Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Ropes vs fabric for the ends of the hammock

    Hi,

    Maybe it has been discussed before but I was unable to find the right keywords: some hammocks are one piece of fabric till the ends, some have ropes to go from head/feet to attach point.

    What are the pros and cons: I assume with ropes is lighter but all fabric is stronger/more durable. What about catching rain, setup, and other practical aspects? I would tend towards ropes for weight, how much does it compromise robustness?

  2. #2
    sclittlefield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Northern woods of Maine
    Hammock
    It's a Secret.
    Tarp
    BWDD Winter Dream
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Slings
    Posts
    1,437
    Images
    95
    There is definitely the issue of ropes ripping out of the hammock fabric. I have a feeling the weight savings would be negligible, but I could be wrong.

    More important for me however is the issue of bugs. You'd need a full mosquito netting cocoon to keep them out, and there go your weight savings.

    It's certainly workable though. Just not my first choice.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

  3. #3
    Senior Member titanium_hiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Wimmera, Australia
    Hammock
    DIY speer type
    Tarp
    OES Maccat
    Insulation
    JRB Nest+ORM
    Suspension
    Webbing straps
    Posts
    746
    Images
    18
    tangle. ropes tangle.

    I wouldn't expose the ends of a rope hammock to the elements- my whole hammock goes under a tarp. Also- water likes to run down things, and wet ropes will be 1) gross 2)weaker (I think.) and 3) possibly wet the rest of the hammock, and your bedding.

    TH
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
    Winter: total 2521 (~89oz)
    (see my profile for detailed weights)

    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  4. #4
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kentucky
    Hammock
    Dual Layer WB Blackbird
    Tarp
    OES Cuben
    Insulation
    SnugFit
    Posts
    6,265
    Images
    35
    When you say fabric, are you talking about webbing straps?

    One of our members, GrizzlyAdams, just made some awesome videos that discuss the merits of both rope and webbing suspension systems. Great primer for those just starting out. Check out these videos.

    A Brief Primer on Hammock Suspension, Part I : webbing


    A Brief Primer on Hammock Suspension, Part II : cord
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



    Premium Quality, Fresh Roasted Coffee
    www.meancatcoffee.com

  5. #5
    No, I was refering to the part of the hammock up your head and down your feet where the fabric (or alternatively the ropes) gather in a single point to be attached.

    Sorry for the awkward description, English not my primary language.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker View Post
    tangle. ropes tangle.

    I wouldn't expose the ends of a rope hammock to the elements- my whole hammock goes under a tarp. Also- water likes to run down things, and wet ropes will be 1) gross 2)weaker (I think.) and 3) possibly wet the rest of the hammock, and your bedding.

    TH
    I think you want the tarp to cover the whole length, be it ropes or fabric; it would not matter.

    Tangling is of course one potential issue.

    Overall fabric all the way seems simpler and stronger.

  7. #7
    Senior Member titanium_hiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Wimmera, Australia
    Hammock
    DIY speer type
    Tarp
    OES Maccat
    Insulation
    JRB Nest+ORM
    Suspension
    Webbing straps
    Posts
    746
    Images
    18
    Have you seen Risk's site? (http://www.imrisk.com/)

    it's what got me into hammock DIY, and the information on there is "old school" - what I mean is it was written before all the information and experiments on different suspension systems happened.

    It might be helpful to "go back to basics" and start from their with a clear picture in your head.

    Scroll down for the hammock DIY guides.

    TH
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
    Winter: total 2521 (~89oz)
    (see my profile for detailed weights)

    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Heber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    State College, PA
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    Zparks Cuben
    Insulation
    DIY Synthetic UQ
    Suspension
    marlin/whoopie
    Posts
    154
    Byer hammocks have ropes or strings rather than material as the ends of the hammock. I'm not sure if there is a weight advantage. There is a disadvantage to some kinds of string because of the stretch.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    The idea of rope ended hammocks is Brazilian in origin. Random pic from Google:



    I am a HUGE fan of this style of hammock! I sleep in one every night at home. I have a few Mayans and a couple of Nicaraguan style hammocks too, but the Brazilians are tops in my book. My theory is that because the fabric is supported by multiple attachment points, you don't get the ridges or bumps in the fabric like you do with a single attachment point. It allows the hammock material to conform to your body even better. When I sleep in the basement and it's pitch black, I get a real sense of sensory deprivation because there comes a point when I can't 'feel' the hammock below me.

    The Byer model is a nice try, but comes up a little short in my book (literally). A traditional Brazilian hammock is usually around 12' - 14' long, but the bigger issue with the Byer rig is the width of the fabric; it just isn't wide enough for a large person to get that 'Brazilian feel'.

    Tangling when used in a backpacking environment is the bane of my existence. I have a couple of methods that work OK for keeping the lines tangle-free so it can be done. If they make them a few inches wider, I'd carry it more often. Brazilians Rule!
    Trust nobody!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Oh, and I wouldn't worry much about the lines ripping away from the hammock fabric. The one I sleep in most nights has well over 300 nights on it including some 'private time' with my girl. There is absolutely no sign of fatigue or anything else that would cause me concern with the connections. They are pretty darn solid.
    Trust nobody!

Similar Threads

  1. Indoor Hammock Ropes Cut During Delivery
    By Singingcrowsings in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-29-2013, 13:47
  2. DIY Yardsale (fabric, cord, odds and ends)
    By Corncob in forum [SOLD/WITHDRAWN] Items no longer available
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 05-30-2013, 09:13
  3. Rigging a hammock with constrictor ropes (UCR's)...
    By ZA206 in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 187
    Last Post: 09-19-2012, 14:25
  4. 1st hammock, local stores ropes, webbing??
    By Incacamper in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 04-02-2008, 16:16
  5. Squaring up the ends of fabric
    By cameronjreed in forum Fabrics
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 07-13-2007, 01:49

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •