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  1. #1
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    New to the cold, please help

    Hi fellas I am faily new to hammocks but love my "mosquito hammock" jungle hammock. I have used it in warm weather but never in cold weather. I am gona use it this cold season and am unsure of how to keep warm while packing minimally. This site has so much info everywhere you turn that it is hard to sift through it all so I was hoping yall would help me with my certain situation. I have a cheap mat for the bottom insulation right now. Do you think I need a better one if I use a good sleeping bag? Would a good sleeping bag be just fine with no other upgrades? If so what would be a good sleeping bag? I really hate sleeping cold. Thanx for any and all input fellas

  2. #2
    dejoha's Avatar
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    A good closed-cell foam pad (blue pad from WalMart or similar) works fine to keep your back warm. You can invest in a few layers when it's below freezing (32F/0C). I like to cut a large pad in half and use one half turned 90 degrees to cover my shoulders and the other pad for under my lower torso.

    I've used pads in some pretty cold weather. It's a good, inexpensive solution.

    Under quilts that you can pull up under your hammock is the most common way to stay warm in a hammock. Even sleeping bags pulled around your entire hammock work, but with hammocks with built-in bug netting make pull-over or PeaPod-style bags difficult or impossible.

    You can use the sleeping bag you already own inside the hammock.

  3. #3
    gunner76's Avatar
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    Be sure to test your setup under controled conditions so you know if it works as planned. Nothing worse than being out in the woods and finding out your gear does not work as expected.

    I have used a wallyworld blue foam pad many a nights with great results in my double layer hammock. Only issue is that in a single layer hammock, the pad will tend to slip and slide
    Frosty Butt Hang Jan 2015 .................. Fat Butt Hang April 2015

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    I am 18 with 43 years of experience !

  4. #4
    Senior Member Raul Perez's Avatar
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    "If you give a monkey a gun and he shoots someone, you dont blame the monkey"

    The end of the world is not coming in December, it is happening now in my living room. - TFC Rick

    http://watermonkey.net/

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  5. #5
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    Pads are more than adequate, but not as comfortable as an UQ. Still better than sleeping on the ground

    The cost of the mat isn't really relevant - the thickness and material are. CCF ( Closed Cell Foam ) is what you want, and for cold weather (32 F and below) at least 1/2" thick. As mentioned above, adding a second pad in a "t" configuration will give your shoulders/arms insulation and add more insulation beneath your chest where it is most needed. Most pads are relatively inexpensive.

    The sleeping bag is a highly subjective thing. Does your current bag keep you warm on the ground at low temps? If so, it's probably good to go. If not then you may want to start looking at your options.


    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    Under quilts that you can pull up under your hammock is the most common way to stay warm in a hammock.
    Personally I don't agree with this statement. If I had to put money on it, I'd bet far fewer hammockers own UQ's than don't due to the expense and complexity. JMO.
    Experience is the worst teacher - it presents the exam first and the lesson later. - Unknown

  6. #6
    Senior Member Raul Perez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HappyHiker View Post
    Personally I don't agree with this statement. If I had to put money on it, I'd bet far fewer hammockers own UQ's than don't due to the expense and complexity. JMO.
    Cost I'll give you. But complexity is not one of them.
    "If you give a monkey a gun and he shoots someone, you dont blame the monkey"

    The end of the world is not coming in December, it is happening now in my living room. - TFC Rick

    http://watermonkey.net/

    Youtube Channel:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/RaulPerez1?feature=mhee

  7. #7
    New Member
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    Thanx guys thats exactly what I was wandering. Now to get a good bag

  8. #8
    pullarius's Avatar
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    Thanks for those links. I'd seen the first, but the second two were really helpful. I'm going for my first cold (cool?) weather overnight this weekend, with some new gear. Fortunately, Friday night might as well be car camping, and a friend's parents live right next to the parking lot, in case we have to bug out.

  9. #9
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HappyHiker View Post
    Personally I don't agree with this statement. If I had to put money on it, I'd bet far fewer hammockers own UQ's than don't due to the expense and complexity. JMO.
    The research I did for my book from polls on the forums and elsewhere is where I get that metric. Under quilts were by far the most common compared to pads, pull-up bags, and pods.

    Under quilts do not have to be expensive. My designs for the poncho liner under quilt (PLUQ) is very inexpensive (there's even a no-sew version!). There are other ways to get an under quilt that are inexpensive; I've created two for my family out of inexpensive children's sleeping bags from Walmart.

    It might be sixes on complexity, comparing an under quilt with pads. I find that pads are more cumbersome as they slide and move around _inside_ a hammock. Getting into a hammock with pads inside is challenging and I'd say more complex than an underquilt. Now, pads in a double-sided hammock is much easier.

  10. #10
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raul Perez View Post
    Cost I'll give you. But complexity is not one of them.
    Really? Look at the number of threads on properly hanging an UQ. Seem to be quite a few to me.

    There are a good number of ways to hang an UQ using different types of suspensions, and the "best" way to hang one can vary with the type of hammock as well. Once dialed in and any particular idosyncrasies are dealt with, fairly easy to attach - I'll give you that. But getting to that point is not simple. It's not just buy (or make) an UQ, hook it to your hammock and you're done.

    Maybe it's just me, but being new to UQ's has introduced another set of variables to work with in the pursuit of hammock happiness. I'm having fun and enjoying the process - but it is a process and far from simple for anyone who is new to the concepts and usage.
    Experience is the worst teacher - it presents the exam first and the lesson later. - Unknown

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