only way you can do something is alone that waiting on the convenience of others means that a lot of opportunities will pass you by
    Spirit Walker

    Religion was invented when the first con man met the first fool. ― Mark Twain

    Who cares about showers, gourmet food, using flush toilets. Just keep on walking and being away from it all.

  8. #8
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    TeeDee and I use his Bridges exclusively and his UQs designed especially for his bridges. His UQ has at least two advantages in that it fits his Bridges like a second skin, hence zero air leakage on the sides - simply not possible.

    The ends of the UQ can be sealed to the Bridge end panels or left unsealed, user choice. Sealing the UQ ends to the end panels is advantages on windy nights where the wind shifts constantly and can funnel down the tarp. The Bridge and UQ ends can flap slightly in those conditions and give the possibility of some leakage there. With the UQ ends sealed to the Bridge end panels this is simply not possible. With the UQ ends sealed to the Bridge end panels, you are essentially laying inside a tub formed by the UQ and end panels.

    We have also found that the shape of the Bridge makes the use of a TQ easier in that the sides of the TQ lay against the sides of the Bridge and seal the sides of the TQ against air leakage. This is made even easier with TeeDee's TQ with the draft stoppers. Easy to tuck the draft stoppers without crushing the insulation. The use of the foot box makes tucking around the lower legs and feet easy - just slide the feet into the foot box and the TQ is tucked around the feet and lower legs - no hassle.

    With the UQ insulation on the outer side of the Bridge and the TQ laying against the inside, you have continuous insulation underneath and up the sides. The TQ would thus have to be lifted entirely away from the sides of the hammock for air to get under the TQ. With draft stoppers that is not possible.

    As you say - the Bridge makes the use of TQs much easier.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    After reading this thread, so far:

    There are two pieces of cognitive dissonance when you go to

    http://www.jacksrbetter.com/BMBH.htm

    at this time of year in the Northern Hemisphere:

    First: You look at the picture of the beautiful bridge crossing the Hudson, and you recall a lifetime of signs, warning "Bridge freezes before roads" .

    Wrong, wrong, wrong. Seems all other roads freeze before the JRB BMBH does. No warmer place to be. (Not to mention, there's no sliding toward the middle either.)

    Second bit of cognitive dissonance, or disappointment, going to the bottom of that page, after reading this thread, is this sign in bright yellow:

    TEMPORARILY OUT OF STOCK
    Last edited by DemostiX; 11-05-2011 at 08:49.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Southpaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemostiX View Post
    After reading this thread, so far:

    There are two pieces of cognitive dissonance when you go to

    http://www.jacksrbetter.com/BMBH.htm

    at this time of year in the Northern Hemisphere:

    First: You look at the picture of the beautiful bridge crossing the Hudson, and you recall a lifetime of signs, warning "Bridge freezes before roads" .

    Wrong, wrong, wrong. Seems all other roads freeze BEFORE the JRB BMBH. No warmer place to be. (Not to mention, there's no sliding toward the middle either.)

    Second bit of cognitive dissonance, or disappointment, going to the bottom of that page, after reading this thread, is this sign in bright yellow:

    TEMPORARILY OUT OF STOCK
    The BMBH is the best hammock in my opinion for someone doesn't have wide shoulders, can sleep with their arms behind their head, or likes to be cuddled tightly by their hammock. It's warm, and flat. Easy enough to hang and putting your Mt. Washington quilt on it is effortless.

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