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    Senior Member Doctari's Avatar
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    Hypothermia

    I couldn't figure out where to put this, but as it is / was group trip related.
    On the MRHO trip report thread Slow hike said:

    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    Doctari, I'm just glad you guys got out safe. But your adventure can be a learning experience for the rest of us.
    It makes me wonder about things like, what kind of rain gear were you wearing & what caused you to get so wet during that hike.
    Don't get me wrong. I know how much of a challenge it can be hiking in the rain. I'm just wondering what advice you guys would give someone that might find themselves hiking in those conditions.

    A few possibilities that come to mind are... hiking slower to prevent overheating as well as ventilating rain gear & removing layers.
    Removing layers is easyier said than done when it's raining though.
    So, my "lesson learned" post:

    ME: Gortex (O.R. gear) rain coat that had kept me dry many times before, Washed ONLY in clear water, never any soap. No bug stuff on it, etc. I got soaked through.
    Rain pants, their first time in rain (were used as just cold weather pants for past 8 years) Yea, got soaked legs.
    Under that all was my regular hiking clothing for the temps encountered, only "Issue" my pants under the rain pants were cotton, didn't count on getting that wet. Everything else was nylon or Poly, my socks were wool.

    I feel we didn't push very hard, stayed cool, etc. Took a few standing breaks as we were mostly in the open till just before the Wise shelter. I for one ate little, even at the Wise. Which was one thing that set off alarms for me, I was NOT hungry. Warning #2: I didn't have the energy to look far in my food bag, way to tired to get food out. Food I wasn't hungry for, but knew I seriously needed! Then I took a close look at my 3 companions, as stated in a previous post, I looked at them as a mirror to me; I felt GREAT, was still having fun, could see in my 3 mirrors that I was in sad shape. So I forced down some tiny candy bars & a bit of jerky & we bailed!
    Our "Plan #2" was to set up in the shelter would have likely been a good plan IF we didn't have someone for sure at the group campground, not comfortable, but all 4 of us in drier clothing & after eating, the shelter MAY have provided enough shelter, especially with the front covered by our tarps.
    I think, for me at least, having the #2 plan, made the decision to bail easier. I don't know why, but it did.

    Should we have stayed? No way of knowing. I think not. IF we could have built a fire, that would undoubtedly been the thing to do. But at the group campground, with a lot of fire starting alcohol, 3 Trioxine tabs & 1/4 of a Duraflame log & several people trying, they could not get a lasting fire started.

    The toughest one in the group, less body mass (OK, Fat LOL) was Chickadee. I think she managed to stay drier than the rest of us, but had less natural insulation.

    What I wish we had done different? Not sure. Maybe not hike in the rain. But I have hiked in cold rain before & for me to not hike,,,, well, not going to happen.
    Set up camp sooner? We discussed that Monday, our first spot to camp was a bit over 1/2 mile from the shelter, we don't think that would have made any difference.
    Turn back? Sure,, When? We were fine while moving, or at least felt we were.
    Eat more? Yep, should have, but with that rain, I for one didn't feel like stopping & opening my pack. A lesson I did take away, I had issues finding my snacks that were in the bottom of my food bag. I now have a small Teal colored (My food bag is Orange) bag that will be attached to the food bag to stay near the top for ease of finding. This little bag will hold 5 days of snacks easily & is easy to see in the food bag.
    Last edited by Doctari; 01-24-2013 at 12:49.
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

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