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  1. #1
    Senior Member pineapplenewton's Avatar
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    Question inches to degrees for underquilt

    Hey Im planning on going on a week camping trip with a hammock that I made but I don't like having a pad in the hammock with me (I know lots of people don't either) So I need to make my own under quilt (can't afford to buy one right now) I have a verity of cheep sleeping bags and that means down to rectangle Disney character ones. I was wondering if anyone knows aproximity how many inches of insulating material you need for what temperatures. (I know that it depends on the type of insulation but im trying to find a general idea)
    I reject your reality and substitute my own

  2. #2
    Senior Member titanium_hiker's Avatar
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    this for down, but:
    http://jacksrbetter.com/FAQ.htm (Loft to degrees table from JRB)

    Of course, all temperature ratings are subjective... how cold do you sleep? (I sleep cold... need lots of warmth. some people seem to have their own inner furnaces and sleep warm.)

    TH
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
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    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  3. #3
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    I don't have an answer, but a somewhat related question. I have an older down bag which was made by Mt. Hardwear, called Crazy legs. I think it is 550 fill down. I'm rather ingorant about the technical aspects of these things and wonder if I would need more loft to achieve a certain level of warmth? or is it that I will need more of the 550 fill power down (say as opposed to 800 or 900) to acheive a certain loft? The answer is probably somewhere in the forum, but I'm rather overwhlemed with all the info. I was debating between two different made underquilts, but found this old bag (for down) and already have some fabric (Walmart, $1.50/yd ripstop, slippery and somewhat translucent- think it's 1.1 ripstop). I have some sewing skills, but have not made any gear. The forum has got me encouraged to try an underquilt, particularly with the great instructions found here as well. Info on the above re: fill weights and loft/temp would be helpful. Thanks! Pong

  4. #4
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    Pong,

    higher quality means it will take less down to keep you warm, so the resulting quilt/garment will be much lighter than one made with down of lesser quality.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fill_power

    The down you might harvest from an old bag will probably be 550-600 fp unless it's a high quality bag like Western Mountaineering or Montbell. The resulting quilt will be heavier than a comparable sized quilt made with 800-900 fp down. Not as heavy as a synthetic with the same temp rating, but not as light as it could be.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Pong... I don't want to rain on you parade... but be very careful of the ripstop from walmart for down projects. Particularly with <800 down. Lower down quality includes more quill feathers. Unknown quality ripstop may not be down proof. In other words it will allow the down to leak out sometimes rather magnificently. I'm not saying "don't use it", particularly with cheaper down which is cheaper to replace, but what you want for a down quilt project is calendared ripstop and there is no way you can know whether the stuff in wally world is calendared. (Heated between rollers to help seal the weave.) From the reading I have done calendared 1.1 ripstop is considered down proof. I would not know how to cehck the cheap stuff to determine if it is and the folks at the fabric department probably can't tell you either. They get what they get and that's what they have.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  6. #6
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    ...but what you want for a down quilt project is calendared ripstop and there is no way you can know whether the stuff in wally world is calendared. (Heated between rollers to help seal the weave.) From the reading I have done calendared 1.1 ripstop is considered down proof....
    Interesting thought that I haven't seen discussed on the forum before - has anyone tried their own calendaring process? Perhaps with low heat and lots of pressure with an iron?
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

  7. #7
    Senior Member Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by angrysparrow View Post
    Interesting thought that I haven't seen discussed on the forum before - has anyone tried their own calendaring process? Perhaps with low heat and lots of pressure with an iron?
    http://www.montbell.us/products/tech...aterial21.html

    it's got pictures of the before and after. I strongly suspect the heat plays as much a part as the roller pressure if not more so.

    http://channel.nationalgeographic.co...1_04700300.jpg

    There's a pic of the machine for the process.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  8. #8
    if it's calendared, one side should be shiny looking. if both sides are calendared it might be harder to tell. alot of 1.9 ripstop is calendared on one side while alot of 1.1 is done on both i think

    you will want calendared for down, and not all 1.1 is calendared.

  9. #9
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    Or, you could use momentum instead of ripstop... but that's more expense.

  10. #10
    Senior Member pineapplenewton's Avatar
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    I mentioned this idea in another thread but how about making a quilt pad hybrid by making sot of scales out of a pad and incorporating them into a quilt. It gives the pad flexibility, holds the pad in place and puts fabric in between you and the pad. Any thoughts?
    I reject your reality and substitute my own

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