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  1. #1
    Senior Member keys?'s Avatar
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    basics, basics, basics

    So, the wind is only blowing at 5mph right now, which I find hard to believe I feel like I've been swinging in a tornado for the last few hours. I think I had my tarp staked out pretty good, but it still did a lot of flapping around. How do we prevent this? Is that what these little orange rubber things that ed speer sells is for? Should I be using shockcord with my tie outs, or are these the same idea?

    I'm sorry I'm kind of slow...it's an adjustment. All those years of sleeping on the ground must have given me a slow leak in my brain or something

  2. #2
    Senior Member keys?'s Avatar
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    I wonder if the lack of a real ridgline on the clark has anything to do with it? It just seems like everyone else has tighter pitches

  3. #3
    Senior Member gunn parker's Avatar
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    Hi
    Do you have any photos of your setup?
    cheers
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    How big/small are the trees you're attaching to?
    I've literally been 'bounced' in my hammock during a wind gust. The head-end was tied to a small, but leafy tree. The tree was prone to swaying in the wind which was nice in a light breeze, but frightening in a strong wind.

    As for the tarp flapping, is the XL cat cut? I don't think it is, but I could easily be wrong. Tarps with a straight edge are difficult to get, and keep, pitched tight along the edges. A little flap is pretty normal. If they are cat cut, then you might try using tensioners on your ground tie-outs to keep the tarp nice and tight overnight.
    Trust nobody!

  5. #5
    canoebie's Avatar
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    Tensioners do make a huge difference regardless of cut. At least the flys that I have are very vulnerable to even a change in humidity, let alone rain and wind. I use some shock cord loops as well as large O rings with success. Someday I will get a little more sophisticated (and more $) and get the Speer tensioners.

    I also hang a water bottle on the corners of my Claytor Diamond tarp and that helps keep it nice and tight. I am amazed at how much they drop just from a damp humid night.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member DougTheElder's Avatar
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    Using line tensioners makes good sense. Likewise, putting weight in the hammock can pull smaller trees closer together- even a teenie weenie little bit of slack in the tarp's ridgeline can create a pretty big flap factor.That same logic leads me to wonder why an elastic component is not a popular item on the ridge line. As Cannibal pointed out, trees can and do sway-so, if you start out with the ridgeline good and tight, and the trees sway apart, the tarp must get a little longer , right?
    Sometimes even a Blind Hog finds an Acorn

  7. #7
    tighter setup usually means less flapping as well

  8. #8
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    Trees of sufficient girth, tensioners, and pitching head into the wind have helped me. I've also pitched my large tarp to the ground (not using guylines) and closed down one end, and avoided a lot of wind that way. One trip that was the only way I could boil water, create a windless spot to light my stove.

  9. #9
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    Make sure the angle you are pulling on the tarp is good. The right angle, usually around 45 degrees to the ground (straight out from the corner of the tarp) will give a more taut pitch. If you see wrinkles in your tarp, this is a good sign you need to stake it at another angle.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
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  10. #10
    RootCause's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarahgirl View Post
    So, the wind is only blowing at 5mph right now, which I find hard to believe I feel like I've been swinging in a tornado for the last few hours. I think I had my tarp staked out pretty good, but it still did a lot of flapping around. How do we prevent this?
    It happens to me regularly- the first night I'm in the woods, the tarp flapping bugs me. After that first night, I never seem to hear it.

    But wait, now this thread has got me thinking that I can spend even MORE time and money fiddling with my setup! I've been so focused on getting my hammock and under-insulation perfect that I've forgotten all about the tarp! Hurray!


    (insert little icon of syringe with hammock logo, being injected into the arm of a gear junkie...)

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