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Thread: Let's talk cold

  1. #61
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregB View Post
    I live in the Sierra mountains and occasionally go out for snow days. But I really don't know anything about how to properly layer up my clothing and what should be in which layer and so on. The clothing articles on that site are really useful. Thank you for the link.
    Learn up! That's the area that gave me my trailname, thanks to my ancestors and a particularly brutal winter back in 1846/1847.
    Trust nobody!

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    Learn up! That's the area that gave me my trailname, thanks to my ancestors and a particularly brutal winter back in 1846/1847.
    I live just downhill (about 50 miles) from Truckee.

    So, was it your family that had that big party they keep talking about?
    They still have monuments to that "Donner Party" up here.

  3. #63
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregB View Post
    So, was it your family that had that big party they keep talking about?
    Yep, George is right there on the family tree.
    Trust nobody!

  4. #64
    Loki's Avatar
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    Bump!

    This thread taught me about cold weather winter hanging.
    Last winter, for the first season ever; I was hanging during several weekends in below freezing/snowy weather as well as during a couple of weekends with lows in the teens (OK- so not so cold as many).
    What I learned here, and on a few other threads about cold weather, helped me stay warm and dry ;-)

    This winter I am looking forward to snow, cold weather and winter hangs

    Thought our new members could learn by reading through it and our veterans may have some new tips to add to it.

    Hope it helps!

    A couple other helpful Cold weather threads:
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...04-Hypothermia
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...nter-tricks-GO!
    Last edited by Loki; 10-06-2014 at 09:32.
    - Loki,

    "Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.
    Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.
    The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy,
    while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn."
    ó John Muir

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewinder View Post
    I think I posted my winter tips before somewhere but can't find the link. So here they are again...

    Fingers get cold fast and don't work well in freezing temps. Keep em covered as much as possible. The less fiddling you do with knots and line the better. Rig your setup accordingly. Straps and buckles work better and are easier to manipulate with gloves on. Wet whoopies freeze and will not adjust easily. I wear wristies and wool mittens that pull back to transform into fingerless gloves.

    Cold feet are hard to warm up. Get good boots that will keep your feet warm when you are hanging out at camp. It's easy to keep warm when moving but standing around and the feet go cold. I use Baffin boots and bread bags as a vapor barrier. My feet are happy. Down booties are a nice luxury.

    The first few times camp close enough to your car so if it goes wrong you can have a fall back plan. Always have a fall back plan.

    Beware the winter snow scape. What looks snow covered and beautiful may actually be a covering of snow on top of a deep hole or creek. One false step and you fall in (don't ask how I know this)

    Get a big tarp with doors. Use a CRL for ease of setup and adjustment. One that you can pull down close to the ground to block wind and blowing snow. If it is snowing be sure to knock the snow build up off your tarp so it doesn't get overloaded.

    Bring a ccf pad even if you don't plan on using it. It can add warmth if you misjudged the temp. Use it as a sit pad. Worse case you could sleep on the snow in a cave or ditch if things got bad

    Bring a shovel. Lots of use too many to mention.

    Buy a hammock sock. One of the greatest inventions for winter hammocking IMO

    Bring a camp towel. You know one of those microfiber kinds. Good to dry you off if you get wet by falling into wet holes or to rid your hammock of unwanted condensation or snow that gets in your hammock and melts.

    Get a decent pair of snow shoes. Use poles that have a flip lock adjustment. The twist kind can freeze up and fail to adjust.

    Buy/build a pulk. Backpacking in snow is work.

    Get in shape. Everything is harder in winter.


    Last winter my snow hanging trips were close to the car (less then one hour) so I knew I could bail. This year the plan is go further. However without the backup plan of being able to bail out to the car I have decided that I need to haul a storm proven, Hot tent (Seek Outside Backcountry Shelter with Large Ti Stove). Not going to sleep in it, but will use it to warm up and hang out in (meals and such). Also none of my family members will camp in the snow with me unless I bring some assurances. If my hammock set up gets blown out because of a severe storm, I'm going to crawl in this:

    The shelter has been tested by users in 50mph winds and blizzards. (Not my picture)

    First off great thread rival as we approach winter here and the ever present dangers of.
    The above Quoted post catches my attention as yesterday I was oogling the seekoutside.com equipment.
    Having a Plan B or C or D to me is critical when things go sideways and having a second shelter, with heat, besides the hammock is the route I would go once the snow hits even though temps may even be around the freeze point.
    A little extra gear on a pulk is not the end of the world especially if it saves your hide.
    Dealing with condensation for me is a big concern with the hammock and have been trying some stuff even though temps have only touched the freeze point here. A blanket thrown over the ridge line of the hammock seems to help huge....breathable but also holds a little warmth in keeping the dew out, not sure how it will fair once temps drop below freeze...

    And like is seemingly ALWAYS stated on this site TEST TEST TEST. I would backyard yard test for a extended period before ever venturing out as bailing out is not really a option (even though though it may be) hence having a Plan B on site.

    I do look forward to oogling others experiences (already oogled Shug's -40f video a couple of times) in the depths of winter and backyard testing this winter on a small scale to gain some progressive experience
    Life is too Short to not feed the addiction....Hang on and explore the World

  6. #66
    markr6's Avatar
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    I pretty much nailed down my winter backpacking after a few years.

    The one thing that still troubles me are the boots. The first morning they are cold, but warm up on my feet OK. The second or third morning seem to be the problem after they get wet from melting snow. The next morning, they are frozen solid. Way too big to sleep with to keep warm - I'm already doing that with enough gear. I've used hand warmers with some success, but can't rely on them.

    I've been told my best option is a pair with removable liners. Easy to warm up and dry out.

  7. #67
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    markr6 I used to have the same problem until I switched to a pair of pac boots with liners. It is much easier to keep the liners warm at night and with some you can even get extra liners. The downside is that it is harder (at least for me) to find a pair that is comfortable for backpacking long distances. Like all other gear there are huge variations in quality and warmth.

  8. #68
    The Tree Frog's Avatar
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    Subscribed. Thanks all.
    The Pine Barrens Tree frog requires the acidic waters of Atlantic white-cedar swamps and bogs in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. They will typically call from trees standing in or near water, and will return to a hammock in the evening.

  9. #69
    markr6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktitan View Post
    markr6 I used to have the same problem until I switched to a pair of pac boots with liners. It is much easier to keep the liners warm at night and with some you can even get extra liners. The downside is that it is harder (at least for me) to find a pair that is comfortable for backpacking long distances. Like all other gear there are huge variations in quality and warmth.
    Yeah, they all seem to be built for shoveling snow and ice fishing...over-engineered to keep you as warm as possible. Can't have it all I guess. But in the winter I usually only go a few miles at a time so maybe I'll be OK.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roche View Post
    Very timely. I also want to raise the bar by lowering the temps. I've kicked this around with some "oldtimers" as well: ready, aim, fire after you have dialed in your rig by practicing in "bailout friendly" areas. .
    Amen to that. I learned by first testing the insulated clothing that I intended on wearing in a winter hang. Got my mp3 player and a chair and sat outside at night for about an hour when the wind was howling and the temps were in the single digits. When I got my clothing dialed in I later tested my hammock gear setup "at home". Learned a lot from that. Also learned that an external heat source (zippo hand warmer) makes a noticeable difference anytime I got chilled.

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