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  1. #1
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    side/edge seal on UQs- how important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Youngblood View Post
    If you assume all things are equal and all the design issues are resolved, then there are 2 sides to this. A truly insulated hammock isn't capable of being vented during times where you might want to do that... but it won't vent on you during times where you don't want it to do that. There are no issues of sealing it around the edges.
    Now that brings up an additional question. What about being sealed on the sides? How much of a factor is that?

    The reason I am asking is because of my use and theories of the pod approach. I quickly became of the OPINION ( based on no actual evidence) that one reason why my PeaPod seemed to work so good- so darn easy to stay warm with almost zero learning curve- was because the edges were sealed with the bag overlapping the hammock edges as the pod closed in the center top. It seemed to me that this 100% eliminated cold air sinking down along the edges and, if any gap at all existed, getting under your back. Plus it was pretty well sealed on the ends. Thus the result was, if completely closed up or mostly closed up with a top quilt, about like being sealed in a mummy bag. Or, even if not closed at all, the edges were still sealed.

    While using my SS or UQs, sealing along the ends or sides can present various challenges, depending in part upon which system is being used with which hammock. ( EDIT: and though this can usually be worked out by correct adjustment, things might still change if you shift position too much during the night, like going from back to side or from left side to right side, etc) The issue of "closing the windows" on the ends is well discussed( or opening them for ventilation when warm), but how much of a factor, if any, is sealing along the sides/edges?
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 01-05-2009 at 10:26.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  2. #2
    Senior Member whitefoot_hp's Avatar
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    i think you are on to something. eliminating the gap between side edge of hammock and underquilt seems worthy of consideration to me. its a no brainer.

    i have 50 degree prototype peapod. with my big agnes pad and golite top quilt i am a warm SO? at night.

    it is very easy to stay warm. very easy to bundle up.

  3. #3
    Member I Splice's Avatar
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    I use a Peapod and one issue I've had with it is getting the Velcro sealed along the top. I often seem to have small gaps where it doesn't seal and the cold comes in. I think it would be warmer if one strip of Velcro was 2 or 3 inches from the edge so that there would be some overlap

  4. #4
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by I Splice View Post
    I use a Peapod and one issue I've had with it is getting the Velcro sealed along the top. I often seem to have small gaps where it doesn't seal and the cold comes in. I think it would be warmer if one strip of Velcro was 2 or 3 inches from the edge so that there would be some overlap
    Yes, that can be an issue, though I usually always end up managing to keep it all closed. I usually have to pull it real tight up towards my chin and get a b it of Velcro attached up there, then by reaching down and /or using my feet I manage to get the rest closed pretty good. It is a bit of extra work, but I got more proficient and quicker with practice. The up side is that, compared to a zipper, getting out is super easy.

    Another issue is that if I move too much, especially if I am not almost completely closed, things can open up- related to how quick and easy it is to get out. But usually, once I am settled in, it stays closed. That over lap idea is a good one. I have also thought that a snap or two along the Velcro, or some lines for tieing closed at a couple of places about knee level, would greatly aide staying closed. For one thing, you could have most of the pod closed before you get in, just enough open to sit down and get your feet in. Usually the stress of getting in will just cause it to open back up, as it is now. I have thought about adding something like this but I have not bothered yet. Because as it is, it still always has managed to keep me warm.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Using the JRB Mt Washington under quilt at temps below freezing in the Blackbird I always end up with frost/ice forming at the foot end edges on the side. Figured it was my body warm moist air escaping then condensing on the cold outer surface of the quilt. How much coming through the quilt vs. leaking at the edges is a guess. But if the majority of the warm moist air is leaking at the edges I'm not maximizing the quilts insulation potential. Sewed some Omnitape to the foot edge of the quilt. Need to sew some tape to the BB. Will see this late winter/early spring if it reduces or eliminates the frosting. Worse case I now have a footboxed quilt if I have no choice but going to ground.
    Noel V.

  6. #6
    it probably also depends on how deep any looseness goes, if it's from the edge down an inch or 2 and then the uq makes contact below that point, it's not going to make much difference, but if the "gap" goes down to where your body parts are then you would be letting heat escape.

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