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  1. #1
    Member trenttyre's Avatar
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    3/8" Webbing for Tree Straps

    Has anyone used under 1" webbing for tree straps? I know the ENO slap strap Micros are about 3/8" wide and that is the only tree strap I know of that is that thin. I am looking at every aspect to cut weight from a WBBB 1.1 double layer and already have Dynaglide whoopie slings with toggles so next on the list would be the tree straps. What does everyone think the smallest tree strap possible is? I know climbing grade webbing that thin will "hold" my weight but is it ok for the tree ... I think it would be fine.

    Thanks in advance for all the help and advice.

  2. #2
    Old Gorge Rat Hawk-eye's Avatar
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    Check out the 1 inch straps Paul sells on Arrowhead Equipment .. they are extremely light weight, work well with Dutch clips and don't stretch like the dreaded slap straps. Besides ... Paul's a stand up feller!

    One inch straps are easier on the bark too ... just saying

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  3. #3
    pgibson's Avatar
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    Climbing webbing while strong enough is always made from Nylon (just like the slap straps) and will stretch on you. Generally a trait that is not wanted in Hammock suspension the way it is in climbing gear.

    While strong enough part of the reason that ethical hangers normally choose 1 inch webbing is to be good stewards of the recourse we depend on...the trees. Ropes that cut into tree bark have given hammockers a bad name in some areas and as such give land managers cause to close access and use of hammocks in parks, forests, preserves and other areas they have control over. Using 1 inch webbing is generally accepted as a better option for not only protecting the trees but keeping up good appearances to land managers that we may run into in the field.

    There are loads of ways to cut weight in your pack, the one that keeps all of us able to use as much of the forests as possible can be trimmed by going to light weight polyester and using the shortest straps that will work for the trees in your area.

    Just for a little bit of reference the difference in a pair of 1" straps and 1/2" straps that are about 6 foot each would be less than the weight of one more energy bar in your pack...under 1.5 ounces saved.
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  4. #4
    Member trenttyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgibson View Post
    Climbing webbing while strong enough is always made from Nylon (just like the slap straps) and will stretch on you. Generally a trait that is not wanted in Hammock suspension the way it is in climbing gear.

    While strong enough part of the reason that ethical hangers normally choose 1 inch webbing is to be good stewards of the recourse we depend on...the trees. Ropes that cut into tree bark have given hammockers a bad name in some areas and as such give land managers cause to close access and use of hammocks in parks, forests, preserves and other areas they have control over. Using 1 inch webbing is generally accepted as a better option for not only protecting the trees but keeping up good appearances to land managers that we may run into in the field.

    There are loads of ways to cut weight in your pack, the one that keeps all of us able to use as much of the forests as possible can be trimmed by going to light weight polyester and using the shortest straps that will work for the trees in your area.

    Just for a little bit of reference the difference in a pair of 1" straps and 1/2" straps that are about 6 foot each would be less than the weight of one more energy bar in your pack...under 1.5 ounces saved.
    Is it really that little for the pair? I figured it would be half b/c you are cutting a little less than half the material out of the strap.

  5. #5
    pgibson's Avatar
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    When your talking about just a few ounces to start with....well cutting much weight out is hard. Generally in my experience thiner webbing is also thicker to make up some strength. Nylon also tends to be heavier...one option if found that is 9/16" wide comes out at over 9 grams per foot, comparatively our is 6 grams per foot for 1".
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  6. #6
    TZBrown's Avatar
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    I have found that 3 foot of 1 inch poly webbing and 2 feet of dynaglide together gives a great tree strap and weighs 20 grams, less than 1 ounce each.

    Make your straps normally then make the dynaglide extensions by splicing a locked brummel loop in each end, then attach to each other through the loops
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  7. #7
    Member jd1987's Avatar
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    smart

    Quote Originally Posted by TZBrown View Post
    I have found that 3 foot of 1 inch poly webbing and 2 feet of dynaglide together gives a great tree strap and weighs 20 grams, less than 1 ounce each.

    Make your straps normally then make the dynaglide extensions by splicing a locked brummel loop in each end, then attach to each other through the loops

    That's a great idea. I've used tree straps, but was switching to amsteel to cut some weight. I backpack in a broad range of tree sizes and 6 foot webbing wasn't cutting it in some areas. But using both dynaglide and webbing for the tree straps might be what I decide to do. That way I can minimize webbing length and weight while having a broad range or tree diameters to hang on. Thanks for the heads up idea.

  8. #8
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TZBrown View Post
    I have found that 3 foot of 1 inch poly webbing and 2 feet of dynaglide together gives a great tree strap and weighs 20 grams, less than 1 ounce each.

    Make your straps normally then make the dynaglide extensions by splicing a locked brummel loop in each end, then attach to each other through the loops
    I have pair made up like that.

    I wish that at miniscule cost in weight and material, I had padded the larks-head knot with a few scraps of Amsteel. Not that I want to take the assembly apart, long impossible after bearing a load, but just on the likelihood that a larger knot would be less likely to break or tear.

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