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Thread: peapod

  1. #1
    lazyboy's Avatar
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    peapod

    I don't own an underquilt and want to winter hammock this year so here is my question. I now have a Cat's Meow synthetic bag and have been wanting to upgrade to down so why not just get a Peapod? Correct me if my assumptions are wrong or share what you know with me please.

    Sleeping bag is not needed when using the Peapod.

    I should be fine in the North Georgia Mountains, it rarely gets below 30 f and I can always put on more clothes. This is where I do almost all of my backpacking.

    A sleeping pad is not needed with the Peapod.

    The peapod is big enough for a 6'4" 225 lb guy like me.

    Seems to me like the perfect option for me but I figured why not pick your brains before I buy it.

    I use a ENO Singlenest and Grand Trunk double hammock.

  2. #2
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazyboy View Post
    ..... Correct me if my assumptions are wrong or share what you know with me please.

    Sleeping bag is not needed when using the Peapod.
    Depends on the person and the temp, of course, but also even the hammock. But you will most certainly need LESS bag or quilt on top, a lot less IMO. The warmest Pod is conservatively rated 20*F on the BOTTOM by itself, and good by itself to a certain temp on top, but not as warm ( for the most part) ON TOP as an equally thick top quilt would be. This is because most hammocks will tend to lift the pod up off of your body, leaving a space that will decrease warmth. The wider and deeper the hammock, the more it will lift the pod and the bigger and colder the space will be. And with any top gap at all, warm air will tend to rush out of your breathing hole, unless you have some means with a summer top quilt or clothing, to stop this draft.

    If your hammock is narrow enough, the pod will tend to droop down onto your body, getting rid of most of the above problems on top.

    Ed Speer considers himself a very cold sleeper, and he only rates the Pea Pod to 50*F ON TOP by itself. I have always found I can do much better than that, even with the kind of wide/deep Speer hammock. At least the 40s.

    Using a narrow Claytor hammock, I was a-OK in the low 30sF with just clothing, and just barely OK at 27*F. I used a down vest and/or a light 14 oz Polarguard jacket draped over the top of me. This would adequately "seal" off below my neck, stopping drafts. I definitely got by OK for a week of this( it was also wet and windy), and saved a lot of weight with dual use of my camp clothes which I definitely needed while sitting around camp. However, I think a very light top quilt would have been much warmer and easier to use. Even a 40 or 50*F narrow top quilt would get me by on top to some pretty cold temps, probably well below 20. But I don't need anything else on the bottom unless it goes below 20.


    I should be fine in the North Georgia Mountains, it rarely gets below 30 f and I can always put on more clothes. This is where I do almost all of my backpacking.

    A sleeping pad is not needed with the Peapod.
    Correct, as long as you are above 20*F, at least for me. YMMV. But depending on how cold of a sleeper you are, at some point (obviously) you will need to add clothing or a pad or at least a space blanket/vapor barrier under your hammock. I have a friend who used a 55*F rated PeaPod on the same trip( in the 20s) mentioned above. He also had a 25*F down NF semi-rectangular bag as quilt, and a pad under the hammock, down in the PeaPod. He was extremely warm and comfortable the entire trip, warmer than any one else I think.

    The peapod is big enough for a 6'4" 225 lb guy like me.
    Hmm. Probably. I am 6'1" and about 205 LB on that last trip. It is not the worlds roomiest option for bigger guys. But I guess if you can fit in an ENO single, you should be OK. Height will be no problem, it is 9 ft long!

    The Pea Pod is an extremely efficient way of being warm in a gathered end, top loading hammock, IMO. I have not yet read anything by a pod user saying they were not warm at or above the rated temps, you sure can't say that about every thing out there. And if closed completely ( claustrophobes forget it), you get an amazing and quick increase in warmth, and so far I have not seen any noticeable condensation problems eve fully closed. To my surprise. However, a nice under quilt with a separate top quilt is a roomier, more open option, unless you are able to leave the pod mostly open on top. And probably warmer for the weight on top

    The PeaPod weighs about the same, or an oz or 2 more, as 2 No Snivelers. At least on top, I'm pretty sure the No Sniv is def warmer, def if using a wide hammock. However, I'm pretty sure that if you add even a very light summer top quilt, then the pod is warmer than the No Sniv, probably by a fair amount. So.......... It can be tricky doing comparisons, at least for top warmth.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  3. #3
    Senior Member Wentworth's Avatar
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    I love my peapod. It does limit my ability to lie on the diagonal slightly, but by closing it right up, except for a 1" gap above my face, I haven't needed any other top quilt. I too have not noticed any condensation or significant weight in pack up the next morning.

  4. #4
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    I did something similar to a peapod. This thread was a work in progress. As it evolved (scroll down a ways), I used my bag and modified it to work like a peapod. It is a little confining in the knee area, but works fine. The other downfall of this setup is that it cannot be used with a hammock that has the mosquito netting sewn on. Not a problem if you are using a sock-style of netting. Give it a look, might work for you. Try sliding your bag on your hammock, via the foot end zipper.
    Since your using a single wide to hang in, I thought this could be an option.
    I did a few test hangs, prior to getting to stinking hot out, and it worked fine. Kept me warm and definitely did a good job eliminating drafts.

    Just another option, before you buy more gear. My 2 cents.
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  5. #5
    lazyboy's Avatar
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    Thanks, so much good information!!

  6. #6
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    Another user...

    I am another peapod user. I am 6'5" 230lbs and it is roomy enough for me. I agree that depending on hammock the air space above you is a problem. I am comfortable in my 30* model in the 20's with the addition of a JRB Stealth on top inside. Another thing that really helps is one of these...

    http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeGearPeaPodHood.html

    I made one. It is really an easy DIY project. Would be even easier if you have an old fleece hooded jacket from which to steal the hood. I also use a JRB down hood in the winter and it will mate with the peapod velcro just fine. As Jeff says it keeps the warm air inside when you move. When the temps get cool the peapod will always be my choice.
    Gentle raindrops and mighty oceans...neither can exist without the other.
    Time heals all wounds...but it usually leaves a pretty big scar.

  7. #7
    lazyboy's Avatar
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    I pulled the trigger and ordered a Peapod. Thanks for your help!!

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