View Poll Results: I'd recommend

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  • Incubator 40

    0 0%
  • Incubator 40+2oz

    6 7.50%
  • Incubator 20

    65 81.25%
  • Other option listed in comments

    9 11.25%
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  1. #11
    mr hvac's Avatar
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    Researching under quilts

    If I was to buy an under quilt that goes to zero degrees. Could I vent it when it warmed up to around 50 degrees and remain comfortable ? IF i get a little cold when I'm trying to sleep I will be up all night. And could I remove my top quilt to cool down a little?. Is this a practical way of thinking? I'm just afraid if I don't get the warmest UQ I will regret it. So I figured I could adjust it to fit the need . Any and all feed back is appreciated.

  2. #12
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    I appreciate for the feedback and poll votes, I understand the logic on going with the 20 degree to suffice for the coldest planned scenarios, and am now leaning that way. Someone also mentioned getting one that would allow me to hang now, which I like; sooner the better.

    I have a similar concern as mrhvac

    Quote Originally Posted by mr hvac View Post
    If I was to buy an under quilt that goes to zero degrees. Could I vent it when it warmed up to around 50 degrees and remain comfortable? IF i get a little cold when I'm trying to sleep I will be up all night. And could I remove my top quilt to cool down a little?. Is this a practical way of thinking? I'm just afraid if I don't get the warmest UQ I will regret it. So I figured I could adjust it to fit the need . Any and all feed back is appreciated.
    I am curious what the protocol is with a 20 degree UQ and a summer camp. At 5000ft elevation in June here, average temps are 60. I know some form of UQ will still be required for me to personally sleep warm, as some people require them indoors in their homes.

    In 60 degree weather does that make a 20 degree UQ obsolete (just too hot) in that situation, or can I simply sling it a little looser and not have to worry nearly as much about my TQ? I'll be hitting the land to test all of this, but still a few days out from receiving my gear and interested in your opinions regarding warmer camps.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fish<>< View Post
    Is there any reson in particular that you must go with down for an underquilt? If you will be seeing a minimum of about 20, why not look at an AHE uq with the free apex upgrade? From what i hear most users get good results with those quilts down into the 20's. Just another option out there for you if synthetics isnt out of the question.
    I am not particularly set either way. It seems a lot of people default to down. A question about their construction, their quilts don't appear to be channeled. Are those channels unnecessary with synthetic fibers or are KAQ's just a different type of pattern and construction? It seems like the channeled quilts would be superior in keeping the filling where you want/need it.

    Thanks all!

  3. #13
    Senior Member Fish<><'s Avatar
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    Well its a good thing you aren't set on down. Yes people default to it, but untill you start getting under 20 degrees, it doesn't have any benefit besides being slightly smaller pack volume. an issue for some, but not the most important feature of a quilt IMO.

    As far as a KAQ, the reason you are stating, is the reason I do not own one. It is not necesssary to have channels though, and with channels comes its own set of issues. Paul makes the non channel style for a reason; it works well, it's just slightly different. Since I have always used the channel style I prefer that, because there will be no learning curve in the future to get a good snug hang on my uq. I am also a DIY guy, and making a channel end is more work that I personally enjoy doing with my hobby. As always, everyone is different, but I highly recommend taking a good hard look at what kind of insulation you want. If you use a 20 degree underquilt in 70 degree weather, but if you are the least bit of a sweaty kind of person, go with synthetic. It just pays (less I might add) to be safe outdoors. Good luck in your choice and feel free to pm me anytime.
    "We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it."- G. W. Sears

    My forum name is Fish<><; I'm in the navy; and I hate sleeping on the ground. If I didn't need ground to walk on or measure resistance to, I think I could happily give it up.

  4. #14
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    My first UQ was a 20* Phoenix - it is my most versatile piece of gear. I've used it from 74 degrees down to 3 degrees.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

  5. #15
    Senior Member awilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LostAloft View Post
    In 60 degree weather does that make a 20 degree UQ obsolete (just too hot) in that situation,
    The 20 degree is not at all obsolete when it's warm. Just loosen the suspension, or set it aside if you're hot. When it's warm outside, I set up the underquilt as normal, but I leave my sleeping bag in it's stuff sack. In about an hour or two I will start to get chilly and open the sleeping bag.

    Of course, you'll always be able to sell the underquilt on here and get most of what you paid for it. So don't be too nervous. You can basically "rent" a Hammock Gear Underquilt for a year for about $50, shipping and paypal fees
    Last edited by awilder; 01-22-2014 at 22:54.

  6. #16
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    The tribe has spoken and the wallet has yielded; an Incubator 20 is now in my very near future!

    Thank you all for the guidance and advice.



    Quote Originally Posted by awilder View Post
    Of course, you'll always be able to sell the underquilt on here and get most of what you paid for it. So don't be too nervous. You can basically "rent" a Hammock Gear Underquilt for a year for about $50, shipping and paypal fees
    This is great!

  7. #17
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish<>< View Post
    Yes people default to it, but untill you start getting under 20 degrees, it doesn't have any benefit besides being slightly smaller pack volume. an issue for some, but not the most important feature of a quilt IMO.
    I don't know about that one. The equivalent to the Incubator would be the New River - the website states it's rated to 30 and weighs 30oz. Compared to the Incubator that is rated to 20 and weighs 22oz. That's a pretty substantial difference - and it still keeps me from owning one. Pack volume would also be an important consideration for me.

    If money or humidity are an issue, I'd go synthetics. Otherwise down still wins.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Fish<><'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutzelbein View Post
    I don't know about that one. The equivalent to the Incubator would be the New River - the website states it's rated to 30 and weighs 30oz. Compared to the Incubator that is rated to 20 and weighs 22oz. That's a pretty substantial difference - and it still keeps me from owning one. Pack volume would also be an important consideration for me.

    If money or humidity are an issue, I'd go synthetics. Otherwise down still wins.
    I disagree, if you look at the size of the two quilts, the Potomac is still larger. To get a 25 degree quilt with apex, one could use Apex 5.0, which unless I am misunderstanding is its weight per yard of fabric. The total that would be needed for an exact size of an incubator is 11.53 oz of apex insulation assuming my presumption is correct on weight. The incubator uses 12.8 oz of fill. Yes its a 5 degree comfort rating difference, but I believe the difference in weight for those two are difference in dimensions and shell material. At that temp rating down and CS Apex are pretty much equal. Pack size is the only concern at a 20-30 degree temp range and synthetics win at higher temps in weight.

    Congrats OP for your purchase, I am sure you will love it.
    "We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it."- G. W. Sears

    My forum name is Fish<><; I'm in the navy; and I hate sleeping on the ground. If I didn't need ground to walk on or measure resistance to, I think I could happily give it up.

  9. #19
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    If it is indeed as you say, they should really list the specs on the website.

    By the way, I think that the Potomac is a Hennessy specific underquilt - whatever that means. The New River should be the most similar to the Incubator. The size difference of those two quilts is not that extreme; 48"x78" vs. 44"x78".

    If I compare another Climashield underquilt, I don't get to a better result. Enlightened Equipment sells a 3/4 underquilt, the Prodigy. For a temp rating of 20 they use 8oz Apex. The size is 44"x44", weight 18oz. Compared to the HG Phoenix 20, 52"x45", 16oz, that is a bit smaller and a bit heavier. Not by too much, and the Prodigy is almost 30$ cheaper. But it would still be enough for me to tip the scales in favour of down - especially when throwing in another down underquilt like the Yeti, which is lighter, yet.

    Maybe the next generation of Climashield will be lighter and warmer. Then I'll be happy to get one for hiking.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Fish<><'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutzelbein View Post
    If it is indeed as you say, they should really list the specs on the website.

    By the way, I think that the Potomac is a Hennessy specific underquilt - whatever that means. The New River should be the most similar to the Incubator. The size difference of those two quilts is not that extreme; 48"x78" vs. 44"x78".

    If I compare another Climashield underquilt, I don't get to a better result. Enlightened Equipment sells a 3/4 underquilt, the Prodigy. For a temp rating of 20 they use 8oz Apex. The size is 44"x44", weight 18oz. Compared to the HG Phoenix 20, 52"x45", 16oz, that is a bit smaller and a bit heavier. Not by too much, and the Prodigy is almost 30$ cheaper. But it would still be enough for me to tip the scales in favour of down - especially when throwing in another down underquilt like the Yeti, which is lighter, yet.

    Maybe the next generation of Climashield will be lighter and warmer. Then I'll be happy to get one for hiking.
    All I am getting at is synthetics aren't as bad as most would think and they are a ton cheaper. Switching companies on a comparison is not fair. Look at the jarbidge for the 3\4 length variety and you can see it indeed is a ton cheaper than an enlightened equipment uq of similar size.

    I will not turn this into a debate of syn vs down, but I don't want our newer people think that down is the only way to stay warm at close to the same pack weight. Just saying...

    HYOH
    "We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it."- G. W. Sears

    My forum name is Fish<><; I'm in the navy; and I hate sleeping on the ground. If I didn't need ground to walk on or measure resistance to, I think I could happily give it up.

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