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  1. #11
    Jshep420's Avatar
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    I love the spindrift sock for the wbrr. UQ is great but the sock finishes the job. This next trip I will be taking it off for the warmer weather and relying on the poncho/under cover. I haven't used it yet. So with that being said, I do live my sock and would say its worth the weight for me! This is how it worked for me!

    Thanks
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRl...MK2HAUuKvTzHug

  2. #12
    oldpappy's Avatar
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    Nov 2012
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    Northern Virginia
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    HH BE for bugs, DIY for cold
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    I have both UQP and Just Jeff DIY version of a sock (a pod style soft tyvek sock)
    The 2QZQ UQP, with bridge tabs, will tie together to close the UQP up on top (the 4 bridge hammock tabs are an extra $3). There is still a 3" or 4" gap on top for blowing snow or rain to dampen things (a big funnel) - but it works with a tarp and is easier to vent in warm weather. Sock is water/wind proof and condensation hasn't been a problem in my 1 winter of usage. Sock is significantly warmer in cold windy weather. Sock is 8.5 oz and UQP is 6.5 oz. The DIY sock materials cost about the same as a 2QZQ UQP.
    Short version - UQP is more versatile and provides 90% of the coverage a sock provides, but you need a good tarp to keep blowing rain/snow out.
    Yes they are worth carrying - one of those items that you didn't know you needed until you have tried one.
    Enjoying the simple things in life.
    Hennessey and DIY
    2 Seasons: Bug season and too cold for bugs

  3. #13
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    I have only used my hammock sock a couple of times, and never in winter. I haven't used it for wind protection, but simply to trap warmth. A warmer underquilt only provides warmth where you are in contact with it. I like to sleep cool, but I don't like it really cold. The sock helps a lot with this. It will keep the warm air you produce, so you lose less heat with breathing etc.

    I would probably go with a thinner underquilt and a sock instead of a very warm underquilt.

  4. #14
    gunner76's Avatar
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    Dec 2009
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    Beaufort, NC
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    I like to use mine when it is cool and very windy as the wind will suck the warmth right out of the hammock and UQ. Last time I used mine I had the solid side facing the wind, no tarp, with the door open. I was very comfortable. Temps were about freezing.
    Frosty Butt Hang Jan 2015 .................. Fat Butt Hang April 2015..........Hunger / Halloween Hang Oct 2015

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    I am 18 with 44 years of experience !

  5. #15
    Senior Member
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    May 2013
    Location
    Boulder, CO
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    Warbonnet RidgeRunner
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    Here's why I got a Spindrift. One of the problems you have with UQ's is making sure you enough warmth but not so much that you are too warm. When it is below freezing you have to worry about exposed skin. That prevents you from regulating your temp by uncovering yourself. I figured the Spindrift would solve this problem because I can bring an UQ/TQ combo that are rated for higher temps and use the Spindrift to "cover" the gap. I can regulate my temp using the door.

    Another reason was to give me a safety margin in colder conditions. If the temp drops unexpectedly lower than forecast, I can always set it up and have as much as a 20* warmer configuration.

    Yet another reason is because I like looking at the stars at night and it's kind of a hassle to get up and have to change your tarp configuration when you're about to go to sleep. With the Spindrift, I can just zip it closed without getting out of my toasty warm bed.

    I tested the first hypothesis in my backyard. It was around 25*/snowing and I was using a TQ rated to 32* with a double layer Reflectix pad underneath. With the Spindrift, I was very comfortable.

    I would love to hear from people who have more experience using socks. I haven't had mine very long so I haven't had time to use it much yet.
    I held a moment in my hand, brilliant as a star, fragile as a flower, a tiny sliver of one hour. I dropped it carelessly, Ah! I didn't know, I held opportunity. -Hazel Lee

  6. #16
    New Member
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    Nov 2012
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    SoVT
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    WB Blackbird
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    kelty noah 12
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    I use a sock when I'm backpacking for extended periods and less aware of what the weather is going to be like. On my blackbird, the sock/hammock combo can be stored together, which makes it a bit bulkier, but not bad. I like how I can pack up my entire sleep system from inside the hammock/sock without worrying about getting my UQ wet- or if some serious weather comes through it will keep my UQ dry. I guess it isnt too hard to carefully take off your UQ without a sock being on, but it's a nice protective backup from both water and bugs while quickly packing up in the morning- something I pay attention to while backpacking solo.

    First time using it was hanging during a noreaster, and the temp/wind protection was noticeable- one night the temps got down below zero, no idea what the wind chill was. Even in the coldest temps I leave it cracked open, and during the summer months I leave it mostly open- one morning i woke up to frost lining the inside of it because i guess i was breathing heavy that night. It does create a more closed-in experience while sleeping in, but the piece of mind of not having an UQ that will get stuffed away in a dry bag while damp all day is pretty solid.

  7. #17
    King Dork brooklynkayak's Avatar
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    Oct 2013
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    My experience is with several colder nights this past fall through spring. Temps ranged from 40f to less than 20f. One night with snow, hail and wind up to 40 MPH temps below 20 deg f.
    I was in a 30 degree sleeping bag and a 20 deg underquilt and was warm. i have since moved to a lighter smaller 30f underquilt.

    Mine is the Warbonnet sock. I have never slept with it fully zipped up. I left the area at the top open at least a few inches and never had any condensation/frost collecting.

    The Warbonnet is highly breathable, but water resistant. I think this is the best way to go to block wind, but also breath enough to reduce condensation. I would not go with less breathable materials because of the condensation issue.

    The Warbonnet has a very well designed zipper for this purpose allowing you to zip the ends in to avoid the spray and wind that often comes in the ends of the tarp. Leaving just a gap in the more protected center allows the warmer moister air to rise and vent out the top reducing condensation.

    I found I would often go to sleep with it zipped wide open and then zip it partially or mostly closed as the night got colder.

    There are many advantages to this sock that makes it well worth the extra weight and money:
    1) You can easily go with lighter insulation. Subtract 10 degrees or more from your top and bottom insulation. It really does add a lot of warmth.

    2) You can get by with a smaller tarp. You don't have to worry so much about spray or splash and wind is not so much of a problem. You DO need a tarp to avoid direct precipitation. It is not waterproof and you don't want it waterproof.

    3) It helps with less than perfect fitting underquilts by reducing airflow that can cause cold butt syndrome.

    4) No more painful cold nose/face. No need for a balaclava on cold nights.

    It's the best 9 ounces in my pack during the cooler months.
    Last edited by brooklynkayak; 07-06-2014 at 08:37. Reason: correction
    A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.
    -- William James

  8. #18
    donig's Avatar
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    Nov 2012
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    Richmond, VA
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    I have a Dream Hammocks Winter Sock (http://www.dream-hammock.com/WinterSock.html). It is definitely worth the cost and weight in the winter - easily adds 10 to 15 degrees warmth and blocks the wind.

  9. #19

    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swoopy View Post
    I like how I can pack up my entire sleep system from inside the hammock/sock without worrying about getting my UQ wet- or if some serious weather comes through it will keep my UQ dry. I guess it isnt too hard to carefully take off your UQ without a sock being on, but it's a nice protective backup from both water and bugs while quickly packing up in the morning- something I pay attention to while backpacking solo.
    That's a good idea. Are you actually hanging inside while you do this, or are you standing outside the hammock reaching inside to do your packing?

    Forgive me if I'm covering an old subject, but it seems like a sturdy sock could provide a place to store your pack and other light gear under you while you sleep. Does a sock provide a bit of a utility hammock function under your hammock, which is sturdy enough to hang things in (under your UQ)? Would that cause damage to the hammock or sock? Would it deform an UQ enough to disrupt its efficacy, or might the extra weight pull the top of the sock down too tightly against the RL? I don't know how these things are attached to know where it might put stresses on the hammock or suspension, but I'm exciting by the prospect of having another layer of utility hammock underneath me when the conditions warrant it.

  10. #20
    King Dork brooklynkayak's Avatar
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    Re: "Forgive me if I'm covering an old subject, but it seems like a sturdy sock could provide a place to store your pack and other light gear under you while you sleep."
    My only experience is with the Warbonnet sock.
    I don't think it would be a good idea to put much weight in the sock itself. It would cause the sock to squeeze in on the sides making a tight sleep area. It would also compress the sides of your insulation causing cold spots.
    A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.
    -- William James

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