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Thread: Nylon webbing.

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    Nylon webbing.

    So I was fortunate to buy 2 100yd rolls of 1" nylon webbing. From what I've read it seems it may not be appropriate for straps as some say it stretches. But I must say this stuff feels very stout and has a 4500 lb test. So I'm gonna give it a whirl this weekend. Any suggestions on possible ways to strengthen the webbing to alleviate some of the stretch? ie doubling it up and stitching loops? At .05 a foot gotta be good for something

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    Senior Member nuttysquirrel's Avatar
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    Its not about strength at all. The fiber itself stretches severely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by edgeaddict View Post
    So I was fortunate to buy 2 100yd rolls of 1" nylon webbing. From what I've read it seems it may not be appropriate for straps as some say it stretches.
    Are these straps just 'tree straps', or will they extend most of the way to the hammock?
    I wouldn't worry much about the stretch; see what your test shows you. As I recall from my climbing days the stretch in webbing was much less than in nylon cordage.

    BTW, if this is tubular climbing webbing, it won't work well in buckles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VictoriaGuy View Post
    Are these straps just 'tree straps', or will they extend most of the way to the hammock?
    I wouldn't worry much about the stretch; see what your test shows you. As I recall from my climbing days the stretch in webbing was much less than in nylon cordage.

    BTW, if this is tubular climbing webbing, it won't work well in buckles.
    Hopefully my 11' hammock with 6' whoopies will go most of the distance. I don't know how far apart the trees will be but I'd imagine I'll be only using two or three feet of a tail from each strap. Its not tubular just flat webbing. I'm gonna do a test run probably tomorrow when my hammock arrives. Seeing how I have so much webbing I thought about doubling it up to alleviate some of the stretch. Either that or pitch my hang higher and allow for some sag.

    No buckles will be used. Gonna tie or stitch a loop in one end and use a marlin spike hitch (I hope I got that right)

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    minor inconvenience if any

    Not an experienced expert here but it basically just means you may need to get out and adjust it after you have been in the hammock for an hour or so.
    If it were lighter duty nylon webbing I might not want to use it with cam buckles on a trailer or car roof rack for fear highway speeds cause it to stretch and the cargo gets loose. By comparison gradually sinking toward the ground in a hammock is a minor inconvenience. Just get out and cinch it up.

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    The problem I had with nylon, lighter stuff than you have, is that when it stretched it caused enough friction in the loop that it melted and fused together. I ended up having to cut if off the tree, there was enough tension that it actually made a snapping noise when I cut it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouseskowitz View Post
    The problem I had with nylon, lighter stuff than you have, is that when it stretched it caused enough friction in the loop that it melted and fused together. I ended up having to cut if off the tree, there was enough tension that it actually made a snapping noise when I cut it.
    That sounds like a pita. I have some 10 foot can buckle tie downs too that I'm gonna try out as well but being that I'm in California and dealing with some rather large pine trees I'm more worried about having the length to wrap around the trees more than the span between trees.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ntxkayakr View Post
    Not an experienced expert here but it basically just means you may need to get out and adjust it after you have been in the hammock for an hour or so.
    If it were lighter duty nylon webbing I might not want to use it with cam buckles on a trailer or car roof rack for fear highway speeds cause it to stretch and the cargo gets loose. By comparison gradually sinking toward the ground in a hammock is a minor inconvenience. Just get out and cinch it up.
    Sounds like I could fix this pretty easy by just adjusting my whoopies to accommodate the sag as well. Again I'm not even an amateur yet as I have yet to hang my first hammock. But I figure its better to start sorting things out now vs later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by edgeaddict View Post
    ...I thought about doubling it up to alleviate some of the stretch....
    ...No buckles will be used. Gonna tie or stitch a loop in one end and use a marlin spike hitch (I hope I got that right)
    I'll save you some time...don't stitch two layers of webbing together. It will become very stiff and you won't be able to tie a MSH to hang the whoopies on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr View Post
    I'll save you some time...don't stitch two layers of webbing together. It will become very stiff and you won't be able to tie a MSH to hang the whoopies on.
    Good looking out. I may string up some weights from my oak tree and let them dangle overnight and see how bad the stretch is.

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