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Thread: Thread Injector

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    XTrekker's Avatar
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    Thread Injector

    So I have done lots of shopping around and I think I have finally settled on this sewing machine. It has lots of great reviews but wanted to put it past yall Fabric Welding experts before I pull the trigger.

    SINGER 9960 Quantum Stylist 600-Stitch Computerized Sewing Machine


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    Wow, looks pretty fancy. What are you planning on doing with it? Do you need all the features?

    I bought an old used machine because it was all metal and mechanical inside. I figured it would last longer and be easier to maintain. The guy at the store where I bought it said he preferred Janome machines over Singer and a lot of the newer machines were not as durable as older ones due to more plastic parts used nowadays. I'm still a newbie to thread injecting but this is what little I have gleaned so far. Hopefully those with more experience will post.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    A 600 stitch sewing machine is mostly squeal and very little pig. Lots of fancy stitches which are never going to be used by even the most devoted Grandma. Those stitches come at a price, usually the reduction of quality in the fundamental workings of the machine. It's all electronic, which means if any thing ever goes wrong you will not be able to fix it yourself. Entire circuit boards will have to be replaces, if you can still get them. A five year warrenty on electronics is in my view a minimal warranty considering that virtually every thing in the machine is controlled by the electronics. Twenty five year warranty on the aluminum chassis is truly a worthless selling point. The chassis should last for at least three times that long if well maintained. That can not be said for the electronics.

    Heat will be a major problem with this machine. It can damage electronics very quickly and unpredictably. The motor is DC which is not a bad thing, but there is no indication of its power. If you are going to be making gear, I think you would be better off with a less electronic older machine. If you are going to be doing more advanced sewing I think you would be better off at a local/regional sewing machine shop where you can actually use the machine in person and likely get some lessons thrown in for free.

    Probably not what you wanted to hear. But my take on it, none the less. Too fancy to be durable, too cheap to be really good.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

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    What RamblinRev said!!

    I've sewn for more years than I want to admit to, both professionally and for myself and I've never used anywhere near 600 stitches. Think of it like the newer cars with all kinds of computerized fancy stuff - it breaks, you can't fix it and it has to go to the dealer cause even your local mechanic doesn't have the technical knowhow or equipment to repair it.

    The older machines are popular with us for a reason!

    Save your money for more fabric, go looking for an older machine made when they were built to last. Mine's almost as old as I am, made with all steel gears, no plastic anywhere and it will still be running strong long after I'm long gone from this earth.

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    XTrekker's Avatar
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    Re: Thread Injector

    I have an older machine right now. brand name Montgomery Ward. I think it's 30 years old. its almost driven me completely mad. the only sewing machine shop in my area is a Joanns fabric that I know of and the people behind the counter there have no idea what I'm talking about every time I go in there to ask them a question. nor do they seem interested in helping me anyways.

    I could look around and try to find an old singer and then look around and find somebody to repair it.
    it's a tough call not sure which way to go.
    a lot of the features on this machine I really like. like the self threading system, the built in thread cutter, plus all the feet it comes with. it has a lot of great reviews. I'll have to think about it for a while.
    thanks for any input

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    Senior Member WickedKlown2's Avatar
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    XTrekker,

    Most Vacuum Cleaner repair places also work on sewing machines. The only place around me besides JoAnn's is a Vacuum Repair Shop. You might be surprised what you find there
    Dave aka WK2
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    Any models out there with less bells and whistles yet still have features you like? It's tough if there are no shops/mechanics near you. What is it about the machine you have that gives you grief?
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

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    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XTrekker View Post
    I have an older machine right now. brand name Montgomery Ward. I think it's 30 years old. its almost driven me completely mad.
    a lot of the features on this machine I really like. like the self threading system, the built in thread cutter, plus all the feet it comes with. it has a lot of great reviews. I'll have to think about it for a while.
    thanks for any input
    Monkey Wards sold rebranded machines. The actual manufacturer varied by who gave them the best deal that particular model year. What is driving you mad? That's a crucial question. Is it something that can be fixed or is it something you haven't mastered yet?

    The features you list as being desirable are understandable, but IMO return you to the squeal instead of the pig. Autothreading means that you run the thread through slots. It's a nice feature for people who don't want to learn how to properly thread the machine. But it really adds nothing to the practical aspects of functionality. Autoneedle threading is a feature I absolutely hate. It gives me no benefit and lasts long enough to be annoying. Typically there is a little wire hook that goes through the needle eye. You swing it forward, catch the thread, swing it back and it pulls the thread through the needle. Sounds cool, but infact to me it is a pita. You have to have the needle in just the right place to line up, which is really futzy to me. The hook bends and you are back to thread by hand any way.

    All the feet are a selling point only if you will use them. "Stitch in the Ditch" foot is a foot with a guide built into it. It still relies on the operator to feed the fabric smoothly and cleanly. For garments it can be useful. For gear... IMO not so much. You don't stitch in the ditch much even on quilts and tarps.

    Many of the other feet are designed to use with the 585 stitches you will never ever use and won't look good anyway. This is an attempt at a cheap embroidery machine. Operative word is cheap. Embroidery machines run well in excess of $1000 for quality. The cheapy ones are like comparing ASCII art to good graphics. They just don't cut it.

    I'm sorry to rain on your parade. I know the attraction of a bright new shiny toy. I love new toys. But good reviews by people who may not know what makes a good machine do not mean a quality product. And the machine might be great for a few years. But you may end up having a 25 pound paperweight in six years because of crappy circuit boards soldered by machine, or worse yet, untrained monkeys. So here's the deal... You asked. That's my opinion. But it is just that. Take for what you think it is worth. If it turns out to be a good deal we will all be happy for you. If it turns out to be a poor choice no one is going to come back with an "I told you so." We just don't work that way around here.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  9. #9
    Senior Member wirerat123's Avatar
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    Vintage Iron is the way to go for a hammock making machine. All metal, and last forever. A 1950s or earlier good quality machine in good working order will still be making hammocks and such long after a moder machine has cost hundreds of dollars to maintain and will have all the stitching features you'd ever need.

    Plus there will be a time when you can pass it down to your kids. OIld machines never die, they just freeze up from lack of love. Find a well maintained older machine, show it love and it'll treat you right.
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  10. #10
    XTrekker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Monkey Wards sold rebranded machines. The actual manufacturer varied by who gave them the best deal that particular model year. What is driving you mad? That's a crucial question. Is it something that can be fixed or is it something you haven't mastered yet?

    The features you list as being desirable are understandable, but IMO return you to the squeal instead of the pig. Autothreading means that you run the thread through slots. It's a nice feature for people who don't want to learn how to properly thread the machine. But it really adds nothing to the practical aspects of functionality. Autoneedle threading is a feature I absolutely hate. It gives me no benefit and lasts long enough to be annoying. Typically there is a little wire hook that goes through the needle eye. You swing it forward, catch the thread, swing it back and it pulls the thread through the needle. Sounds cool, but infact to me it is a pita. You have to have the needle in just the right place to line up, which is really futzy to me. The hook bends and you are back to thread by hand any way.

    All the feet are a selling point only if you will use them. "Stitch in the Ditch" foot is a foot with a guide built into it. It still relies on the operator to feed the fabric smoothly and cleanly. For garments it can be useful. For gear... IMO not so much. You don't stitch in the ditch much even on quilts and tarps.

    Many of the other feet are designed to use with the 585 stitches you will never ever use and won't look good anyway. This is an attempt at a cheap embroidery machine. Operative word is cheap. Embroidery machines run well in excess of $1000 for quality. The cheapy ones are like comparing ASCII art to good graphics. They just don't cut it.

    I'm sorry to rain on your parade. I know the attraction of a bright new shiny toy. I love new toys. But good reviews by people who may not know what makes a good machine do not mean a quality product. And the machine might be great for a few years. But you may end up having a 25 pound paperweight in six years because of crappy circuit boards soldered by machine, or worse yet, untrained monkeys. So here's the deal... You asked. That's my opinion. But it is just that. Take for what you think it is worth. If it turns out to be a good deal we will all be happy for you. If it turns out to be a poor choice no one is going to come back with an "I told you so." We just don't work that way around here.

    No your fine, rain on the parade all you want..I'd rather not make a $330+ mistake. I am really grateful for your in-depth feedback. Your right, reviews are not always accurate and often are by people who dont know any better anyway. Although there were alot of features that sounded really nice, the 600 stitches really wasn't what attracted me. I was hoping that $330 would buy me a half decent new machine that would stitch through thick material accurately and that it could actually feed material through it without the needle jamming up in the bobbin cradle(not sure the correct name). And never seeing another birds-nest again would be awesome too.

    Perhaps ill give old machines another try and look around. On Craigslist, I see hundreds of old machines but have no idea where to start as far as what is good and what is not worth my time. Any pointers? Name brands and Models to look out for?

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