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  1. #1
    Senior Member SteelToe's Avatar
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    Durability and Maintanence of Noseeum Netting

    I'm about finished with my bug net project, but I am finding it would be a lot easier to attach it permanently than with removable hardware. I wouldn't necessarily mind having the net attached always, but I'm worried it would get snagged and torn up with use, and wear out far sooner than the hammock attached to it.

    Does anyone have any tips for maintaining noseeum? Obviously large tears would need a patch-job, but I'm more curious how people handle the inevitable "pin hole" tears that happen when something snags it. How well does the netting hold up to "prudent" usage (i.e. not dragging it on the ground or over branches, but general packing/unpacking/usage wear)?

    TCB
    "We sit together, the mountain and I, until only the mountain remains."
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  2. #2
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    What Clark does

    Does not address your failure mode -- small tears from snagging -- but, I'll bet the Clark Outdoors practice of putting what look like felled seams in their unseamed noseum bug netting is done to create strong lines to absorb and distribute loads which would tear the fabric if concentrated in small areas.

    Example: http://junglehammock.com/product/tro...ungle-hammock/

    "What look like felled seams" because I think that Clark just folds the fabric back over itself three or five times to form 8mm wide netting-wide strips which are then stitched through to give a seam-like appearance.

    I may be mistaken if some reinforcement such as polyester grosgrain is included in those "seams". But, the purpose would be the same: to increase durability
    Last edited by DemostiX; 06-23-2013 at 01:05.

  3. #3
    Senior Member SteelToe's Avatar
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    That's true, this netting will tear if the slightest bit of load gets concentrated through it. An el cheapo hammock with bug net and zippered side fly ripped along the entire left side almost immediately when I hung it without just the right amount of ridgeline tension. I learned quickly why the original ridgeline was elastic, and why simply replacing it with paracord so it could carry a tarp was bad idea

    My current bugnet project required quite a bit of tailoring with pins, and I've already got a couple "imperfections" about 2mm across where a tad too much load was applied while I was messing with it. It's no big deal, it's not like I'm looking for a hermetic bug-proof chamber or anything, but it got me thinking about long-term durability prospects.

    If the net will look like hell and not protect against skeeters anymore after, say, 50 set up/tear downs, I wouldn't want to make it a permanent part of my DIY hammock that I expect to last longer. I suppose I could always cut it off and do-over later if it got bad, but I'm just trying to think ahead and save myself trouble.

    In any case, this thing's gonna get soaked in Permethrine before I do field testing, so it's probably a moot point as far as bug repellency is concerned.

    TCB
    "We sit together, the mountain and I, until only the mountain remains."
    -Li Po

  4. #4
    Senior Member gargoyle's Avatar
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    Good netting is strong and durable.
    Many a folk have flipped accidentally and been trapped in their hammock. Or used a netted hammock 10+ years.

    Not all netting is created equal. If your diy netting is fragile, treat it gingerly. (sounds like tulle, to me?) Some cheap netting or tulle is fine for prototyping. But cheap netting is cheap netting. My first diy bugnet was some inexpensive tulle. It worked..for a while. But after a few exposures to UV, it became crispy and basically disintegrated, Lesson learned. Did I really "save" any money? NO. But I did learn how that project was going to work for a few dollars and my time, so not a total loss.

    I now give the fabrics a test at the store. Pinch, pull, stretch, to see if this fabric is what I need? Feel it, is it what I want? Visually inspect it for a few feet to check for imperfections? Check on its treatments or coatings (if available). Will it perform the way I intend it? If the fabric fails that test, I move on. Cost is relative. Sure I want to save $, but the end result is if I spend two hours or two days making an item and the fabric is junk, its my fault.

    If your buying fabric from a vendor on the web, it becomes more difficult (impossible) to test. Some vendors know their products, and its performance. Some don't. Buy from a trusted vendor.

    Fixing tears.
    Some repairs can be done in field with a quick stitch across the rip. Carry a needle and several yards of decent thread in your kit.

    In the field, a tape job can prevent further ripping or seal out the bugs. Tape isn't ideal, since it can leave sticky residue, but it can make a night more comfortable. Press a layer of tape on one side of the fabric, covering the rip. Repeat for other side. Press firmly on a flat surface to secure the tapes to fabric.

    Some require a patch. Save some scraps from this project for future repairs at home.

  5. #5
    Senior Member SteelToe's Avatar
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    Nah, it's the good stuff from BWDD, but it's obviously not as tough as the fabric the hammock is made from. By "slightest load" I really meant about 5lbs or so applied to a needle It has definitely been stronger than I'd expected, and tougher than most netting I've messed with before (cheap mosquito netting, as opposed to noseeum).

    Sounds like patching is the way to go. I don't have any rips (yet ) big enough to justify such measures, but I'll be sure to keep some scraps left over for inevitable patches.

    Many a folk have flipped accidentally and been trapped in their hammock
    Man, that's awful! I'm slightly claustrophobic in certain hammocks as it is; that has to be horrible . I think I found a slightly-less-than-goofy way to attach the net to be removable using plastic button snaps (they weigh nothing, are fairly tough Nylon, and have been surprisingly tough little guys so far) so I'll pursue that option for now. If I flip in my hammock, ain't no way those little things will slow my descent one bit!

    TCB
    "We sit together, the mountain and I, until only the mountain remains."
    -Li Po

  6. #6
    Senior Member scottpash's Avatar
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    I made my Fronkey style net using polyester ikea curtains they are or seem to be very durable and I think should hold up well in UV light

    Just made the net 3 weeks ago and only had it out 4 days so far

    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/pr...192/#/50145430
    "HANGING OUT" has taken on a whole NEW MEANING

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