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  1. #11
    flatline's Avatar
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    the guys on my TadPole are 4' lengths 1/8 shock cord and that's all.
    maybe a little heavy but they work very well.
    just hang the ridge, jab a stob in the ground, stretch the cord some, double wrap and a slip knot and i'm done.
    no fiddling or adjusting required and it virtually tangle free.

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  2. #12
    Senior Member Gravity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillbillyHanger View Post
    What knot did you use/recommend to secure the loop to the guy line near the bowline (last step)? Thanks again.
    A simple overhand knot will do:
    http://www.animatedknots.com/overhan...matedknots.com

    Tensioner overhand knot:
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...5&d=1398829599

    Tensioner shock cord loop fully stretched:
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...6&d=1398829623
    Last edited by Gravity; 04-29-2014 at 22:58.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gravity View Post
    Thanks for the additional pictures.

  4. #14
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    A simpler way with a shock cord loop. It lacks the "limiting" feature, but that may not be so important if one is careful. Don't get confused with the discussion about prussick knots or the way the rest of the line is made, just look at the shock cord loop. The relevant segment starts at the 5 minute mark.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj7yw3n_IPM

  5. #15
    Senior Member Gravity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatline View Post
    The guys on my Tadpole are 4' lengths 1/8 shock cord and that's all. Maybe a little heavy but they work very well. Just hang the ridge, jab a stob in the ground, stretch the cord some, double wrap and a slip knot, and i'm done.No fiddling or adjusting required and it is virtually tangle free.
    A possible issue with this approach is that long lines of stretched shock cord store a relatively large amount of potential energy. If a stake suddenly slips out of the ground, the shock cord will act like a sling shooting a pointy projectile towards the walls of your tarp. Shorter lengths of shock cord are safer.

  6. #16
    flatline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gravity View Post
    A possible issue with this approach is that long lines of stretched shock cord store a relatively large amount of potential energy. If a stake suddenly slips out of the ground, the shock cord will act like a sling shooting a pointy projectile towards the walls of your tarp. Shorter lengths of shock cord are safer.
    You are correct, stakes make wicked projectiles.

    That happened to me on Mt Mitchell, but it was when I was using tensioners.
    Full length shock cord allows for less stress on the stake, unless they are stretched "to their max."
    The only issue I have experienced is in high winds, the tarp can be pressed into the hammock.

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  7. #17
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    I am considering using Marshalltown #18 braided masons line for guy lines. Anyone tried it with shock cord?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatline View Post
    You are correct, stakes make wicked projectiles.

    That happened to me on Mt Mitchell, but it was when I was using tensioners.
    Full length shock cord allows for less stress on the stake, unless they are stretched "to their max."
    The only issue I have experienced is in high winds, the tarp can be pressed into the hammock.
    You make some good points, but also obfuscate the issue a little bit. A full shock cord guyout may be gentle on the stake if not stretched to the max, but so would a combination of shock cord and regular cord, as in the system discussed in this thread (which I will call HC4U tensioners).

    Now an additional argument in favor of the hc4u tensioners: Imagine a dark, windy, rainy night in the woods. One strong gust of wind makes your shock cord break. Half of a tarp wall is now flailing in the wind. You and your gear are getting soaked, and now you have to go out, look for the two ends of the broken shock cord, and tie them up, while getting soaked some more.

    Now take the same scenario with the hc4u tensioners. The shock cord breaks, but the regular cord takes over. Half of a tarp wall is now loose, but not completely detached, and still provides some coverage. You go out and quickly tension the line (prussick, line-lok, etc). You and your gear may still get soaked, but chances are that it won't be as bad.

    This scenario works because regular guyout cord should be stronger and more durable than shock cord. Also, the shock cord in hc4u tensioners helps reduce the tugging that the regular lines (and stakes) experience, thus prolonging the lines' life even further.
    Last edited by Gravity; 05-16-2014 at 15:15.

  9. #19
    flatline's Avatar
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    p







    Quote Originally Posted by Gravity View Post
    You make some good points, but also obfuscate the issue a little bit. A full shock cord guyout may be gentle on the stake if not stretched to the max, but so would a combination of shock cord and regular cord, as in the system discussed in this thread (which I will call HC4U tensioners).

    Now an additional argument in favor of the hc4u tensioners: Imagine a dark, windy, rainy night in the woods. One strong gust of wind makes your shock cord break. Half of a tarp wall is now flailing in the wind. You and your gear are getting soaked, and now you have to go out, look for the two ends of the broken shock cord, and tie them up, while getting soaked some more.

    Now take the same scenario with the hc4u tensioners. The shock cord breaks, but the regular cord takes over. Half of a tarp wall is now loose, but not completely detached, and still provides some coverage. You go out and quickly tension the line (prussick, line-lok, etc). You and your gear may still get soaked, but chances are that it won't be as bad.

    This scenario works because regular guyout cord should be stronger and more durable than shock cord. Also, the shock cord in hc4u tensioners helps reduce the tugging that the regular lines (and stakes) experience, thus prolonging the lines' life even further.
    thanks for pointing these short comings, they,re good for others to see.
    Shock Cord is by no means the best meathod, but, it is what I use.

    CLICK HERE to add your name to the world wide H F member location list. And Thank You!


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  10. #20
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    "I am considering using Marshalltown #18 braided masons line for guy lines. Anyone tried it with shock cord?"

    I just finished three nights on the Uwharrie Trail with heavy rain during two of them. The #18 braided masons line worked perfectly. Even with hours of rain the shock cord tensioners and masons line held the Tadpole perfectly.

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