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  1. #11
    the actual truth is,

    ccf is a vapor barrier, and if you overheat, perspiration can build up because it cannot evaporate through. you can control overheating by adjusting your top insulation. in the jungle this will mean sometimes leaving the top quilt off, or down below the waist until you get cool. this should probably keep you from overheating. if it's too hot just laying on the ccf w/no tq, then just remove the pad altogether, if it's that warm you probably won't need any signifigant bottom insulation anyway.

    it's very possible that if you learn to avoid overheating, you won't have to deal with any excessive wetness isues.

    if you do go for a quilt, you will no longer have a vapor barrier, so perspiration due to overheating can evaporate off. on the negative side, it's no longer windproof, so wind can cut through it. this isn't good in cold weather, so other measures must be taken, such as a larger tarp or some type of undercover.

    many switch to uq's just for the comfort factor many here use pads with success as well.
    Last edited by warbonnetguy; 11-16-2008 at 13:52.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    WBG - what you say is basically true, but right now I'm sitting in a vinyl desk chair in a hotel. I'm not even close to overheated and every single time I get up I feel damp. Every time I'm in it for more than a few minutes, at least. I can feel my shorts and shirt drying out when I stand up, and it actually chills me a bit b/c it's cool enough in my room.

    Some folks just have a different comfort level when it comes to laying or sitting on something that's non-breathable.

    Kinda like the old naugahide chairs and such...even w/o a blanket they're still sticky.
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  3. #13
    i think covering it with ripstop helps alot with that feeling and wearing some sort of lightweight base layer would probably help even more. light wetness isn't necessairly a reason not to use pads though, especially if you can't afford an uq. i like ccf over inflateables.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Certainly agree - like I said, people just have different levels of what feels acceptable to them. I think I tend to sweat more than other people on CCF pads...that's why they're not comfortable to me. But plenty of people are fine with it...as long as it works for them I wouldn't encourage them to do anything differently. Wish it worked for me, even!!

    What I don't understand though is why I sweat on CCF and Thermarests even when I'm nowhere near overheating, but I don't sweat on my Downmat even when I'm a little bit warm and have to vent.

    But I don't want to derail the thread...I don't think a Downmat will be needed in the jungle. I doubt even a thin CCF would be needed. I'd probably bring something like the Weathershield just to create some dead air space and block the wind. Worst-case you could stick jackets or something in there. That would take care of the bugs, too.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  5. #15
    Senior Member 6 feet over's Avatar
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    To protect from biting bugs from below, some guys have made a hammock sock. I'd guess you could easily make one from mesh that would keep biting bugs from having easy access to your back. You could then sleep directly on the hammock's breathable bottom fabric without bugs getting to your back.

    I haven't used a sock myself, but if you use the search tool you can find prior threads on this topic.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6 feet over View Post
    I haven't used a sock myself, but if you use the search tool you can find prior threads on this topic.
    There's a whole section about hammock socks here.
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  7. #17
    maybe, it might get cool enough for a thin pad though, the 1/8" torso length would be plenty warm for sure, and pretty minimal weight/bulk as well as far as actual bottom insulation goes. if you're taking a sit pad, which i would in the jungle, might as well take one big enough to use as bottom insulation. another possible option might be something like a neat sheet or even a fleece blanket. laying directly on a blanket is probably just as much of a pita as a pad is though.

    an undercover alone would probably only give you 10 degrees maybe? that might be enough. has anyone checked nightime temps for the area. elevation might factor in too.

  8. #18
    Senior Member te-wa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    has anyone checked nightime temps for the area. elevation might factor in too.
    I checked yesterday... curiosity. temps for NE Peru are showing 72° for a low. i believe it is sort of an "early Summer" s. of the Equator right now, and very humid all year. I'd use Permethrin, as suggested earlier.
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  9. #19
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    One possibility for underneath protection from mosquitoes is a Dri Ducks poncho.

    You might need a poncho or rain gear anyway. The Dri Ducks poncho will protect the bottom of the hammock from mosquitoes and is breathable so that sweat shouldn't be a problem. Also, if the wind/breeze picks and the temperature does drop enough to need "some" slight insulation underneath, the poncho would help and my be enough. Not much maybe, but you probably wouldn't need much. I have found that by simply folding the hood over the hood draw cord and cinching the draw cord down tight, it closes it off to entry by any mosquitoes.

    All you need to do is rig up a means of hanging the poncho underneath the hammock and snugged close.

  10. #20
    New Member mgabel_pi's Avatar
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    Well, I'm most concerned about overheating and sweating, but I'd like to prepare for the possibility of a cool night, even though it's likely to be very hot and very muggy. mikeeinfhaz points out that NE Peru (where, in fact, I'll be:-- 3°15'57.67"S 72°54'10.84"W) is close (like 250 miles) to the equator.

    As NEST said:

    Even breathable hammocks get kinda sticky against my skin in high humidity and heat. I would just put something between me and the hammock, like a thin blanket. That get's me down to the mid-60s easily.

    But, if a blanket gets wet in the jungle, it can talk a long time to dry.

    Just got this e-mail from GG:

    Howdy Michael,
    The 1/8 tends to wad up a bit which is why we make the 1/4" wide, so it will
    stay put and you can trim it to fit. I'm not a hammock camper but we make
    them at their request.

    I think it might get clammy if you were sweating on it, I haven't tried
    though. It doesn't absorb water so maybe clammy although it is quite soft.

    Hope that helps,
    Happy Trails,
    Grant

    So, where I am right now is that Permethrin should solve the mosquito problem, and that a ccf pad will be too hot (and the 1/8" uncomfortable and the 1/4" too big/heavy), even if inside a silk liner or a ripstop casing - UNLESS, maybe, it's textured, or baffled. I seem to recall I've seen some like that.

    That feature could, it seems to me, provide some air circulation and also some warmth if/when needed.

    warbonnetguy: Your point about a sit-pad is a good one. I usually carry a 3 foot square of silnylon for this purpose.

    Also, I do like your idea of something like a neat sheet, as I think about this more as I am writing. It's breathable and yet does not hold water. The standard size (57"x77") is too large (it weighs a pound, btw) but it can be cut without fraying, according to the FAQ section of the website. There are apparently 5 washer weights (corners and center) that I would guess could be removed without a problem. So, the neat sheet is where I'm heading, mentally, right now. And, just thinking, if I don't cut it down, maybe it could be both an UQ and a TQ, when folded around me and then just an UQ or at TQ when folded in half IF it's soft enough.

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