Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Like Lewis & Clark: Wintrin' o/t Columbia again: PDX
    Hammock
    Clark w 2QZQ mod,Tropical, NX;Nano
    Tarp
    Clark micro
    Insulation
    Major down
    Suspension
    7/64 SK75 +strap
    Posts
    2,337
    Images
    13

    Dare you to make sense of colors

    Right: Dark going all the way to black to best soak up infra-red radiation. And / so it is helpful to grab that infra-red from sunlight in order to dry the quilt, even on cold days, more likely lightly wet from dew than seriously from being drenched.

    So: Why do UQs, following your conversations with several makers, differ so in inside color, from having (reflective (?) silver on the underside to black as black can be?

    Has anyone confirmed the benefits of one vs another on the top side of the UQ as sizeable?

    Note: I can understand black on the outside for reasons first presented, and for stealth.
    Last edited by DemostiX; 12-22-2011 at 21:45. Reason: case

  2. #2
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    wilmington, nc
    Hammock
    BB1.0 double
    Tarp
    Hybrid Cuben F.
    Insulation
    Down & IX
    Suspension
    BB straps,whoopies
    Posts
    1,374
    I personally haven't noticed any differences in my under quilts due to having different colors on the inner layer (the layer that touches the bottom of the hammock). I've made quite a few and the color hasn't made me any warmer or colder. Now I did find a difference when I used breathable vs waterproof DWR material. I found that (for me!!) I like having a breathable ripstop as the inner layer on my under quilts. I like waterproof DWR on the outer layer. Again, the color different make any difference. I even used hot pink!! The only time I've found black to make a difference is if I'm able to lay out my quilts during the daytime. The black will heat up way faster in direct sunlight. I've found color to make a difference on being stealthy. If it makes a difference in how warm a quilt is, I personally am not able to tell it. I'm such a cold sleeper, that I don't think the color would make any difference to me anyways. Maybe to some of you guys that are hot sleepers, you would be able to tell a difference between simular quilts but different colors?

  3. #3
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Hammock
    Speer,DIY,GT
    Tarp
    Gargoyle Custom
    Insulation
    HG,JRB,Leigh,Speer
    Suspension
    disbelief
    Posts
    2,249
    Images
    11
    Having a dark color on at least one side helps with field drying. Since black absorbs more long wave energy (sun light), it will dry a quilt out faster than a lighter colored one.
    The silver colored ones are radiant barriers, so they will reflect radiant heat away from the quilt and in theory back to the hammock occupant. The reality is that if your have even a single layer of clothing on over 80% of your radiant heat loss is already blocked, so at best the radiant reflector is reflecting 90% of the remaining 20%.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    Practically, I don't think it makes a real difference in how warm you feel. But since we like to get all technical here...

    Black both absorbs and transmits heat faster. That means it'll soak up the sunlight's energy quicker in the daytime AND transmit heat away from you faster at night.

    Silver is the opposite...if it's on the inner liner of a quilt, it will reflect more energy back at your body (rather than absorbing it) than black will. It's also slower to dissipate the energy that it does absorb.

    But I think the difference can probably be measured in a fraction of a degree for this application. Managing condensation, for example, probably has a much larger "felt impact" than color of quilt and liner.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  5. #5
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Hammock
    Speer,DIY,GT
    Tarp
    Gargoyle Custom
    Insulation
    HG,JRB,Leigh,Speer
    Suspension
    disbelief
    Posts
    2,249
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    Practically, I don't think it makes a real difference in how warm you feel. But since we like to get all technical here...

    Black both absorbs and transmits heat faster. That means it'll soak up the sunlight's energy quicker in the daytime AND transmit heat away from you faster at night.

    Silver is the opposite...if it's on the inner liner of a quilt, it will reflect more energy back at your body (rather than absorbing it) than black will. It's also slower to dissipate the energy that it does absorb.

    But I think the difference can probably be measured in a fraction of a degree for this application. Managing condensation, for example, probably has a much larger "felt impact" than color of quilt and liner.
    I don't believe the colors make much of a difference when it's dark as there is far less long wave radiation at play. During the day, the dark color will heat up much more (allowing you to dry your gear even when it is below freezing). That is why summer clothing is light colored and also why I keep kicking myself for buying a black Suburban.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    That's true for absorbing energy in the sunlight...but it's just as true for dissipating energy in the nighttime.

    Either way, I don't think it makes much difference in how warm you feel...but I've never measured it.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  7. #7
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Hammock
    Speer,DIY,GT
    Tarp
    Gargoyle Custom
    Insulation
    HG,JRB,Leigh,Speer
    Suspension
    disbelief
    Posts
    2,249
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    That's true for absorbing energy in the sunlight...but it's just as true for dissipating energy in the nighttime.

    Either way, I don't think it makes much difference in how warm you feel...but I've never measured it.
    I guess my point was that enthalpy is at play day or night with energy seeking to reach an equilibrium state by migrating from higher concentrations to lower concentrations. The difference between day and night would be that during the day, the sun is the higher concentration and at night YOU are the higher concentration. The amount of radiant heat that any colored object would release or absorb at night is a fraction of the amount of radiant heat to be absorbed or released during the day. The average human gives off about 250 BTU/hr during rest which results in about 75 Watts. With a layer of clothing (not even counting multiple layers or TQ/UQ) the potential for radiant heat loss is reduced by over 80%. If all of that energy were released in the form of radiant heat (which it is not by a long shot), it would still only equate to 15 Watts. Contrast that to a square meter of sunlight putting out an average of 1000 Watts and the order of magnitude becomes more evident.

    To quote Sgt. Rock, "Heat reflectors are snake oil."

    Disclaimer: The last time I took a thermodynamics class, Reagan was President.
    Last edited by wisenber; 12-24-2011 at 21:40.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    Yeah - sounds like we're saying pretty much the same thing in different ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by wisenber View Post
    To quote Sgt. Rock, "Heat reflectors are snake oil."
    Yup.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  9. #9
    Senior Member MedicineMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Roan Mountain,TN
    Hammock
    Traveler with HNO AirShip
    Tarp
    HNO AirShip
    Insulation
    Leiglo 5/50
    Suspension
    Everything Dutch
    Posts
    5,659
    Images
    76
    and I think that is why WB stopped with his snap in reflector for his Yetis.

  10. #10
    Senior Member te-wa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    arizona
    Hammock
    BB
    Tarp
    zpacks cuben
    Insulation
    te-wa Freeze
    Suspension
    whoOpie slings
    Posts
    1,396
    Images
    129
    i use silver on the inside just because its pretty much just a generic color. more eyebrows would be raised in question if the underside of my quilts were yellow, or red.. silver is just like gray is for tarps.. there.
    new site! new gear! www.tewaunderquilts.com
    follow me on facebook!

Similar Threads

  1. Trying to make sense.
    By Beardly in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-04-2013, 14:46
  2. Does this make sense?
    By hattywaiverwireguru in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-06-2013, 16:07
  3. Now this does not make sense to me
    By southmark in forum Trip Reports
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-26-2012, 15:58
  4. Does this make sense?
    By HangingKayaker in forum Weather Protection
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-30-2012, 09:14
  5. Does This Make Sense?
    By Str1der in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 06-13-2011, 08:51

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •