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  1. #11
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    I used to carry a staff and then abandoned it in favor of trekking ples for a variety of reasons. One was weight. My staffs were quite heavy. Another was uniformity. I would be hard pressed to find two staffs that were roughly the same configuration and so it would more of a problem for me to use them in pairs. I did meet a guy on the AT many years ago who went by "two sticks" He did use two different staffs as a pair but I was not able to really do so. I have to use sticks in pairs because of my dependence on them for support and balance.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member miisterwright's Avatar
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    yeah, I get that. Trekking poles are probably a better option while hiking. I'd like it if someone made a long set of trekking poles and a way to brace them so they could be used for supports. We just need to figure out how to keep them from slipping. *Lightbulb* What if there were small diameter holes drilled through them through which a pin could be inserted to keep them at a certain length?!? It works for crutches and table legs, etc..

  3. #13
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    Trecking poles are fairly thin as it is. Drilling holes in them for a pin would probably weaken their structural integrity.

  4. #14
    I agree with kykcamper. I wouldn't trust my poles after putting holes through them. One the other hand, you could take some non-adjusting poles if you where heading out into a treeless area. In Utah where I am at, that is a large percentage of the state. You might be lucky enough to find a single desert cedar to tie off to on one end, but rarely if ever both ends.

    I would also be wary of the material and shape of the poles as well. You might also lash the two poles together to make one stronger one, rather then setting them up as a bipod. When you lash them together you multiply their strength, in a bipod you risk putting most of the weight on one or the other.

  5. #15
    Senior Member pizza's Avatar
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    Interesting but I do not think I'd feel comfortable that a pole or stick would be very reliable in holding the hammock up with me in it. If I didn't have any good trees to hang from I guess I'd...do I dare say it...go to the ground.

  6. #16
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbwtt View Post
    yeah, I get that. Trekking poles are probably a better option while hiking. I'd like it if someone made a long set of trekking poles and a way to brace them so they could be used for supports. We just need to figure out how to keep them from slipping. *Lightbulb* What if there were small diameter holes drilled through them through which a pin could be inserted to keep them at a certain length?!? It works for crutches and table legs, etc..
    If you want to set the poles at a predetermined length, then simply insert wooden dowels inside the poles and collapse down against the dowels.

    Simple and doesn't require any modification to the trekking poles.

    In addition, the length of the dowels can always be changed if desired or simply removed if desired.

  7. #17
    I believe I too would agree with pizza, ateast when it comes to hiking poles. Once again, if I where heading out into the desert, I might think about taking a sturdy staff with me. The biggest reason is that I would want to avoid the ground, not just for the comfort, but around here, spending a night on the ground in the desert can put you in contact with a few nasty critters that are better avoided by simply not being on the ground.

  8. #18
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    what about making come custom treking poles out of a little heavier duty aluminum tubing. you could make them a little taller, and they'd still be pretty light. you might even be able to do a tent pole type insert to make them longer for hanging from.

    i think the pin idea might be worth messing with too.

  9. #19
    Senior Member miisterwright's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    what about making come custom treking poles out of a little heavier duty aluminum tubing. you could make them a little taller, and they'd still be pretty light. you might even be able to do a tent pole type insert to make them longer for hanging from.

    i think the pin idea might be worth messing with too.
    I think both ideas have merit. I'll continue experimenting and hopefully others will as well. A product like long trekking poles that could be used as hammock supports could really enhance hammock camping by expanding the range of terrain that is suitable for it.

  10. #20
    I do have some fixed height height end carbon fiber poles I got from when I worked at a ski resort. I don't do much skiing anymore, I might venture to try it. For me the biggest issues are strength, then height.

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