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  1. #1
    Senior Member rigidpsycho's Avatar
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    be careful while hiking

    I didn't know where to put this, but here it is. I think we should all take in consideration of the terrain that we all hike on. Here in KY we have a number of hikers who are seriously injured or killed every year at Red River Gorge. The latest victim was a gentleman who was very familar with the area in which he was hiking and camping. He was last seen on June 15th by his family when he headed to the gorge to camp.
    After two weeks of searching his body was found yesterday about one mile from his campsite. So let's keep his family in our prayers and remember to always be careful when you are out in the woods or the water(canoeing). here are couple of articles about the search http://www.wlky.com/news/16689789/de...s=lou&psp=news. http://wtvq.com/news/1-latest/468-bo...-in-gorge.html
    Last edited by rigidpsycho; 06-29-2008 at 08:53.
    Chris

  2. #2
    Senior Member Greg Dunlap's Avatar
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    ID that you wear

    I posted this on the forum that was organizing a paddling trip and thought it would go well here. I wear one of these http://www.roadid.com whenever I go out in my kayak. It has on it my name, contact numbers, blood type, and medications I take. I figure that if I ever wash up somewhere and am unable to speak for myself, this will help whoever rescues me.

    They are inexpensive, you fill out the information you want displayed yourself, and they are made with a reflective stitching so even in the dark, they are noticeable. Something to consider an keeping yourself safe out there.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Yep gotta be careful out there. Here's a recent death here in Georgia.

    www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/archive/6295/
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  4. #4
    Senior Member rigidpsycho's Avatar
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    One of the members of a local wilderness forum I also go to, his ife has known this guys since high school, so he and a few other members of the forum all went down tho the gorge Friday and Saturday to help in the search. This makes it difficult for me as I like the gorge, but since I am just getting back into camping and backpacking it just makes my wife and kids worry more and more about saying I want to go to the gorge to camp.
    Chris

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Every place has it's own dangers and challenges. Crossing the road is no less dangerous imo than hiking. This is not to diminish the tragedy, but in fact family and spouses who decide we are safer on town roads than we are on the trails can be profoundly mistaken. Sense, preparedness and knowledge are the keys in any situation.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

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  6. #6
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Every place has it's own dangers and challenges. Crossing the road is no less dangerous imo than hiking. This is not to diminish the tragedy, but in fact family and spouses who decide we are safer on town roads than we are on the trails can be profoundly mistaken. Sense, preparedness and knowledge are the keys in any situation.
    Well said. Driving to wally world is more dangerous than hiking.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Every place has it's own dangers and challenges. Crossing the road is no less dangerous imo than hiking. This is not to diminish the tragedy, but in fact family and spouses who decide we are safer on town roads than we are on the trails can be profoundly mistaken. Sense, preparedness and knowledge are the keys in any situation.
    Quote Originally Posted by FanaticFringer View Post
    Well said. Driving to wally world is more dangerous than hiking.
    I just got back from the Gorge from an overnight. I used to think this way, but no so anymore. So far in my 13-14 years as a driver, I have been in 2 finder binders. Nothing serious, just body damage. I started back hiking about 3 years ago or so. Since than I have had 3 major ankle sprains, plantar facitious, thrown my back out twice, garidia, and had more falls, scratches, cuts, and brusies than I care to think of. I also know people directly who have had ankle sprains, garidia, struck by lighting, multiple broken bones, and a heart attack (at the tender age of 31).

    I have had a lot of close calls driving. I also can think of some closer calls hiking or canoeing. Definitly times where I am lucky on both not to be hurt.

    I should add that I go hiking, boating, dayhiking, or something pretty much every weekend. So my odds are probibly a bit higher than most on this site.

    So too me, my odds of getting hurt or killed vs someone with the exact same life style expect for outdoor sports is way higher. I try to find a good balance between being careful and having fun. But I also know that is not a matter of if I will get hurt again it is when and how bad.
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  8. #8
    neo's Avatar
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    me and my youngest son had a close call on the harpeth river last month.we are both very experinced kayakers.any we remained calm and stayed focused till we got out of the river.neo
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  9. #9
    canoebie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    I just got back from the Gorge from an overnight. I used to think this way, but no so anymore. So far in my 13-14 years as a driver, I have been in 2 finder binders. Nothing serious, just body damage. I started back hiking about 3 years ago or so. Since than I have had 3 major ankle sprains, plantar facitious, thrown my back out twice, garidia, and had more falls, scratches, cuts, and brusies than I care to think of. I also know people directly who have had ankle sprains, garidia, struck by lighting, multiple broken bones, and a heart attack (at the tender age of 31).

    I have had a lot of close calls driving. I also can think of some closer calls hiking or canoeing. Definitly times where I am lucky on both not to be hurt.

    I should add that I go hiking, boating, dayhiking, or something pretty much every weekend. So my odds are probibly a bit higher than most on this site.

    So too me, my odds of getting hurt or killed vs someone with the exact same life style expect for outdoor sports is way higher. I try to find a good balance between being careful and having fun. But I also know that is not a matter of if I will get hurt again it is when and how bad.
    When I take groups out, I spend a great deal of time emphasizing safety to reduce risk. There are risks that are perceived and those that are not. Most do not perceive the drive to wally world as dangerous, yet statistically it most likely is higher.

    I do explain to folks I take on canoe trips that in reality the drive to the river is most likely more dangerous than the paddle on the river. However, training and risk management are an essential part of the experience. I have strict "community guidelines" that everyone must sign a waiver agreeing to or they cannot participate. I think this really helps to minimize risk.

    A simple thing for example is that I do not allow anyone to run. Reason being is that there are numerous "beaver chews" in the area resulting in stumps 2-6 inches in diameter coming to a perfect point 2-3 feet off the ground. Imagine falling and impaling yourself on one of those. Not to mention an ankle twist, sprain or fracture.

    I also illustrate the importance of not taking unnecessary risk with a story of a coleader I took once who wanted to wash his face in the river, stepped on a wet log, slipped and hurt his tailbone so bad he was literally in tears for two days. Or when someone dove into the river to "refresh" and hit their head on a rock that then required some butterflies and superglue, and they could not get wet the rest of the trip. I tell stories not to frighten, but to inform.

    These stories then lead to discussion about "unnecessary risk" and I challenge folks to identify those potential risks throughout the trip. It becomes a game that heightens their awareness.

    Everything we do has risk, we just have to use the gray matter between our ears to do everything we can to minimize it. Even then, stuff happens. Then we have to be prepared as first responders and take lessons away from potential or real tragedy that will minimize risk brought about by the next opportunity for a great outdoor experience.

    I have been paddling for 32 years, and have done up to class IV water with an open canoe. I have been a swimmer on more than one occasion, sometimes unprepared. However as time has passed, I have used the lessons of the past to better prepare for each upcoming trip. I work hard at preparation, and staying in shape. I also have had first aid and advanced CPR training as well as lifeguard training. A little information, well presented combined with using every opportunity that presents itself to teach people while out there makes a huge difference. We learn little from what we hear or see, we learn most from what we do. That is what makes outdoor adventure such a potent tool for changing lives. Working cooperatively with a partner in a canoe or a buddy on a hike can sometimes make life easier, or at other times it may mean saving a life. Either way, learning happens.

    Giardia may happen, but with careful hygiene, it can be prevented. Most sprains, cuts, etc. are the result of bad decisions. Burns are usually the result of carelessness, yet there is always a fire bug in every group I take out that I have to teach safety to. I then encourage them to safely tend the fire. We have to be ever vigilant as we use our judgement to keep ourselves safe as well as those for whom we have responsibility.

    I learn something every trip. Part of my job, part of my responsibility to those around me, is share the wealth of experience, both good and bad, so they do not suffer through, but rather enjoy their outdoor adventure.

    My $.02.

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  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by canoebie View Post
    When I take groups out, I spend a great deal of time emphasizing safety to reduce risk. There are risks that are perceived and those that are not. Most do not perceive the drive to wally world as dangerous, yet statistically it most likely is higher.

    I do explain to folks I take on canoe trips that in reality the drive to the river is most likely more dangerous than the paddle on the river. However, training and risk management are an essential part of the experience. I have strict "community guidelines" that everyone must sign a waiver agreeing to or they cannot participate. I think this really helps to minimize risk.

    A simple thing for example is that I do not allow anyone to run. Reason being is that there are numerous "beaver chews" in the area resulting in stumps 2-6 inches in diameter coming to a perfect point 2-3 feet off the ground. Imagine falling and impaling yourself on one of those. Not to mention an ankle twist, sprain or fracture.

    I also illustrate the importance of not taking unnecessary risk with a story of a coleader I took once who wanted to wash his face in the river, stepped on a wet log, slipped and hurt his tailbone so bad he was literally in tears for two days. Or when someone dove into the river to "refresh" and hit their head on a rock that then required some butterflies and superglue, and they could not get wet the rest of the trip. I tell stories not to frighten, but to inform.

    These stories then lead to discussion about "unnecessary risk" and I challenge folks to identify those potential risks throughout the trip. It becomes a game that heightens their awareness.

    Everything we do has risk, we just have to use the gray matter between our ears to do everything we can to minimize it. Even then, stuff happens. Then we have to be prepared as first responders and take lessons away from potential or real tragedy that will minimize risk brought about by the next opportunity for a great outdoor experience.

    I have been paddling for 32 years, and have done up to class IV water with an open canoe. I have been a swimmer on more than one occasion, sometimes unprepared. However as time has passed, I have used the lessons of the past to better prepare for each upcoming trip. I work hard at preparation, and staying in shape. I also have had first aid and advanced CPR training as well as lifeguard training. A little information, well presented combined with using every opportunity that presents itself to teach people while out there makes a huge difference. We learn little from what we hear or see, we learn most from what we do. That is what makes outdoor adventure such a potent tool for changing lives. Working cooperatively with a partner in a canoe or a buddy on a hike can sometimes make life easier, or at other times it may mean saving a life. Either way, learning happens.

    Giardia may happen, but with careful hygiene, it can be prevented. Most sprains, cuts, etc. are the result of bad decisions. Burns are usually the result of carelessness, yet there is always a fire bug in every group I take out that I have to teach safety to. I then encourage them to safely tend the fire. We have to be ever vigilant as we use our judgement to keep ourselves safe as well as those for whom we have responsibility.

    I learn something every trip. Part of my job, part of my responsibility to those around me, is share the wealth of experience, both good and bad, so they do not suffer through, but rather enjoy their outdoor adventure.

    My $.02.

    David

    Well put. An opinion that I respect, just different from my own.

    I know my opinion is probibly in the minority. I just think as it goes everyone will get hurt in some way when they are doing outdoor activities regardless of how safe they try to be. To me that just goes along with the territory.

    I try not to go into statistics. If you only take the precentage of people that hike for instance on 2 3-day trips a month that get an injury, and compare that to the precentage of people that get into a car accident of the same age group. I would hazard to guess that more injuries come from the hikers.

    I think if we polled all the users on hammock forums. Asked them who has been injuried in a car accident and who has been injuried in an outdoor rec activity. The majority will be in outdoor sports.

    Oh and I can't believe I left off my bruised tailbone. That was a huge PITA for long time.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

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