Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Washington State
    Hammock
    ENO singlenest
    Tarp
    ENO Profly
    Insulation
    AHE jarbidge UQ
    Suspension
    Marlinspike/whoopi
    Posts
    9

    SOL Emergency Bivvy

    On my last outing, I had discovered that my 30 degree bag was not cutting it for top warmth (I also had an AHE jarbidge UQ but that worked great). Although it is currently summer, I frequently backpack/camp overnight in higher elevations where the temperatures may drop close to freezing (It is supposed to be 90 degrees today and I still can see some snow on the mountains!).

    So I was considering my options on upgrading my sleeping bag to a down quilt. Seeing how I do not want to spend that kind of money, nor do I really have much time for a DIY top quilt, I have been considering what other options that I have...

    I came across the SOL Emergency Bivvy, which weighs in at only 3.8 ounces and claims to reflect 90% of body heat. This might just be the perfect thing to add some extra insulation to my sleeping bag! I just have a few questions on those of you who may own/have used one of these on camping/backpacking trips.

    Did you use it by itself or along with a bag/quilt? What kind of temps were you in? What temps would you think you would be comfortable with, in one of these bivys? Did it turn your bag into a sweat-box, trapping moisture? Any first hand experience/ input is appreciated!

    Thanks!

    -Slick
    Last edited by slickrock; 07-13-2014 at 13:42.

  2. #2
    Meekin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Hammock
    DIY Stretch Side, WBBB
    Tarp
    UGQ Hanger
    Insulation
    UGQ & HG
    Suspension
    ALL KINDS
    Posts
    157
    Bivys like the sol are basically a vapor barrier. They will keep you warm but you will have condensation issues because they do not "breathe". There are numerous threads that get into the how and why. Some are very technical and informative.
    Common sense is like deodorant. The people who need it most never use it.

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Washington State
    Hammock
    ENO singlenest
    Tarp
    ENO Profly
    Insulation
    AHE jarbidge UQ
    Suspension
    Marlinspike/whoopi
    Posts
    9
    They claim it is "breathable"....but they said the same thing about gore-tex too haha!

  4. #4
    Herder of Cats OutandBack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    6,335
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by slickrock View Post
    On my last outing, I had discovered that my 30 degree bag was not cutting it for top warmth (I also had an AHE jarbidge UQ but that worked great). Although it is currently summer, I frequently backpack/camp overnight in higher elevations where the temperatures may drop close to freezing (It is supposed to be 90 degrees today and I still can see some snow on the mountains!).

    So I was considering my options on upgrading my sleeping bag to a down quilt. Seeing how I do not want to spend that kind of money, nor do I really have much time for a DIY top quilt, I have been considering what other options that I have...

    I came across the SOL Emergency Bivvy, which weighs in at only 3.8 ounces and claims to reflect 90% of body heat. This might just be the perfect thing to add some extra insulation to my sleeping bag! I just have a few questions on those of you who may own/have used one of these on camping/backpacking trips.

    Did you use it by itself or along with a bag/quilt? What kind of temps were you in? What temps would you think you would be comfortable with, in one of these bivys? Did it turn your bag into a sweat-box, trapping moisture? Any first hand experience/ input is appreciated!

    Thanks!

    -Slick
    A 30 degree SB should keep you warm down to freezing (32F)
    Makes me wonder if you have your UQ adjusted properly.
    It needs to be right up against you with no gaps.

    No amount of TQ will keep you warm if your UQ is not adjusted properly.
    hth
    O&B
    May your mileage in the backcountry exceed your post count.

  5. #5
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Washington State
    Hammock
    ENO singlenest
    Tarp
    ENO Profly
    Insulation
    AHE jarbidge UQ
    Suspension
    Marlinspike/whoopi
    Posts
    9
    Like I said, my underquilt was fine, my back/bottom/shoulders were warm. I was warmish with my 30 degree bag, but could have been warmer if I had a little extra insulation. (I was also wearing merino wool long johns). As far as UQ adjustment, I was sure to watch the video that Paul from KAQ put up before staying out overnight with it.

  6. #6
    Meekin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Hammock
    DIY Stretch Side, WBBB
    Tarp
    UGQ Hanger
    Insulation
    UGQ & HG
    Suspension
    ALL KINDS
    Posts
    157

    SOL Emergency Bivvy

    Have you ever tried putting a hot water bottle in your sleeping bag before climbing in? I've done that before and it really made a big difference for about 6 hours.
    Last edited by Meekin; 07-13-2014 at 19:20.
    Common sense is like deodorant. The people who need it most never use it.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Hammock
    WB Blackbird
    Tarp
    WB Edge
    Insulation
    HG Incubator 40
    Suspension
    Whoopie and straps
    Posts
    60
    I have one of those SOL emergency bivys. It'll achieve what you want temperature wise but they don't breath (the more expensive Escape version supposedly does but I haven't tested it) so you will likely get condensation. Getting into one in a hammock wouldn't be fun either. The foot and part of the side are closed with velcro so wriggling to get into position in the hammock may open the velcro. Also, while not as bad a space blanket, they're not silent either so if you move around and don't like noise it's another factor to consider.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Washington State
    Hammock
    ENO singlenest
    Tarp
    ENO Profly
    Insulation
    AHE jarbidge UQ
    Suspension
    Marlinspike/whoopi
    Posts
    9
    If I get one maybe I will just cut one side to make it better suited for a hammock. I may get the rectangular shaped one instead of a bivvy but it is significantly more heavy. I did read that the escape one is made to be more breathable...

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    PA
    Hammock
    Dutch 11
    Tarp
    Toxaway w ZQ mods
    Insulation
    Quilts
    Suspension
    All Dutchware
    Posts
    374
    If your looking for just a little more warmth, try putting one these over your chest,

    http://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Adhes...ds+body+warmer

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Hammock
    WB Blackbird
    Tarp
    WB Edge
    Insulation
    HG Incubator 40
    Suspension
    Whoopie and straps
    Posts
    60
    How much weight are you willing to tolerate? Perhaps one of the Sea to Summit or similar) bag liners? It could possibly even be opened up partially to make it more like a hammock quilt with a foot box? I'm probably the last person to be giving advice on what's need for cold conditions. it just doesn't get that cold here.

Similar Threads

  1. SOL Emergency Bivvy as my Bag
    By madhatter in forum Top Insulation
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 08-26-2013, 17:33
  2. Breathable bivvy?
    By ChristineM in forum Top Insulation
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-23-2012, 08:10
  3. Bivvy bag as Pod??
    By mikewilkinson in forum Do-It-Yourself (DIY)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-02-2010, 14:52
  4. NCP's Bug bivvy v.2
    By NCPatrick in forum Suspension Systems, Ridgelines, & Bug Nets
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 02-20-2010, 07:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •