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  1. #31
    I Learn So Others Can Too FireInMyBones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunner76 View Post
    Some of the stuff might get lost in that oversized pack ...
    If he does end up going across the country , since several areas require a bear can, he wanted a pack that would handle one easily.
    -Jeremy "Brother Bones" Owner of Bonefire™ Gear

    "If anyone speaks, he should do it as one speaking the very words of God. If anyone serves, he should do it with the strength God provides, so that in all things God may be praised through Jesus Christ. To him be the glory and the power for ever and ever. Amen." 1 Peter 4:11

    Quote Originally Posted by FLRider View Post
    FireInMyBones; he's a mountain goat crossed with a marathoner.
    My YouTube
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  2. #32
    New Member Grampy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunner76 View Post
    Some of the stuff might get lost in that oversized pack

    Going as lite as possible allows you to enjoy the hike. Just don't go so lite you are not prepared for the conditions you will be hiking / camping in.

    Lots of good info here and on Whiteblaze on how to reduce your pack weight.

    As suggested, get a scale that weighs in grams and ounces. One that weighs up to 5 pounds is big enough. Make a spreadsheet and weigh everything you plan on taking and then take a hard cold look at the spreadsheet. If you are packing something that weighs more than that (other than food and or water) its too heavy and you need to look for a lighter weight solution.
    Being unprepared is one of my concerns. I expect to downgrade much en route, and I thank you all for helping me consider much prior to my onset.

    I have tried the Whiteblaze. My discharge is in 11 days; and the Army firewall prevents my access to it. I shall check it out soon, though; unless there are some excerpts you think I should see immediately, please cut and paste. I apologize if that would create unnecessary work for you.

  3. #33
    New Member Grampy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireInMyBones View Post
    If he does end up going across the country , since several areas require a bear can, he wanted a pack that would handle one easily.
    The bear-proof whatsit would also be a good place for prescriptions, I think. Last thing I need is an animal getting into that while I'm far from the nearest VA hospital.

  4. #34
    New Member Grampy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bear bag hanger View Post
    You asked for advice, so here it is. Understand that what is important to me may not be important to you, etc. Anyway, I see way too much redundancy in this list. You don't need both a notepad and a logbook. Choose one. Discard the hatchet and pick the knife or multi-tool. Better, discard all three and find a lightweight folding knife with about a two and a half in blade. Discard the sharpening stone - you can borrow one a various stops if you really need it. You list "compass & asthmas" and a "button compass". Pick one. You don't need two compasses. Emergency crank radio - too heavy, just get a small radio that meets your needs. You list two books and the bible. This might be a good time to see if a Kindle (the one's without the back light) and see if you can download your book choices to it. The battery life on those are about two to three weeks. You'll need a padded case for it, but it will still weigh less than one book. I know you can download the bible to it, pretty sure you can find a downloadable guide to edible plants. Not sure you really need the US Army Survival, Evasion and Recovery book. We promise not to shoot you if we see you on the trail!
    Whah, you guys are tough! But good advice is always tough, I suppose.

    I appreciate the promise, but what about off the trail?

  5. #35
    New Member Grampy's Avatar
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    What about hygiene and poo disposal? I suspect the hippies would not appreciate a gas burn, and I don't want to carry the stuff...

  6. #36
    grannypat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grampy View Post
    What about hygiene and poo disposal? I suspect the hippies would not appreciate a gas burn, and I don't want to carry the stuff...
    Fireinmybones did a great video called "How to Deal with C**p in the Woods" using leave no trace principles: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...ad.php?t=52718
    Keep movin', keep believing and enjoy the journey!

  7. #37
    old4hats's Avatar
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    If you have never been on the AT or other long trails, then it is easy to think that you need a lot of maps and such. Not the case. The AT is white blazed to death, before long you will probably find yourself wishing for a bit more of a challenge, direction wise. There may be a few isolated areas where you get to think about which way to go,but not many. Compasses and maps will find most use if/when you need to go off the trail to a mail drop or such, and even then you will likely find another hiker who will know or else is heading you way. Some good study and note taking pre-hike should help with locating water sources, again, ask another hiker if you need to.
    A wood burner stove is great, just don't get in a hurry. An alcohol back up stove with a few ounces of alcohol can be a really wonderful extra. You have the ear of a good trail man in Fireinmybones, listen to his council, read a lot, weigh everything. Before taking off for any long duration, try to take a two or three day hike just to test and validate your gear, real time use has a way of showing things we have missed. Thanks for serving this country, I hope you have a really great time on the trails.

  8. #38
    New Member Grampy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by old4hats View Post
    You have the ear of a good trail man in Fireinmybones, listen to his council, read a lot, weigh everything. Before taking off for any long duration, try to take a two or three day hike just to test and validate your gear, real time use has a way of showing things we have missed. Thanks for serving this country, I hope you have a really great time on the trails.
    I think you are correct. I shall make every effort to test my gear on Memorial Weekend.

  9. #39
    New Member Grampy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grannypat View Post
    Fireinmybones did a great video called "How to Deal with C**p in the Woods" using leave no trace principles: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...ad.php?t=52718
    That is a good video. I learned a lot.
    Last edited by Grampy; 05-13-2013 at 21:55.

  10. #40
    Detail Man's Avatar
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    Welcome to HF, Grampy. FIMB said to look for you.

    +1 on Andrew Skurka's book. I was just looking at a copy this past week. Being new to backpacking , you might find it to be helpful. In it he covers all the bases of backpacking. Andrew has made a name for himself by hiking long distances, so he understands lightweight, but more so taking what you will need for a given area and season. That's the point I would emphasize as you prepare for the AT.

    Talk to other thru-hikers. Keep in mind that everyone does his/her own thing -- HYOH (hike your own hike/hang our own hammock), but I have learned lots from others who have thrued.

    For your gear list:

    You shouldn't need both of these. The new maps should contain the same info, but the book will have more detail.

    Pocket Profile AT maps – antigravitygear
    2013 Southbound: The AT Guide, David Miller

    A button compass is plenty for the AT. The trail is obvious.

    BDUs are heavy and contain cotton. I'd suggest a synthetic something more suitable for hiking, especially in the rain.

    I wish you well on your journey.

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