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  1. #11
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    I had no idea there were this many options/companies with hammocks. I thought I was being unique.

  2. #12
    Senior Member 6 feet over's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by angrysparrow View Post
    Welcome to the forum.

    The biggest reason that most people experience cold in their hammock is because they don't have enough insulation beneath them, and air movement robs them of their warmth.

    There are really two approaches to fixing that.
    1 - Underquilts - quilts that are filled with either down or synthetic insulation that are suspended beneath the hammock, and provide insulating 'loft' to retain your warmth. These are generally the most comfortable option, but are the most expensive.
    2 - Pads - using a sleeping pad beneath you is a very cost effective method of retaining warmth. They are typically inexpensive, but can be a little tricky to stay on top of while laying in the hammock.

    If you want to look at quilts, have a look at JRB and Speer. They both have good commercially available solutions.

    If you want to look at pads, even the typical blue walmart pads insulate well. Have a look at the Speer SPE, though. It is designed to help you stay on top of a pad while in a hammock.

    Again, welcome. Let us know how it goes for you.
    Great advice, listing the best options without pushing one way or the other.
    The harder I work, the luckier I get.

  3. #13
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Ditto what every body has already said. It would seem that volume is a severe limitation for you, that is the main problem you have to overcome. Man, we ultra-light hikers might could learn something from you guys.

    I don't know, is it going to be reasonable to try and roll up a pad and strap it to that bicycle? Maybe under the seat or strapped to one of the down bars instead of handle bars?

    Can you carry anything on your back( boy would that solve most of the "not enough room" problems if you could!), or does it need to all go on the bike? Are panniers an option?

    Unless you can carry something on your back or add panniers ( is that the right word?) to your bike, it seems to me a down underquilt ( JRB or Speer) is about your only option, and even that is going to be tough to find room for unless you get a summer weight quilt.

    The Hennessy Super Shelter open cell foam pad and undercover can be squeezed down pretty small, especially if you use a compression stuff sack. Plus, it is pretty weather resistant. But I'm not sure if it would be any smaller than a down UQ, and probably not as small as a down summer weight quilt. I remember it came in a very small package, but I don't think you could get down that small after opening it without a compression sack. I have done it, but it is a real pain. With the space blanket, and SET UP PROPERLY, it would easily keep me warm at those temps and quite a bit cooler. But I suggest you practice with it before hitting the trail. The same goes for down underquilts.

    I would say an SPE and pad if you can find a place to carry the pad. That will also be the cheapest and lightest option and you won't have to worry about getting it wet. And there is not much practice required, just lay on it. But it will take up more room than any of the other options.

    Good luck, and welcome to the forum.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #14
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    The bags I use are custom from Carousel Design Works. The reason most endurance riders use those vs. a pannier setup is that you get rid of the metal frames that usually break in the middle of no where. I've even seen those beefy seatpost mounted flat racks break after days of singletrack abuse. In that front bag I carry my sleeping bag, hammock, arm and knee warmers, base layer and a hat. The rear bag contains nothing but 6 days worth of Hammer Perpetuem liquid food and Hammer Recoverite recovery drink. I use a Camelback Megamouth (1100cu in) pack. It carries rain gear, tools, 100oz bladder, cook kit, some backpacker meals. That thing is packed. I'm definitely limited on space at this point.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    The drag penalty for adding anything like panniers would mean you might as well stay home. You _might_ be able to wrap a short pad around the down tube... but I would be afraid it would disrupt your stroke. a seat post rack would not serve your needs, I agree. You also wouldn't want to increase your backpack size for fear of disrupting your center of gravity, an all important stability factor on single track mountain stuff.

    What are you using for a cook kit?
    Can you minimize the stove and maybe gain some space there? Maybe go alky if you are not already?

    Also look into the Freezer bag cooking where you cook and eat right out of the bag. You still need a pot, but a lot of ultralighters use beer cans for a cook pot and everything fits inside it.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  6. #16
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by riverfever View Post
    ...I'm definitely limited on space at this point.
    That being the case, a down underquilt is your ticket. Returning to the "protect only the torso" theme, if you could get a short length underquilt such as some here have made, then you'd be set, about half the bulk of the ones Pan mentioned (which nevertheless are quit nice and do pack down). I'd offer to sell you mine, 'cept it is in use in the coming weeks and I lack the time to make another.

    You might PM warbonnetguy and see if he has one of his 1/2 length underquilts he'd be willing to part with. A neighbor of yours almost, lives in Fort Collins. Might be off getting married or something though, he's not logged into HF since June 30.

    Grizz

  7. #17
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    My cook kit consists of a Snowpeak Giga Ti stove, the smallest Snowpeak fuel canister, and a small ti pot/lid. I try and eat 2 freeze dried meals each day to get some solid food in me to counter all the liquid meals and any chance of the squirts. I can re-supply in towns (I plan on grabbing more of tha backpacker meals and GU, etc.). I can also buy things so I do plan on getting a meal (and a beer) in any towns I roll through. I just can't cache anything. Also eat GU, Clif Blocks and bars here and there as well.

    Ramblinrev...sorry...are you talking about the meals where you just boil water and put it in the bag and seal it up and eat 5 minutes later?

  8. #18
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by riverfever View Post
    ...are you talking about the meals where you just boil water and put it in the bag and seal it up and eat 5 minutes later?

    Freezer Bag Cooking
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

  9. #19
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    ok... yeah... boiled water meals. Sarbar has some great ideas for those. www.freezerbagcooking.com

    Do you have scheduled breaks (stage race) or is every minute on the clock? Alky stoves take a little longer to boil water but for just a cup or two probably not significantly longer. You save the weight and space of the canister. A small yellow bottle of HEET can serve as fuel, available pretty much where ever you would roll through.

    You could cram a half UQ into the space of the stove and cannisters without a significant increase in weight penalty I would think. Triagia (sp) stoves are well thought of and very light. The biggest issue would be altitude and that might require a cannister stove. You would that better than I. The other good thing about alky is you can carry it in any kind of plastic bottle... But DON"T confuse it for water. That's dangerous and nasty. (I can't believe I am advocating alky cooking)

    beyond that... can you make a frame corner bag http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...20Frame%20Bags

    now on sale at a really cheap price. That could store some stuff that would free space else where and might even allow you t grab a gel pac on the road instead of from your rear bag. Every cubic inch of space counts just as much as weight. Stick a wedge bag under your saddle and store knee warmers in there. Squeeze every cubic inch out of your system that you can. Hide things you "won't need" but have to have inside the seat tube or the handlebars. If you need that stuff you are SOL for a quick time anyway. Be exceptionally creative with your packing. It is simply imperative that you "find" space for insulation if you are going to be warm. Smoothly lay a balaclava on top of your chamois (I can't believe I just typed that.) You need head warmth at night. That will make a HUGE difference. Find space you did not even think was there.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

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  10. #20
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    That's an interesting site. I'm disappointed I didn't find this site a year ago. I thought I made some real good decisions with gear and now you all are throwing out stuff that has me scratching my head. I've learned a lot tonight.

    I just set up the hammock for tonight and I see what you all are saying about the pad sliding around. I definitely see what Sgt. Rock talked about with having more pad in the shoulder/butt area. Lots to think about but I'm running out of time to get things dialed in and it makes me nervous to deviate too much from my plan but the weakest links right now are my sleeping system and water purification. Both of those issues are serious ones that could really present a problem. I know if I don't sleep it'll be lights out.

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