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  1. #11
    dakotaross's Avatar
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    Sorry, was taking too long with getting my words right and trying to work at the same time and missed your post that it was a 20 UQ.
    "haamoocker" - its my Ikea name

  2. #12
    dakotaross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainhanger View Post
    yes it was a 20* full length underquilt..please do explain, as it seems to me that is my hardest area to tweak in..thanks
    First of all, it could very well be that you had everything just fine and that you transferred so much heat, that the normally breathable UQP got stopped up with condensed vapor and stopped breathing. I think this what you were suggesting.

    However, its hard for me to imagine that being the case in the 30s. I think what might be more likely is that not enough heat was being pulled through the UQ, so that the relatively mild heat that did come through mixed with the micro-climate created by the UQP - an environment created by having the UQP close, but not close enough to affect loft which leaves tiny spaces of air in between.

    If the UQ is not getting much heat from you because you have insulating clothes on that trap the heat so its not getting into the UQ efficiently, then what you have is mildly warm air that surrounds you in the inner layer of down of the UQ (because that's all it took to keep you warm), but then you get an UQ that isn't fully filling the entire loft with hot air. Warm air gets pulled through the down and the exterior of the UQ as it is tries to find the cold air, but not with enough gusto to evaporate the heavy moisture-laden air in the micro-climates created by the space between the UQ and UQP.

    The other factor is the "breathability" of the UQP. You know how Goretex really only works in dry climates where the moisture can be pulled through the material by the difference between the moist and dry air? Perhaps the ripstop failed to be "breathable" in such moist air, too.

    You should expect your 20 UQ to keep you warm enough in those temps that you have to vent on top. If that's not the case, there's a good chance its not efficiently getting your body heat.
    "haamoocker" - its my Ikea name

  3. #13
    SnrMoment's Avatar
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    Dewpoint.

    This will go a long way toward explaining it all.
    Love is blind. Marriage is an eye opener.

  4. #14
    King Dork brooklynkayak's Avatar
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    Re: "Dewpoint."

    Yes, every solid object exposed to 100% humidity will be wet.
    The inside of you fluffy layers were probably warm enough to be just above 100%, while the outer part of you UQ/UQP were at a temperature low enough to reach 100%(dewpoint).

    I remember a 10 day trip I did where it was always near 100% humidity at night and very little sunlight and lots of rain during the day.
    Everything I had was perpetually damp. It never got dangerously cold, but my skin was like a raisin.

    I did enjoy that trip by the way.

  5. #15
    mountainhanger's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone. I was a little worried but did. Do a little venting and adjusting of uqp and kept my clothes to a minimum and while still was wet was a lot better
    It's not the boulders that throw us off balance, it's the pebbles beneath our feet

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