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Thread: Tree Damage?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Curt's Avatar
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    Tree Damage?

    Curious about how tree damage plays out in the real world. I'm in the Pacific Northwest, so it will mostly be huge Douglas Firs and other big pines.

    I'm trying to decide between 1.5" single layer webbing, 1/2" tubular webbing, and just the cord I'll use from hammock to tree. I'm assuming the 1.5" won't do anything to the tree. Would the other two damage it? Cut into it?

    Thanks,

    -Curt

  2. #2
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    You really need to use a tree hugger or some other sort of webbing to attach you hammock to the tree. You can use some kind of cord from the webbing to the hammock if you want. That's the only way to definatly avoid tree damage, IMHO. I have never had webbing or tree hugger do any damage.

    You'll be doing less damage to the surrounding area by using a hammock instead of a tent anyway.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



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  3. #3
    Doctari's Avatar
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    If as I do, you use spectra cord to hang from, the damage to the trees from just one night would be substantal (spectra cord is very thin). But, you also, even with 2" webbing, need to be somewhat selecive. Example: In my back yard I have a Ginkgo tree, it's large enough to hang from, but even if I use 2" seatbelt webbing I leave a mark on the soft bark, a fairly deep mark. On my oaks: the 12" diameter tree, even using 1/4" climbers rope, over several nights, there is no noticable mark as to where I hung from. on the 6" tree, I really shouldn't hang for more than 2 nights in a row, then let it rest for about a week. The plum tree (mine even has THORNS) I can hang everynight for a week w no marks. It is (now, to me) fairly easy for me to determine which tree will "suffer".

    Even if you arn't worried about hurting the trees, setting up seems easier to me using some form of "tree hugger", & I set up nearly everynight, at home. Have been doing so since about Feb of this year.

    Note: when taking your hammock & stuff to your car AM of "garbage day" be sure you don't accidently drop your tree huggers by the trash cans @ the curb.

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    I agree with what's said. You do not want to risk any tree damage. If not because you want not to hurt the tree, but also since if people see hammocks doing tree damage then steps will be taken not to allow hammocks in that area. No sense in ruining it for everyone.

    I have used 1" webbing on the trees in my back yard. I probibly spent 15 nights and hung about 50+ other times out there. It is a hard bark tree. I can not see any damage on the dark with one wrap. On soft bark trees I have seen the dark compressed with one wrap over one night.

    This is why on the webbing I use I leave enough length to wrap around the tree 2 or 3 times. It adds a couple oz to my setup, but it is worth it to LNT.

    I am not saying you want to hurt the tree. I just want it said here for others to read too.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Curt's Avatar
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    Is wider automatically better? This makes sense since it would spread the pressure out, but I guess what my original question was really getting at was whether there's a big difference between something like the 1.5 flat and the .5 tubular. How thin does the line have to be to do damage?

    Thanks for the answers so far!

    -Curt

  6. #6
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    I don't think I would go any smaller than something 1" wide. You can also wrap the webbing around the tree a couple of times to help spread the pressure.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



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  7. #7
    Senior Member stoikurt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Is wider automatically better? This makes sense since it would spread the pressure out, but I guess what my original question was really getting at was whether there's a big difference between something like the 1.5 flat and the .5 tubular. How thin does the line have to be to do damage?

    Thanks for the answers so far!

    -Curt
    Wider is definately less stress on the tree. Half inch tubular would be no different than half inch flat as far as #psi on the tree.
    Stoikurt
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