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  1. #11
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    I get sweaty feet, and I use a product called Drysol. This is what runway models use, because they can't have underarm sweat when they are modelling clothes. You can apply it to specific areas (such as your hands) and you won't sweat for a week. I always apply it to my feet before I go hiking.

    However, if you just sweat from everywhere, then this product might not work for you. There are surgical approaches to hyperhidrosis, but I wouldn't touch that with a ten-foot pole.

    Drysol can be ordered on the web, or you can go to your doctor and get a prescription.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    Mancat, have you tried removing your outer layers with the exception of a wicking baselayer when you're active?

    When you BEGIN to sweat, remove your gloves/mittens as well if you need to, in order to keep them dry.

    Seriously, if you're getting that warm, you might be able to hike in what most folks would consider summer clothing...a wicking baselayer shirt and a pair of synthetic trail pants.

    If you start to get cold, put on ONE piece of next layer clothing at a time until you're JUST comfortable again.

    I have to agree with the others...if you're sweating that much...you're wearing too much clothing.

    Realize I'm at the 200lb mark myself, and sweat more now than I EVER did, but it's still manageable if you work your layering right.

    That's WHY you layer.

    If you are overheating or sweating...remove a layer.

    There are folks who hike in this weather in a kilt...comfortably!

    You might be one of them.

    Having dry clothing to throw on once you're done moving/sweating will make all the comfort difference in the world for you.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mancat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mancat View Post
    I never wear cotton and usually wear very little. If you are able to regulate your temp with layers I am envious. I have tried it and can't do it.
    The problem is I can't hike nude. Which is what it would take. I appreciate everyone saying I am wearing too much, but again I am not going to hike nude. I just got my kilt this year and it has made a world of difference below the waist. I still sweat a lot but no where near as bad. I am going to try my kilt, baselayer or exofficios, gaiters(if needed), merino wool t-shirt(lightweight), windbreaker(if needed), and I also have sleeves made from a moisture wicking shirt if I need them. The only other thing I can think of is I might need a full zip wicking t-shirt with the back cut out and worn over the shoulder straps.
    Last edited by Mancat; 12-08-2011 at 17:47.
    "If animals could speak the dog would be a blundering outspoken fellow, but the cat would have the rare grace of never saying a word too much."
    - Mark Twain

    "FOR THE LOVE OF GOD! NO MORE WOOD!"
    - Mancat

  4. #14
    kayak karl's Avatar
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    mist mittens

    Quote Originally Posted by Mancat View Post
    What is a mist mitten?
    http://www.backpackgeartest.org/revi...ichard%20Lyon/
    mine are DIY from this pattern
    http://www.thru-hiker.com/projects/mitten_pattern.php
    "Tenting is equivalent to a bum crawling into a cardboard box, hammocking is an art" KK

  5. #15
    Senior Member Mancat's Avatar
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    Thanks Karl now I just need to drum up waterproof breathable scraps just enough for mittens.
    "If animals could speak the dog would be a blundering outspoken fellow, but the cat would have the rare grace of never saying a word too much."
    - Mark Twain

    "FOR THE LOVE OF GOD! NO MORE WOOD!"
    - Mancat

  6. #16
    Senior Member Gra_factor's Avatar
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    Cycling shorts have always had a gusset made from much the same stuff as chamois, so it works in that situation.
    "Dyslexic knot unravellers of the world, UNITE!"

  7. #17
    Senior Member Meriadoc's Avatar
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    Mancat, I know what you are talking about, I am in the same boat. At least I think so, if you can beat me then I can finally pass on this crown I've been given by my buddies.

    At 25 degrees I wear the thinnest base layer short sleeve shirt and the thinnest layer shorts. And I still sweat.

    I've found two different things to work.
    (1) Like you described using, wool. It retains the moisture more than some base layers but while I'm moving it keeps me warm even when it's wet. With the microweight smartwool t-shirt it was very critical when I stop that I either switch it out for a dry layer or put on a warm layer over it immediately. I carry a base layer for camp when using this shirt.

    (2) Underarmor cold weather gear. This is the best shirt I ever bought. I use it hiking, skiing, just hanging around town. It's warm and wicks very well. I find that I can wear it even in the 30s and 40s because it wicks so well. And it doesn't cool me down nearly as much when I stop so it's not as critical that I change base layers. Often I will wear the same base layer the entire time even after it's been soaked because it is still warm. This shirt is on every winter trip.

    One caveat is that I have not gone on extended (longer than three day) winter backpacking trips. On those, I imagine a vapor barrier becomes more important to keep moisture out of your insulation.

    Oh, and it really sucks but when it's a serious safety issue, I will slow down a lot. I'll let hikers whom I can hike circles around pass me. I will let 102 year-olds beat me to the top. A crawling baby could probably pass me. I generally hike/backpack at 3-3.5 mph.

    Can anyone who has a similar sweating issue speak to backpacking in extreme cold? I'm thinking from 10 degrees Fahrenheit and down. I have read that at extreme temperatures vapor barriers can work better. I'm wondering how cold it has to be before someone like me can use a vapor barrier.

    Sorry for the derail...I forgot the thread is about shamwow clothing! :P
    Last edited by Meriadoc; 12-08-2011 at 20:45. Reason: Derail
    "Not all those who wander are lost."
    Appalachian Trail Thru Hike Blog

  8. #18
    Senior Member Mancat's Avatar
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    I tried the shamwow and it was an epic fail. So derail all you want. I am getting some great ideas on how to adjust my kit. Thanks every body. Keep the discussion rolling.
    "If animals could speak the dog would be a blundering outspoken fellow, but the cat would have the rare grace of never saying a word too much."
    - Mark Twain

    "FOR THE LOVE OF GOD! NO MORE WOOD!"
    - Mancat

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