Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 54
  1. #21
    Dutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Reinholds, PA
    Hammock
    Bridgeskin
    Tarp
    DIY Blackcat
    Insulation
    DIY Quilts
    Suspension
    Whoopie sling
    Posts
    6,798
    Images
    198
    I have joked around about food, but that is an area that I have made the biggest gains. I have been counting my calories each time and readusting for the next trip. I have been averaging 2600 calories per day. If I were to be out more than 2 nights that number starts to go up a little. The last 2 trips i went home with a pack of oreos. For where I hike that is just about the margin of safety needed. If I lose a pound of body fat in the process, I concider that a bonus. About 50% of the time I don't carry a stove which also removes spork, pot, and fuel.

    I also monitor my water very closely. That is the heaviest thing in my pack. I drink a gallon a day so I have to refill my 2 liter platypus twice. If there is a reliable water source every 5 miles or so I will only carry 1 liter. I also camel up before I leave and at water sources.

    Since this is HF the rest of the gear is more on subject. I concider my hammock, tarp, quilts, pads, headlamp, raingear, clothes, and sometimes my pack to all be part of my sleep system. It mostly has to do with comfort, but safety has a big roll too. I really don't compromise much on these items. All those items come to about 6 to 9 pounds depending on the weather. I much rather scimp on food and have to resupply then get cold at night. I still only carry the smallest tarp that will keep me dry and the lightest quilt. I use running tights for sleeping and for camp in the morning. I like my 3/4 quilt and prefer it over a lighter pad.

    The rest of my pack is just a small first aid kit, toiletries, and maybe a phone, Ipod, and a camera.

    I don't understand what people carry to get over 30 pounds, but I know when I started backpacking my pack weighed that much or more.

    For the most part I am talking about backpacking and not camping. When I camp I just bring it all.
    Peace Dutch
    GA>ME 2003


    http://dutchwaregear.com
    Visit Dutchwaregear on facebook (and like it)
    Check us out on Twitter @dutchwaregear

  2. #22
    Senior Member cavediver2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern IL
    Hammock
    CLARK NX-200 / Clark NA /Warbonnet
    Tarp
    CLARK NX-200 TARP
    Insulation
    PAD and BAG
    Posts
    826
    Images
    33
    Yes when I pack in to camp from a car I bring allot more than I would if I were hiking. As for extra clothing I to have poly pro top/bottom and I too wear it to bed or around camp I have an extra shirt/socks/underwear/pants. I use a MSR pocketrocket and canister for short weekend trips and use a alchy stove for longer.

    maybe one of these day's I will compile a list
    of stuff I have and use and we will tear it down
    on here.

  3. #23
    Senior Member BurningCedar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Missouri
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered End
    Tarp
    HG Cuben w/Doors
    Insulation
    Yeti or JRB Quilt
    Suspension
    Whoopie Sling
    Posts
    526
    Images
    9
    I started off as the traditional ground-dwelling, heavy-duty backpacker. On my trip to Philmont with my son (which started this whole craze for me), my pack weight without food or water was 45 pounds That was for a 10-day mountain trek.

    I immensely enjoyed Philmont; but knew there had to be a better (lighter) way. The absolutely, hands-down, best resource for lightweight backpacking info I've discovered is the Backpacking Light (BPL) website. If you're interested in lightening up, the modest membership fee is well worth it (and many of the articles and the forums are available for free). Using the collected advice on that site, I got my base weight down to under 10 pounds.

    But now a different comfort problem arose. I'm pushing the high end of middle age and sleeping on the ground with a thin (but light!) pad made for uncomfortable sleepless nights and resulting tiring days.

    I decided that somewhere between conventional heavyweight and lightweight backpacking lied the ideal "comfortweight" And hammocks provided most of that solution. Since that time I've spent three-times as much time on this forum as on BPL. (BPL is great, but very very few members have any experience or knowledge of hammocking)

    Lightweight IS good -- to the point that you don't sacrifice safety or make it so uncomfortable that you stop enjoying the endeavor. Lightweight means you can safely trek farther, see more, and do so without the aches of a heavy load.

    I think a lightweight hammocking topic would be great. We've seen lots of great weight-saving ideas scattered about; but a central spot to post them would be I think very helpful.

    So what's the point of this long verse......for general lightweight ideas you can't beat BPL. But I'd also love to see a permanent lightweight hammocking topic on HF.

    p.s. I'd LOVE to save a lot of weight by switching to a cuben fiber tarp; but I'm afraid that would make my wallet a little too lightweight!

  4. #24
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,662
    Images
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
    I have joked around about food, but that is an area that I have made the biggest gains. I have been counting my calories each time and readusting for the next trip. I have been averaging 2600 calories per day. If I were to be out more than 2 nights that number starts to go up a little. The last 2 trips i went home with a pack of oreos. For where I hike that is just about the margin of safety needed. If I lose a pound of body fat in the process, I concider that a bonus. About 50% of the time I don't carry a stove which also removes spork, pot, and fuel.
    Dutch, if you have food supply lists you've used to hit your target written up, I'd be really interested to see them . If you add to that post that you shouldn't eat crackers in hammocks, then it would be on topic.

    Also, excellent point about water. I have tended to carry too much of that myself. On my last outing I limited myself to about 1.5 L in my camelback, knowing that resupplies were plentiful. But for most of my hiking I rarely have good data on the reliability of sources marked on the map. Depends so much on how weather has been that year.

    Grizz

  5. #25
    Senior Member GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,662
    Images
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by BurningCedar View Post
    I started off as the traditional ground-dwelling, heavy-duty backpacker. On my trip to Philmont with my son (which started this whole craze for me), my pack weight without food or water was 45 pounds That was for a 10-day mountain trek.
    Been there, done that, and bought the T-shirts.

    Like you, my experience at Philmont pushed me into looking seriously into lighter weight backpacking. I do wonder sometimes how much lighter I could go there, given the weight of the food they supply, and the number of dry camps we had on our trek. There are economies of scale for shared crew equipment, but that doesn't translate to food.

    As we had some pretty small guys on our crew, we larger folks tended to distribute shared gear on an "ability to carry" basis.


    Grizz

  6. #26
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    10,784
    Images
    319
    Just a note to clearify what I said about being more into camping than hiking.
    I was talking about backpacking but I was referring to the question... "do you camp to hike, or hike to camp?"
    In other words, do you make camp just in time to bed down & then get up & start hiking before you eat breakfast?
    Or do you enjoy more time around camp (less miles walked), just relaxing, taking in the quite & beauty, both in the morning & the evening?

    I'm much more into the later category myself<G>.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  7. #27
    Senior Member TeeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY 10'x11'
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,628
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    ... Ed Speer was handing out those blow-up pillow at Trail Days...haven't actually used it yet but I might start carrying it instead of extra clothes in summer. That would be lighter and less volume.
    Is that those pillows that you blow up with a straw??

    If so, I would really like to know how well you like them as a pillow under your head.

    I have some I bought from BPL for almost $3 each before I found that I could get them for less than $0.50 each (in boxes of 50 - hey they're disposable and don't last all that long anyway).

    I stopped using them under my head for 3 reasons:
    1. not stable - my head flopped from side to side, if I blew them up too much. Kind of like resting my head on a soft log. Not enough and my head just sank to the bottom and the pillow ballooned up on each side. I ended up spending too much time getting the air volume "just right". I even tried the dual air chamber types, but that didn't really help. Now for use between my knees, they work a charm, air volume isn't as critical, just enough to keep my knees from rubbing.
    2. noisy - kind of a crinkly noise until they get used a lot. But then, in my use, they spring a leak shortly thereafter and earned their disposable moniker.
    3. I had a habit of losing the straw needed to inflate. The straw isn't absolutely necessary to deflate, but does make it easier. I started carrying an extra straw or 2 or 3.

  8. #28
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    10,784
    Images
    319
    I have to agree w/ you on all 3 reasons Tee Dee. I was able to use it fairly comfortable for my head/neck, but it is just so LOUD<G>.
    But I do like using one between my knees. If it's cold, I'll put it in a stuff sack w/ any extra clothing.
    And yeah, some last longer than others. I went in w/ Dutch & split a box of 50, making them much more economical.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  9. #29
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga
    Hammock
    JRB Bear Mtn. Bridge
    Tarp
    BlackCat/JRB 11x10
    Insulation
    Pad(s)/JRB Quilts
    Posts
    2,424
    Images
    34
    I've got the blow up pillows as well and never liked them as a pillow for the reasons TeeDee mentioned. They do work pretty well between or under the knees when partially inflated.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  10. #30
    Dutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Reinholds, PA
    Hammock
    Bridgeskin
    Tarp
    DIY Blackcat
    Insulation
    DIY Quilts
    Suspension
    Whoopie sling
    Posts
    6,798
    Images
    198
    I really like my blow up pillow. As long as I don't blow it up all the way my head stays on all night. I don't understand the knee problem that you need a pillow between your knees. Is this related to the hammock or do you use a pillow at home in a bed too. I could see 2 taped together for under the knees though. Anyhow I am still using the first one out of the box of 50 that Slowhike and I split. The straw is more durable than I thought. I give them away, but I don't think anyone I gave tham to uses tham regularly. Maybe I am the only one satisfied with it.
    Peace Dutch
    GA>ME 2003


    http://dutchwaregear.com
    Visit Dutchwaregear on facebook (and like it)
    Check us out on Twitter @dutchwaregear

Similar Threads

  1. Do UCRs actually save any weight over whoopies?
    By Bushwhacker in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-18-2014, 22:49
  2. An integrated 'tarp' could save a LOT of weight
    By burtonator in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-09-2013, 15:26
  3. size and weight between gound setup and hangers setup?
    By dammfast in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 12-19-2011, 21:38
  4. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 10-22-2010, 00:17
  5. Will i save a lot of weight with woopies on a WBBB1.7DL
    By DocBurN in forum General Hammock Talk
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-20-2010, 11:38

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •